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I wanted to share these sites for home processing info


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#1 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 06 June 2006 - 08:16 PM

For those of you who want to try your hand at this, especially the 8mm guys, here ya go:

lavender.fortunecity.com/lavender/569/homeprocessing.html#

www.geocities.com/gselinsky/

www.geocities.com/russiancamera/processing/processing.htm

www.filmforever.org/chap11.html

www.squidoo.com/super8/

www.film-to-video.com/info.htm

www.city-net.com/~fodder/hand/colorrev.html

homepage.mac.com/onsuper8/process.html

www.filmshooting.com/thelab/bwreversal.php

www.handmadefilm.org




And this:

www.film-to-video.com/info.htm

/truetex.com/telecine.htm

And of course our own:

www.cinematography.com/forum2004/lofiversion/index.php?f9.html

Enjoy! B)
PS if anyone has any to add, they would be greatly appreciated I'm sure!

Edited by Capt.Video, 06 June 2006 - 08:17 PM.

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#2 James Erd

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Posted 06 June 2006 - 08:50 PM

For those of you who want to try your hand at this, especially the 8mm guys, here ya go:

lavender.fortunecity.com/lavender/569/homeprocessing.html#

www.geocities.com/gselinsky/

www.geocities.com/russiancamera/processing/processing.htm

www.filmforever.org/chap11.html

www.squidoo.com/super8/

www.film-to-video.com/info.htm

www.city-net.com/~fodder/hand/colorrev.html

homepage.mac.com/onsuper8/process.html

www.filmshooting.com/thelab/bwreversal.php

www.handmadefilm.org
And this:

www.film-to-video.com/info.htm

/truetex.com/telecine.htm

And of course our own:

www.cinematography.com/forum2004/lofiversion/index.php?f9.html

Enjoy! B)
PS if anyone has any to add, they would be greatly appreciated I'm sure!


Hey that's great. I'm book marking all of those sites. :)

I just dug up an old set of operating instructions for a Morse G3 tank. It gives all the measurements in Drams, grains, and OZ. I'll be happy to translate it if any one is interested trying it out. I should probably dissuade any one from buy the Morse G3 if they are looking for the highest quality of home processing. Still it's a cheap way to go as far as the cost of chemicals.
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#3 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 07 June 2006 - 07:56 PM

A lotta guys use those. you'll probably have to build a drying rack but that's not too hard. There was a recent thread where there was a fairly long discussion on these hand operated tanks. there were a lot of good sites about them on there as well. www.cinematography.com/forum2004/index.php?showtopic=9878. Some real good advice as well. B)
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#4 James Erd

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Posted 07 June 2006 - 08:30 PM

A lotta guys use those. you'll probably have to build a drying rack but that's not too hard. There was a recent thread where there was a fairly long discussion on these hand operated tanks. there were a lot of good sites about them on there as well. www.cinematography.com/forum2004/index.php?showtopic=9878. Some real good advice as well. B)


I once made a processing machine for 16mm, and a drying rack but I had to dismantle them when I moved. The machine was basically a tray made to fit very closely around fiberglass drum on which the film was wound emulsion side out. The drum was rotated by an electric motor I salvaged from a BBQ. It was all very elaborate but the results were awful. As the film absorbed the chemicals it grew in length and didn't want to stay on the drum. The other problem was oxidation.
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#5 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 07 June 2006 - 09:34 PM

Howed you get rid of the Rem-jet or was this strictly for B&W film?

Edited by Capt.Video, 07 June 2006 - 09:35 PM.

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#6 James Erd

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Posted 07 June 2006 - 09:47 PM

Howed you get rid of the Rem-jet or was this strictly for B&W film?



Oh yes, just B&W, and that was bad enough. I can't imagine trying to do color processing in it. It really was a neat machine, and very elaborate, but it just didn't work. Too bad I never took any pictures of it.

I actually got better results using the bucket method [except for the scratching of course]

I'd like to try the acetate separator if I could find or make a dimpler, but where can one get 100' of unperfed 16mm acetate these days?

I think I have a formula some where for Rem-jet. If you like, I'll see if I can't find it.
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#7 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 07 June 2006 - 09:54 PM

You already have a G-3 but if you go to that first site, there's intructions on building a processing machine (well, maybe "Machine" isn't the right term) as well as a drying rack. Maybe you could get some ideas.

Edited by Capt.Video, 07 June 2006 - 09:55 PM.

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#8 Clive Tobin

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Posted 07 June 2006 - 11:15 PM

... As the film absorbed the chemicals it grew in length and didn't want to stay on the drum. ...


Put stainless nails in a spiral around the drum at intevals to prevent the film from shifting sideways and overlapping as it stretches.

Attach the ends to rubber bands or springs to take up slack. For this to work the surface has to be pretty slippery.
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#9 James Erd

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Posted 07 June 2006 - 11:43 PM

Put stainless nails in a spiral around the drum at intevals to prevent the film from shifting sideways and overlapping as it stretches.

Attach the ends to rubber bands or springs to take up slack. For this to work the surface has to be pretty slippery.


The drum was constructed of fiberglass with Polyester reason. A 1/4" polyester cord was wrapped around it in a spiral. Then more fiberglass was added to encase the cord and the whole thing was given a very slippery gel coat. The spiral cord was intended to keep the film separated in the same way as the stainless steel nails would have.

At the ends the film strip I used stretchy rubber fasteners with stainless steel clips. The problem of the film growing was always worse in the middle where it would slip over the cord separator in-spite of the rubber bands attached at each end of the film. I would have made the cord separator higher to account for this but I had constructed the sink to fit the drum as closely as possible to minimize the amount of chems needed for each batch of film.

I would have made a bigger sink to fit the increased size of the drum except that the results were pretty horrid due to the oxidation of the chems. I considered adding an inert gas such as nitrogen to prevent oxidation but that was going to raise the cost quite a bit.

More importantly I had this machine at my Mom's house... and she wasn't too happy about that. In the end I decided that I might go back to the G3 or try to find a reasonably priced Russian Spiral tank. I found the G3 first for $20. There is a Russian Spiral up at Action Camera, but they are asking $249 which I feel is a bit pricey for any spiral tank.
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#10 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 08 June 2006 - 04:08 PM

You know, I had an idea about motorizing a G-3 so as to standardize the rate at which the film passed through the solution. I figured a reversible motor set on a reostat w/ a set of gears and a bicycle chain would work. With a little practice you should be able to get very consistant results, particularly if you could set the motor to reverse automatically when it get to the ends on the film being processed (maybe with a timer/ polarity switch combo). Also if you could find a way to keep the temp of the solution constant (maybe a modified water heater from a bottled water dispenser would work) All this shouldn't be that expensive and for someone like you w/ an aptitute for fabrication would be that dificult to do. Just a thought. B)
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Metropolis Post

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The Slider

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Technodolly

Abel Cine

Visual Products

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Ritter Battery

Willys Widgets