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#1 Christian Tanner

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Posted 28 May 2006 - 01:00 PM

hey guys!

i was wondering what is going to happen when an actor is taking pictures - using the stills cameras flash?

- what would i have to expose on? (under- or overexpose?)
- what colourtemp. it would be?
- and if i'd have to light in a certain way to get a good result...

thanx in advance guys!
cary
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#2 Stephen Williams

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Posted 28 May 2006 - 01:21 PM

hey guys!

i was wondering what is going to happen when an actor is taking pictures - using the stills cameras flash?

- what would i have to expose on? (under- or overexpose?)
- what colourtemp. it would be?
- and if i'd have to light in a certain way to get a good result...

thanx in advance guys!
cary


Hi,

Expose normally, the flash will probably bleach out 1 frame, but thats what you want. The old flash bulbs last longer but look odd after about 1975!
The colour temp is daylight, but that does not matter. There is a chance that the camera won't see the flash. I have done this a couple of times and it always worked, can't say why!

Stephen
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#3 Christian Tanner

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Posted 28 May 2006 - 01:34 PM

thanx stephen!

would it help to alter the shutter angle - to increase the chance ot see the flash at all?
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#4 Stephen Williams

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Posted 28 May 2006 - 01:51 PM

thanx stephen!

would it help to alter the shutter angle - to increase the chance ot see the flash at all?


Hi,

As wide as possible, with a 180 degreed shutter there is 50% chance of seeing the flash. Make the flash as bright as possible, that will increase the duration slightly.

Stephen
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#5 Hal Smith

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Posted 28 May 2006 - 02:14 PM

If I had to "fake" a flash and it was real important that it work everytime, I'd rig a magnet onto the camera inching knob and have it sweep past a hall-effect switch driving a solid-state relay. I'd figure out the proper position by having the circuit drive a bright LED in frame and phasing it so I didn't see it in my 2C's viewfinder. If I wanted to fuss some more in advance, I'd open the gate and rig a mirror so that I could watch light coming through the lens and shutter while the camera was running to get the phasing exactly correct. Once I got this far, triggering a strobe or bulb flash attachment would be easy. I'd have a momentary push button switch in series with the solid state switch that I'd push when I wanted the flash. The next time the inching knob came around to the sync position, the flash would fire.
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#6 Christian Tanner

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Posted 30 May 2006 - 05:00 AM

thanx hal!

very interesting thought. for this very next shoot i have to try it simple way though i think: shooting a couple of takes and hope for the best...

but seriously - will try that when i got the time.
cary
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Metropolis Post

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

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Wooden Camera

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Technodolly

Glidecam

Rig Wheels Passport

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Aerial Filmworks

The Slider

CineTape

Opal

Ritter Battery

rebotnix Technologies

Paralinx LLC

CineLab

Tai Audio