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Looking for 16mm spirit transfer in the midwest


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#1 Robert Skates

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Posted 08 June 2006 - 06:56 PM

GTN in Oakpark, MI no longer offers 16mm transfers via the Spirit. They upgraded their Spirit and decided the cost of the 16mm gate was not in line with their volume of 16mm tranfers. The Spirit and the Kodak vision 2 stocks have done wonders for 16mm.

I was planning a project around 7229 and 7218, using the 29 for a low con faded look at a segment of society that exists in sort of timeless world. The 18 would have been for the rest of the world portion of the film. Lighting, framing, color and art direction are all being designed to delineate the two worlds. Using the two different 500 asa stocks was another tool to help seperate the looks. The film speed was also going to help us move a little faster with our limited grip package. We are shooting regular 16 composing for 1.85:1 I know S16 would be a better choice but it would mean a camera rental/insurance and that just is not in the budgt for this short. There are plenty of great deals on older Ranks, Quandras, or Ursa. Some better than others. Having to transfer on an older system may cause me to shoot on 7217. I trust the Spirit / V2 500asa combination. I just a little concerned about the older Ranks with the 7229 & 7218 etc. The ideal would be a Spirit or a really well maintained and calibrated Rank.

So I am looking for recommendations for transfer facilities in the midwest. Chicago and Toronto would be first on the list as they are close to S.E. Michigan. As a D.P. that has made a career of less than stellar one light / best light unsupervised tranfers, I feel I must supervise the transfer. This will most likely come out of my pocket. So If anyone has had a good experience with a transfer house in MI, IL, OH, PA, or Toronto, I would gladly love to hear your story. Thanks one and all.

Robert Skates
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#2 Robert Skates

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Posted 17 June 2006 - 08:00 AM

GTN in Oakpark, MI no longer offers 16mm transfers via the Spirit. They upgraded their Spirit and decided the cost of the 16mm gate was not in line with their volume of 16mm tranfers. The Spirit and the Kodak vision 2 stocks have done wonders for 16mm.

I was planning a project around 7229 and 7218, using the 29 for a low con faded look at a segment of society that exists in sort of timeless world. The 18 would have been for the rest of the world portion of the film. Lighting, framing, color and art direction are all being designed to delineate the two worlds. Using the two different 500 asa stocks was another tool to help seperate the looks. The film speed was also going to help us move a little faster with our limited grip package. We are shooting regular 16 composing for 1.85:1 I know S16 would be a better choice but it would mean a camera rental/insurance and that just is not in the budgt for this short. There are plenty of great deals on older Ranks, Quandras, or Ursa. Some better than others. Having to transfer on an older system may cause me to shoot on 7217. I trust the Spirit / V2 500asa combination. I just a little concerned about the older Ranks with the 7229 & 7218 etc. The ideal would be a Spirit or a really well maintained and calibrated Rank.

So I am looking for recommendations for transfer facilities in the midwest. Chicago and Toronto would be first on the list as they are close to S.E. Michigan. As a D.P. that has made a career of less than stellar one light / best light unsupervised tranfers, I feel I must supervise the transfer. This will most likely come out of my pocket. So If anyone has had a good experience with a transfer house in MI, IL, OH, PA, or Toronto, I would gladly love to hear your story. Thanks one and all.

Robert Skates


Thought I would bump this post.

There must be some transfer houses in the midwest with a Spirit set up with 16mm gate. I did a google search that really did not turn up anything, so perhaps I'll have to consider a different system or suffer through another unsupervised transfer from the coast. It is heart breaking to put so much thought and effort into designing the look of a film only to cross your fingers and hope that the colorists reads your notes and does not attempt to fix a dream sequence that was shot 4 stops over by design. (happened to me once, ever with notes and a leader card saying "over exposure is GOOD")

If anyone has had a good experience with a transfer house/colorist in the midwest I would like to hear about it. Anyone from Chicago to Toronto and all points in between. Thanks.

Robert Skates
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#3 Sam Wells

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Posted 18 June 2006 - 08:37 AM

There have got to be quite a few Spirits in that area.

Technicolor Toronto ? (I know they have a Millennium, they must have a Spirit or two.)

I'm not familiar with Chicago post houses. Optimus I bet. Make some calls.

http://www.filmworke...o.com/home.html

http://www.filmworke...m/telecine.html

Or you could contact Thomson Grass Valley

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#4 Sam Wells

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Posted 18 June 2006 - 09:01 AM

hope that the colorists reads your notes and does not attempt to fix a dream sequence that was shot 4 stops over by design. (happened to me once, ever with notes and a leader card saying "over exposure is GOOD")


Yes but this is still too vague for a colorist to deal with.

Do you want very hot, do you want what looks like clear leader with the vestiges of image ?

The very power and flexibility of the telecine and color grading system allow for x number of possibilities at the same time... so "overexposure is good" means way too many things...

Do you want to go into secondary corrections, Power Windows; the things you can do with Davinci Creative Suite, etc etc ?

That said, If the intention is the "look" of 4 stops overexposed, I'm not at all sure overexposing 4 stops for material intended to be transferred via telecine is the best way to do it.... it's not so hard to blow stuff out in the transfer...

-Sam
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#5 Dan Goulder

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Posted 18 June 2006 - 11:20 AM

Depending on your level of experience, you shouldn't assume that your 'supervising' presence is automatically going to lead to superior results. Since you're particular about your results, and have every right to be, you should choose a first-rate transfer facility, regardless of proximity. A first-rate colorist located thousands of miles away will most likely give you better results than you'll get from a second-rate colorist, EVEN if you're looking over his shoulder.
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#6 Stephen Williams

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Posted 18 June 2006 - 12:54 PM

A first-rate colorist located thousands of miles away will most likely give you better results than you'll get from a second-rate colorist, EVEN if you're looking over his shoulder.



Hi,

Very true, I did a best light pass at a lab in New York for safety. That transfer on a Spirit to PAL digibeta was better than I could get with the local star colorist in Zurich!

Stephen
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#7 Sam Wells

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Posted 18 June 2006 - 01:21 PM

What's best is to work with someone you can get on the same page with & is sympathetic to the work.

Of course you discover this by doing it although recommendations can help; sorry that I can't recommend anyone in Chicago or Toronto, never done it there..

-Sam
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#8 Scott Fritzshall

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Posted 18 June 2006 - 01:53 PM

There are a bunch of post houses in Chicago. I don't know offhand what machines they all have, but I'm sure that several have Spirits. Check out this link:
http://www.creatived...om/html/71.html

The Filmworker's Club is the only place that lists a Spirit on there, but I'm sure several other places have one as well. Check out the larger places like Optimus, I^3, S2, etc. Avenue may be getting something nice in the near future.
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#9 Jeremy Rumas

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Posted 19 June 2006 - 10:19 AM

I'm definitely no expert on this, but from what I have heard, Filmworkers Astro is a good lab. It was recommended to me by a friend that works at another film lab in the Chicago area. I've stopped in there to talk with them about my own project and they were helpful and good to deal with. I plan on getting my 16mm film telecined there. I am also pretty sure that when big budget film projects come through Chicago, they often use Astro. I'm based in Chicago, and when I asked around, Astro was the recommendation.

Jeremy
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#10 Robert Hughes

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Posted 03 July 2006 - 07:36 AM

Hi-Wire in Minneapolis is a pro shop with a well respected colorist:

http://www.hi-wire.com/
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