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Transfering Flat/low contrast or transfering to a look


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#1 Andy_Alderslade

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Posted 04 June 2006 - 09:58 AM

Sorry to ask a silly question, but i'm having difficulty making my mind up on this, and without supervision.

I'm about to deliver a project to a lab for process and telecine. The project containing a mixture of super 16 and super 8 neg, is on the low-end of the budget scale, so it will be edited on DV for finishing on DV and DVD.

The question I need to know is, would it be better to have it transfered low contrast and neutral and then perform alterations after editing using Final Cut Pro colour correction and grading tools OR send in some instructions with pictures and have the final look achieved in transfer?

Of course I can't afford a supervised transfer and labs seem to have stopped the five minute sit-ins.
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#2 David Cox

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Posted 04 June 2006 - 12:12 PM

It depends on what you want to achieve. If you know exactly what you want without having to see alternatives, then you could give instructions to the lab. This doesn?t then stop you making further alterations in your FCP, but does limit some options if you are trying to reverse what the lab has done.

Also bare in mind that if you transfer a very low contrast image to DV, then boosting the contrast from the data on the DV image can lead to some artefacts as you end up pushing the DV compression beyond its limits.

What is the plan with the 16 and 8mm stuff? Do you want them to end up looking similar or are they intended to look very different? I?m just wondering that if you wanted them to look as close as possible, that you might be better off getting neutral transfers so that you can match them in your cut, when you can see them cut together.

The safest bet would be to get the lab to make a transfer that has the contrast range you like, but doesn?t do anything too weird to the colours. This would give you a good basis to make final decisions with the grading tools you have available without feeling too much the limitations of DV.

David Cox
Baraka Post Production Ltd
www.baraka.co.uk
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#3 Andy_Alderslade

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Posted 04 June 2006 - 12:39 PM

What is the plan with the 16 and 8mm stuff? Do you want them to end up looking similar or are they intended to look very different? I’m just wondering that if you wanted them to look as close as possible, that you might be better off getting neutral transfers so that you can match them in your cut, when you can see them cut together.
www.baraka.co.uk


The 8 and 16 will be cut together, but hopefully each of the formats will have its own look to stand against the other, but certainly not with regards to colour pallette or tones.

So perhaps the best strategy following your advise, would be to have it transfered neutral, with a request that the contrast be kept 'natural' in consideration of the conditions - a sunny, cloudless day.

Thanks for your help David,

Andy

Edited by Andy_Alderslade, 04 June 2006 - 12:42 PM.

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#4 Michael Nash

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Posted 04 June 2006 - 05:05 PM

How much footage are you talking about? Can you afford to do two transfers; one flat, one "best light?"
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#5 Chris Burke

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Posted 07 June 2006 - 05:53 AM

Sorry to ask a silly question, but i'm having difficulty making my mind up on this, and without supervision.

I'm about to deliver a project to a lab for process and telecine. The project containing a mixture of super 16 and super 8 neg, is on the low-end of the budget scale, so it will be edited on DV for finishing on DV and DVD.

The question I need to know is, would it be better to have it transfered low contrast and neutral and then perform alterations after editing using Final Cut Pro colour correction and grading tools OR send in some instructions with pictures and have the final look achieved in transfer?

Of course I can't afford a supervised transfer and labs seem to have stopped the five minute sit-ins.



If you really are strapped for cash and are really savvy at how do obtain the look you want at your home on your own workstation, then do the flat transfer to hard drive as uncompressed media. Best cost conscious choice.

chris
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Paralinx LLC

FJS International, LLC

rebotnix Technologies

Willys Widgets

Abel Cine

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Metropolis Post

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Ritter Battery

Tai Audio

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Visual Products

CineTape

Technodolly

Rig Wheels Passport

CineLab

Wooden Camera

Aerial Filmworks

The Slider