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first super 8 camera


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#1 jfm341

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Posted 25 May 2006 - 05:33 AM

I am in film school where I plan to go into cinematography. I have an xl2 (mini-dv), but want to get as much experience on film as possible. We work in 16mm at nyu, but I want to own a camera that I can practice on. Super 8 is obviously the cheapest format. My friend loaned me a bell & howell 430 autoload from the '60s. It's too easy to use, automatic everything, (I'd expect that from a consumer camera for "home movies"). What cameras have manual settings and different lens options? What package would a "pro" have (if there is such a thing with super 8).
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#2 Ronney Ross

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Posted 25 May 2006 - 07:47 AM

First off let me say that I am fairly new to cinematography myself,

But what I can say is for the specific projects you do yes there are cameras that offer more "pro" type options. I would say look at a camera that allows 24 fps and a lens with a longer focal length( I will not name certain cameras b/c trying to keep up with the jones's doesn't make you any better.) The camera I got off ebay were real cheap but now that I am learning more about DOF and advancing at exposure making a good purchase for a better camera at the beginning would stop the desire for wanting one the top of the line models now.(really I am just going to start shooting a little 16mil stuff instead.) If you want other bell and whistles just search the particular camera description you are bidding on.

-Ronney Ross
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#3 Alex Wuijts

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Posted 25 May 2006 - 08:34 AM

if you want control, but don't want to pay too much, than maybe the Beaulieu 4008ZMII is a good option. It features a very nice 6-66mm Schneider-Kreuznach zoomlens with an aperture ring, manual asa setting, manual speed control from 2-70fps and a 1/87s shutter speed. This shutter speed is because it doesn't use a blade shutter like the 180 degree kind you find in most professional film cameras, but a guillotine shutter. The higher shutter speed and the sharp lens make for really crisp super8 images. The drawback of the 4008 is that it's design is cumbersome and not very practical.

Other super8 cameras that everybody seems to like are the Nikon R10 and the Canon 814XL-S and 1014 XL-S

Check out their features and other cameras at http://super8wiki.co...y:Manufacturers

Oh yeah, the Beaulieu cameras take c-mount lenses.

As far as pro's packages i'm not sure, but if you want expensive, you could go for the Beaulieu 6008 and 9008 pro series. But in that case maybe you're better off buying a 16mm camera.
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#4 Ian Marks

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Posted 25 May 2006 - 12:40 PM

My .02 -

First off, Super 8's not all that inexpensive anymore... more of a "niche" market for which you'll spend around two-thirds what you would working in 16mm. Things like a quality transfer to tape will cost the same regardless of whether you shot Super 8 or 16mm. However, good Super-8 cameras can be obtained at bargain prices.

Second of all, yes, make sure you get a camera that shoots at 24 fps, but forget about getting one with a long lens, as someone suggested. Wide is what you want and wide is hard to come by in Super 8. Finally, make sure you get one where you can set the exposure manually, and get yourself a good hand-held incident meter. You won't learn squat relying on your camera's auto exposure feature.

If you are interested in really learning cinematograhy (as opposed to videography), there are plenty of good all-manual 16mm cameras out there that will allow you to learn your craft (Bolex, Krasnogorsk, Filmo, K100) without the distraction of automatic exposure control. Your films will look much better too.
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#5 Olex Kalynychenko

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Posted 25 May 2006 - 02:38 PM

.... My friend loaned me a bell & howell 430 autoload from the '60s. It's too easy to use, automatic everything, (I'd expect that from a consumer camera for "home movies").


If you need low cost Super 8 camera, i recommend russian Quarz 1x8S-2.
This is reflex Super 8 cine camera with mechanical spring motor, have many fixed speed and zoom lens.
The camera have auto and manual aperture control have attachments for macro shooting and other accessories, have single frame shooting mode.
If you wish know about Quarz 1x8S-2 camera, please visit of my site
http://www.geocities.com/russiancamera

The Super 8 film possible rocess at home and show films on big screen by sine projector.
The many amateur filmmakers use a home film processing.
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#6 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 25 May 2006 - 11:59 PM

My .02 -

If you are interested in really learning cinematograhy (as opposed to videography), there are plenty of good all-manual 16mm cameras out there that will allow you to learn your craft (Bolex, Krasnogorsk, Filmo, K100) without the distraction of automatic exposure control. Your films will look much better too.


I don't find that 16mm lends itself to ultra small filming groups as well as super-8. I have moved as many as 5 super-8 cameras complete with tripods, all the film I need, filters and even wide angle attachments all by myself. I don't see that happening in 16mm.
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#7 Matt Pacini

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Posted 26 May 2006 - 02:40 PM

There are lots of excellent Super8 cameras, and unfortunately, even more bad ones.
Some cameras I've had personal experience with, and would recommend, are:

Nikon R-10 (or R-8)
Canon 1014XL-S (or 814 XL-S)
Bauer 750 XL-S
Nizo 6080


These are all great cameras. The Nizo is the only quite S8 camera though, so if you're shooting dialog, I would highly suggest getting one.
As far as image quality, all of these have very sharp lenses.

MP
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#8 Harmjan Heeling

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Posted 26 May 2006 - 03:03 PM

Beware of old super-8 camera's which cannot take f.e. the new filmstock Kodak 64T. The Canon 1014, 814 (XL-S), Nizo's (except 136, 148, 156), old Bauer 6,8,10 Royal (not the E!) can take different stock. Usually, most old can only take 25, 40 and 100 ASA.

For a list of color and black/white stock, take a look at my new website: www.super8camera.com

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Edited by www.super8camera.com, 26 May 2006 - 03:06 PM.

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#9 Alex Wuijts

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Posted 27 May 2006 - 10:38 AM

what's also important about the beaulieu 4008 is that you need to recell the batteries. The best thing you can do when you buy a super8 camera is to send it right off for service, because you never know what has happened to it. You want a camera you can trust so service is worth the money. With this service you can also ask for a replacement of the internal 85 filter (they get faded and dirty after so many years) and recell the batteries. You can also have the 85 filter removed, if you only want to use screw-on filters, but then the lens will need to be re-collimated.
As far as super8 goes, the beaulieu will probably cost you the most money, but in return you get a camera with a lot of great features and a real pro character.
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