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The Omen


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#1 Vincent T Sharma

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Posted 08 June 2006 - 12:50 PM

Just saw the movie.........some great jump scare scenes.......apart from that nothing new in this version.....liked the editing though, of course, important for any horror movie..


One thing I noticed was the usage of the color red in almost everyscene, the slow tracking camera.

I guess the best scene in the movie is when the priest gets killed.


Looking forward to your posts on this movie
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#2 Jo Laurits Aksdal

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Posted 09 June 2006 - 03:18 AM

Just saw the movie.........some great jump scare scenes.......apart from that nothing new in this version.....liked the editing though, of course, important for any horror movie..
One thing I noticed was the usage of the color red in almost everyscene, the slow tracking camera.

I guess the best scene in the movie is when the priest gets killed.
Looking forward to your posts on this movie


I didn't like it at all. There was too much tell and too little show. I guess the best scene was when the boy on the triwheeler knocked his mother over the hallway railing. Great suspense there.

The lighting was neat, but I thougt the compositions was , well, like the whole film, unmotivated. The combination of high value master shots cut to dull, overused close-ups just didn't do it for me. Again those talking head close-ups / OS shots. Is Satan at play here?
And the dialogue, oh my god. No Satan at play there. Just boring, unmotivated actors at work.
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#3 Morgan Peline

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Posted 11 June 2006 - 12:20 PM

Hi,

I though the original was so much much scarier and moodier. This one was all exposition and no suspense...Just shows how a good director and a bad director can make all the difference to the same material. Modern directors these days just don't seem to have a clue how to create true old-fashioned hairs standing on the back of your neck, spine-tingling suspense and foreboding.
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#4 Dan Goulder

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Posted 11 June 2006 - 12:26 PM

I though the original was so much much scarier and moodier. This one was all exposition and no suspense...Just shows how a good director and a bad director can make all the difference to the same material. People nowadays haven't got a clue how to create true old-fashioned suspense.

I was surprised to read that Ebert and Roeper gave it two thumbs up, as I would have expected them to concur with your observation. What an utter lack of inspiration.
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#5 Morgan Peline

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Posted 11 June 2006 - 06:11 PM

Yep, it's a pity, it could have been a great re-working....Never mind! Another sell-out!
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#6 K Borowski

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Posted 14 June 2006 - 02:13 PM

The original was better. I read somewhere either director or DOP of this film talking about them doing all this stuff that they couldn't do in the original. OK, so why is the original still better? They had better actors, better cinematography, and a deeper story. Haha, maybe Ebert and Roper missed the original ;-)

Regards.

~Karl
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#7 Dan Goulder

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Posted 15 June 2006 - 09:55 PM

It's amazing to think that the O-men came out within a week of the X-men...(A-men?)
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#8 Richard Boddington

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Posted 15 June 2006 - 10:04 PM

To your original point about the colour red, yes I think we all noticed it.

The problem is what did it signify because it was used every where??????????

Maybe I missed some thing, which is quite likely.

The best time it was used was when the woman in the red raincoat ran across the background during the rain storm when the priest was left alone. Subtle yet effective.

But what did it all mean? It wasn't used just before some one died that I could tell, it just popped up every where.

In the making of Jaws DVD Spielberg talks about telling the production designer to only have red appear on screen in the form of blood.

R,
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#9 Vincent T Sharma

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Posted 15 June 2006 - 11:30 PM

Agree with you...... You gotta see the Sixth Sense for the effective use of color red
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#10 Bob Hayes

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Posted 16 June 2006 - 04:09 PM

My favorite use of the bloody primary color is ?Don?t Look Now?. It is one of the creepiest horror film ever made. The film is devoid of red until something evil is about to happen. Man does it work. And the final payoff is huge.
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