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16mm camera to begin with


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#1 Drew Ott

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Posted 03 June 2006 - 10:22 PM

I've recently been turned away from purchasing a DV camera, and now I'm looking into 16mm.

I'm 15, and a lot of people say that film is too "complicated" for somebody my age to learn, but I would spend tons of time learning it and I could figure it out eventually.

My budget is about $3,000: includes camera, DIY lighting (probably work lights), shotgun mic, film reels, film-to-video transfer for editing, etc.

Do you have any advice for which camera to get, or if I need to increase my budget to maybe $4,000 to get a much better camera?

Thanks.

By the way, I don't really know anything about how to transfer film to video.
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#2 Drew Ott

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Posted 03 June 2006 - 10:36 PM

http://cgi.ebay.com/...1QQcmdZViewItem

How does this camera look?
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#3 Eric Dinger

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Posted 04 June 2006 - 12:21 AM

It looks like a lens. There is no camera in that auction. It sounds like you have no experience with film at all, even in a still camera. Is this true?

Film isn't too complicated for someone your age to learn, but I would recomend starting off with a still camera to get an idea of what it can do. Shooting reversals (slides) will give you better feedback as labs can do a lot of correction when printing negitives.
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#4 Drew Ott

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Posted 04 June 2006 - 02:15 PM

It looks like a lens. There is no camera in that auction. It sounds like you have no experience with film at all, even in a still camera. Is this true?

Film isn't too complicated for someone your age to learn, but I would recomend starting off with a still camera to get an idea of what it can do. Shooting reversals (slides) will give you better feedback as labs can do a lot of correction when printing negitives.


I was actually looking into that a while ago. The full-manual film SLR still camera. The thing is, I plan to enter the short I want to make in some contests coming up, and, I can't quite do that with a still camera.

Thanks though.

I may just skip the contests and get the still camera before I go into "motion-film."
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#5 Joe Gioielli

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Posted 04 June 2006 - 03:32 PM

I think you are on the right track. Right now, don't worry about contests, or even spending a lot of money on equipment. Plenty of time for that later. Right now the important thing is to learn the basics.

Hit your local camera store, or ask around your friends and family. Get a manual slr, a lightmeter, some film and some books. Then go out and have fun with it. Do things wrong to see what kind of effects your "mistakes" cause to the film.

Once you get good at still photography, go get a REGULAR 8mm camera. They are very cheap and you will learn how to thread film into a camera and will get a real feel for how film moves through a camera. (I feel Super 8 is too easy to learn with. Use it later after you get your feet wet.)

Once you get that down, buy a cheap 16mm camera and do it again.

The idea is that mistakes are expensive, and you will make them. Relax, we all do. You just want to make them on the least expensive format. Believe me. you will feel alot better wasting 25ft of regular 8mm film because you loaded it wrong than you will ruining 400ft of 16mm.

Welcome to the forum and best wishes
Joe
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#6 Olex Kalynychenko

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Posted 05 June 2006 - 03:19 AM

I've recently been turned away from purchasing a DV camera, and now I'm looking into 16mm.

I'm 15, and a lot of people say that film is too "complicated" for somebody my age to learn, but I would spend tons of time learning it and I could figure it out eventually.

My budget is about $3,000: includes camera, DIY lighting (probably work lights), shotgun mic, film reels, film-to-video transfer for editing, etc.

Do you have any advice for which camera to get, or if I need to increase my budget to maybe $4,000 to get a much better camera?

Thanks.

By the way, I don't really know anything about how to transfer film to video.


I think, you need begin from russian 16 mm cameras, this can be Kransogorsk-3 ( $150..250) or professional qulity Kinor-16 SX-2M ) ($750..1250).
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#7 Michael Carter

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Posted 05 June 2006 - 08:25 AM

I started 3 years earlier than what your age now is using regular 8mm. Now, I wish those films were 16mm. I have some great shots of my family that is long gone. Not too many mistakes were made even with a sundial guessing light exposure guide. If I were to start again I'd use a 16mm camera and a light meter.
Filmmakers do not transfer film to video. That is done by labs.
Start with pictures only and no sound. After you get good pictures then work on adding sound.
Reversal film forces you to learn how to expose properly.
Look into art centers and film schools. Our local has high school programs.
I like the Keystone A-7 or 9 cameras because they are possible to take apart, oil, and adjust yourself. Well, it took me a long time to try it, but there was nothing to loose since the one camera I had at the time died. Now I have 3 too many waiting to be done. One more works well enough for more film again. They are about the lowest cost 100 foot load 16mm camera on ebay.
Cameras DO need to be serviced. Find service for the one you choose before you buy any or you will need to learn how to do it yourself.
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#8 Landis Tanaka

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Posted 06 June 2006 - 02:48 AM

wow im 15 also and I thought I was the only person my age into 16mm! I have a K-3 and I love it. Its a good, cheap, solid 16mm cam thats perfect for beginning.
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#9 Richardson Leao

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Posted 06 June 2006 - 05:28 AM

I have a k3 and a kinor 16 and I agree with Olexandr, go russian. The kinor is very easy to load and to do sound stuff it's great, i felt in love with that camera, but to start with I also would go for the K3. Also, if you want to save money, buy a processing tank and develop your own film, it's easy and fun.
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#10 Robert Hughes

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Posted 06 June 2006 - 04:58 PM

I'd recommend shooting Black & White 16mm on a Bolex, Filmo or K3, processing the film at home as negative (using the very simple D-76 developer / vinegar stop / rapid fixer process flow) and becoming a film auteur. You're never too young to be a genius. Even if not a genius, you'll still have fun, learn filmmaking, and you'll gain the respect and envy of every tech geek in your class.
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#11 Matthew Buick

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Posted 29 June 2006 - 07:11 AM

I'm 15 too, and am thinking about 16mm over Super 8, no idea what camera to buy though.
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#12 Olex Kalynychenko

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Posted 29 June 2006 - 12:40 PM

I'd recommend shooting Black & White 16mm on a Bolex, Filmo or K3, processing the film at home as negative (using the very simple D-76 developer / vinegar stop / rapid fixer process flow)


I recommend 16 mm cine camera and B&W reversal film with home processing on spiral tank,
traditional edit and show with cine projector.
The next step, use 16 mm color reversal film with home processing on spiral tank.
This is low cost technology of home film making.
You not need telecine, computer edit, but, you will have result and can show personal film on big screen.
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