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Anamorphic for K-100?


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#1 Leigh Hanlon

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Posted 05 June 2006 - 03:06 PM

Has anybody fitted an anamorphic lens to the Kodak K-100? The model I'm using has a three-lens turret.

I'd probably be more interested in a lens with 1.5X compression. Didn't Vistascope and Iscorama once make anamorphics designed specifically for 16mm?

Leigh Hanlon
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 05 June 2006 - 03:44 PM

The old C-mount anamorphic lenses made for 16mm amateur shooters was the 2X CinemaScope variety. There were a number of CinemaScope amateur filmmaking clubs that sprang up in the late 1950's. But the lenses are pretty rare these days and the quality was pretty low from what I hear. They might have been attachments, not whole combined single-unit lenses.

The only mention I've heard of a 1.5X anamorphic lens was in this old thread by Mitch Gross:

QUOTE
JP at Aaton experimented with this a bit a couple of years ago but then abandoned it. There are some definite negatives to this, the biggest of which is that you must go through a DI in order to extract the image as there are no optical printers set up with the proper magnification ratio glass. That and you're going to be wasting a bit of the image area on the sides in order to get a properly framed blow-up (not too bad, I think it was around 10%). 1.33 is actually the ideal blow-up proportion but the only glass made in this ratio is either very expensive and large projection lenses or relatively low-quality video adapters. There are some newer 1.33 anamorphics out there for a little less, but the smallest unit one could work with and get decent results from is the Panasonic adater for the DVX100 at $800, and it will still look pretty fuzzy when blown up to 35mm.

The ISCO 1.5x glass of which you refer is projection lenses adapted for shooting. They simply mount in front of the regular lens and both lenses need to be focused constantly--a real pain. The only lens that JP found practical would vignette anything wider than a 25mm. After recropping to 1.85 that lens would yield the equivalent of about a 16mm, which is not particularly wide. In the end it was deemed to really not be worth it because the imaging was greatly inferior and it was a major pain and not a small expense to work with the system.

JP was chiefly experimenting with putting a 1.5x adapter on a Super-16 lens to get 2.40 widescreen images. Without bringing back this discussion (those interested can look back in the 2003 and 2002 archives) I can tell you that JP decided that this wasn't really worth it either, and that it was easier and better to simply crop the S-16 frame to get the wider frame. Others have successfully shot regular 16mm with 2x anamorphic lenses and then cropped the excess frame area to get a 2.40 35mm print. Note that the cropping in either of these systems is almost identical in negative area used. The theoretical advantage of the 1.5x adapter system is that it would use the most negative area for the finished blowup, but the restrictions of the system were considered too great to be worthwhile.
END QUOTE
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