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Anyone shot any 16mm Fuji Stock?


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#1 Phil Thompson

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Posted 30 May 2006 - 08:25 AM

I called and they have this one stock which is dirt cheap.. ts 64T..

anyone shot it???? thoughts?
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#2 Stephen Williams

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Posted 30 May 2006 - 09:12 AM

I called and they have this one stock which is dirt cheap.. ts 64T..

anyone shot it???? thoughts?


Hi,

I think you mean 64D (daylight). I have used it many times.

Stephen
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#3 Phil Thompson

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Posted 30 May 2006 - 10:01 AM

Hi,

I think you mean 64D (daylight). I have used it many times.

Stephen



What are your opinions of it as a stock? Compared with the double or pro-x from Kodak?
Do you reckon it's good? And do you need loads of light?
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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 30 May 2006 - 10:08 AM

What are your opinions of it as a stock? Compared with the double or pro-x from Kodak?
Do you reckon it's good? And do you need loads of light?


It's 64 ASA, daylight-balanced -- of course you'd need a lot of daylight-balanced lighting if you're shooting interiors, just as you would if you used the Kodak equivalents, 7245 or 7201. The Kodak versions look a little sharper and finer-grained.

Outdoors in daylight, it's fast enough for most situations except extreme overcast, or shaded woods maybe. In direct sunlight on a crisp clear day, you'd be at an f/22 nearly (at 24 fps), between an f/16-f/22 split, unless you used ND filters.

But for daylight-balanced interiors, you may find a 250D stock to be more practical, like Fuji Eterna 250D or Kodak 7205.
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#5 Phil Thompson

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Posted 30 May 2006 - 10:21 AM

Sorry i made a mistake in this thread.. I ment the one and only B&W fuji stock..

any thoughts?
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#6 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 30 May 2006 - 10:33 AM

I didn't think Fuji sold their b&w neg emulsion for motion picture work anymore, but if it's 64 ASA, then it would need quite a bit of light, just like Plus-X. Luckily in b&w you can get away with harder, smaller light sources rather than use soft lighting techniques, which require more powerful units in order to achieve a decent f-stop.

So certainly it's possible to light interiors in b&w with 64 ASA film if you've only got a collection of 650w and 1K's, if you're working with hard lighting techniques and the rooms are not too huge.
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#7 oscar jimenez

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Posted 30 May 2006 - 12:14 PM

i have used Fuji, but not 64 stock, I do love 125T the color rendition is incredible, I was doing a shoot with 500t asa Fuji and run out of 500, loaded a mag with 125T and couldnt believe how good they did cut, no perceptible difference. I just tried 250D and 500D few days ago, just waiting to see footage how this stocks behave, but Fuji is great.
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#8 hoyte

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Posted 30 May 2006 - 01:00 PM

I shot a small test on it last weekend: it is rated at 80asa for daylight I think, but someone from fuji claimed that you should expose it as it was a 120 asa film...which I did. i applied a very soft grade, which looked in all very "glamourous".
I think it's called fuji RP 72161
i also shot on the kodak 64 asa B/W, which I liked even better, in spite of the "older" technology... little grain as expected, but still enough to see and feel the "film".

Go for it, if you can get it cheap... harder light is a bit more forgiving in B/W, which comes in handy if you want to create a bit more contrast on this not so hard stock.
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#9 Max Lundberg

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Posted 30 May 2006 - 02:51 PM

I think FG 71112 / RP 72161 80D is a special order product. Although you can get it easily anytime in Europe at least.

like Fuji Eterna 250D or Kodak 7205.

I have to ask this. Why you use types only with kodak? I mean why Kodak is 7205 but Fuji isn't 8663? Or why Fuji is Eterna 250D but Kodak isn't vision2 250D? Specially now, when kodak doesn't offer old 7246 anymore but Fuji still offers 8662.
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#10 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 31 May 2006 - 01:01 AM

I mean why Kodak is 7205 but Fuji isn't 8663?


Because I don't always remember the Fuji stock numbers off the top of my head, especially when I'm not typing this at home where I can look it up quickly. I try and remember that the daylight-balanced Fuji stocks are even-numbered for the third digit (64D is '22, 250D is '63 -- but 125T is '32 and 250T is '53. But I can't remember what 500D is.)
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#11 Phil Thompson

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Posted 01 June 2006 - 05:46 AM

I shot a small test on it last weekend: it is rated at 80asa for daylight I think, but someone from fuji claimed that you should expose it as it was a 120 asa film...which I did. i applied a very soft grade, which looked in all very "glamourous".
I think it's called fuji RP 72161
i also shot on the kodak 64 asa B/W, which I liked even better, in spite of the "older" technology... little grain as expected, but still enough to see and feel the "film".

Go for it, if you can get it cheap... harder light is a bit more forgiving in B/W, which comes in handy if you want to create a bit more contrast on this not so hard stock.



can i get away with minimal lighting using 80 asa?
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#12 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 01 June 2006 - 11:43 AM

Depends on what you mean, but I would guess "no", not if you don't have access to a small tungsten lighting kit. 80 ASA is too slow for much interior available lighting. If you have a light meter, it would be easy for you to check without shooting any film -- just set-up what you would consider a normal lighting situation for your project and take out your meter.
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