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Green Day-boulevard of broken dreams


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#1 F Bulgarelli

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Posted 25 May 2006 - 11:34 AM

Hello,

Does anyone have any technical info on this music video.
especifically, the dirt/scratch effect. Was that done in post? It looks pretty organic to me.
I was thinking that a way to do it could be, to take 400ft of unexposed film and run in spools in a darks room, create all kinds of intentional scratches, dirt, flashes, etc, then develop the film and in post, layered it with the footage of the band.
Or I guess, I could strike a print of the bands footage and just mess it all up.

any ideas?

Thanks

Francisco
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#2 freddie bonfanti

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Posted 25 May 2006 - 11:47 AM

hi

there was a making of the video on mtv a year ago and it was so funny because the director (dont remember the name) achieved that effect tampering the exposed film with a black marker, cigarette ends and all sorts of things. it was amazing to watch
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#3 Francesco Bonomo

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Posted 25 May 2006 - 11:51 AM

the scratches were made by hand by the director, Sam Bayer, with a razor blade, on the processed film.
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#4 F Bulgarelli

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Posted 25 May 2006 - 12:55 PM

the scratches were made by hand by the director, Sam Bayer, with a razor blade, on the processed film.

Thanks guys.
I'm wondering if he used a print or the actual negative.
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#5 dudeguy37

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Posted 25 May 2006 - 04:46 PM

Thanks guys.
I'm wondering if he used a print or the actual negative.


I just popped on to YouTube and watched part of the video, trying to find an answer to your question. My guess is that he did it on a print because of certain shots where there was obvious chroma key work, though the scratches span each layer (i.e. the band in the foreground and the changing backgrounds) without break and are consistent even when the background changes. Either way, very cool video.
Peace,

-Harry
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#6 John Allardice

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Posted 25 May 2006 - 05:09 PM

My guess is that he did it on a print because of certain shots where there was obvious chroma key work, though the scratches span each layer (i.e. the band in the foreground and the changing backgrounds) without break and are consistent even when the background changes. Either way, very cool video.
Peace,

-Harry


Actually the was no greenscreen involved in that show, the backgrounds were all rear-projected.

J
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#7 Mike Panczenko

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Posted 25 May 2006 - 05:30 PM

I read an article in ICG magazine that said he did it to the original neg.
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#8 Igor Trajkovski

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Posted 25 May 2006 - 07:42 PM

Yes, i remember the making of it on MTV.

The director - Sam Bayer.

He started doing it, scratching, burning with cigarette,
i think he spilled coffe on it too, and said:
"I dear any director to do that!"

Hehe :)

Now was on the negative or was it on a print?....
Can't remember. I thing it may be on the print.
I think i saw a lightbox and magnifying glass there.

Anyway, a great article, interview with Sam Bayer on Kodak's site"
Sam Bayer Interview by Kodak

If the above does not look like a clickable link,
(i am experiencing problems with the "Insert Link" tool. Anybody else? i Started a topic on this in
Forum Support & Announcements) here is plain text link:

http://www.kodak.com...s/sbayer904.pdf


BTW, do you know what his first music video was?
Excerpt from the artivcle:

"BAYER: I didn't have any money when I came to Los Angeles in 1991. I knew one person at a record
company. I showed them this horrible, very pretentious, artsy reel that I had put together and I said, 'I really
wanted to direct a music video.' One person took pity on me and said, 'We've got this new band called
Nirvana. We are looking for a director and I like your attitude.' That was the first music video I directed. It is
called Smells Like a Teen Spirit. It won the MTV Award that year, and it became one of the top-rated music
videos of all time. (Editor's note: In 1998, is was chosen as the best MTV music video of all-time.)"

B)

Regards

Igor Trajkovski
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#9 dudeguy37

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Posted 25 May 2006 - 08:43 PM

Actually the was no greenscreen involved in that show, the backgrounds were all rear-projected.

J

Oh my gosh...that's even cooler. I love people who go back to old school methods and make it work so dang well. Kudos to everyone involved on this production. And thanks for telling me J, I appreciate it.
Peace,

-Harry
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Rig Wheels Passport

Metropolis Post

Visual Products

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

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