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Triumph of the Will


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#1 Matt Butler

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Posted 11 June 2006 - 01:15 AM

Here is a real left field question - (or should that be right field?)

Recently viewed a re-mastered DVD copy of this film from our local video shop and wondered what type of 35mm cine cameras they employed in those days in Germany?

googling wasn't much help, but came across this site with some production stills.

http://rubens.anu.ed...enstahl/triumph

Any idea of make of cameras featured in the first thee photo's?

cheers

matt butler
Sydney, Australia
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#2 Nathan Milford

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Posted 11 June 2006 - 02:01 AM

The first two look like they might be a Debrie Parvo or Interview:

http://www.samdodge....ebrie_Jesse.jpg
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#3 Mike Williamson

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Posted 11 June 2006 - 02:56 AM

If I'm not mistaken, Riefenstahl worked with Arriflex in developing the first reflex viewing motion picture camera in the 30's. I can't recall where I heard this, can anyone confirm or deny? I know they didn't have production models until the late 40's, and I think Robert Flaherty's "Louisiana Story" was one of the first films to use the new cameras.

As far as "Triumph of the Will", it doesn't look like any of the cameras pictured are the early Arriflex cameras I've seen pictures of, perhaps they were being used on "Olympia", again I'm not sure.
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#4 Hal Smith

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Posted 11 June 2006 - 03:14 AM

If I'm not mistaken, Riefenstahl worked with Arriflex in developing the first reflex viewing motion picture camera in the 30's.

So we now have both "Commiecams" and "Nazicams"? :D
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#5 dd3stp233

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Posted 11 June 2006 - 07:20 AM

The one in the first photo looks like a 1920's Lytax by Lapparatebau but it is hard to tell. The camera on the left of the second picture looks a lot like a Prevost, made in France.
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#6 Matt Butler

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Posted 12 June 2006 - 05:43 AM

Thanks for your respective research.

I guess the structure of this film allowed the use of hand-held 100' load cameras ( eg. the operator on the fire engine ladder in picture #3), and compact 400' load cameras ( pictures 1 and 2). to get into the action of the Nuremburg rally.

It was a *music video* style film of its time, except the editors cut the many images to martial music, various Wagnerian themes, intercut with political speeches.

Thanks again
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#7 Dan Salzmann

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Posted 12 June 2006 - 10:14 AM

I'll bet she had full cooperation from the Zeiss R&D team for any wide angle optics as well as any other suppliers considering who the producer's were.
The Reichstaag and Brandenburg gate look a lot smaller in real life than in her films.
I believe Arriflex IIA's were used as cameras on Messerschmitts, making it Arriflex vs. Bell & Howell on the camera front.
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#8 Leo Anthony Vale

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Posted 12 June 2006 - 04:08 PM

Here is a real left field question - (or should that be right field?)

Recently viewed a re-mastered DVD copy of this film from our local video shop and wondered what type of 35mm cine cameras they employed in those days in Germany?

googling wasn't much help, but came across this site with some production stills.

http://rubens.anu.ed...enstahl/triumph

Any idea of make of cameras featured in the first thee photo's?


---The first frame is a Debrie Parvo, The one on the right is also a parvo. i'll go along with the other being a prevost. I think the third picture is a press camera rether than a cine camera.

Here's an askania, basically a german knock off off a debrie parvo, but has a brushed aluminum trim, compared to the debrie's leather trim, and a unique matte box:

http://www.uta.fi/fe...emuvoittoen.htm

This is from 'Olympiad':

http://www.movieman-...?/filme/a-z/C8/

a first glance it appears to be an eyemo, but look at the viewfinder. It's on the back directly behind the lens. So the operators is viewing directly on the film, like the parvo and askania.

Ther are more shots of it and other behind the scenes footage and stills in 'The Wonderful, horrible life of Leni Riefenstahl'. And she's such a lively and entertaining old woman.

Mit askania:

http://www.dasblauel....net/OC 654.htm

Mit Debrie Parvo:

http://www.dasblauel...net/OC 6543.htm

An Unknown sound kamera:

http://www.dasblauel.../OC 6654321.htm

Definitely not a super parvo.

Heres some stuff about 'The wonderful, horrible life...':

http://www.dvdbeaver...riefenstahl.htm

und ja, Leni likes muscular black bodies.

Ineresting picture filled site about die schoenische Leni:

http://www.dasblauel...new_page_96.htm


As to arri IIAs. those are 50s cameras. Even the 35II is post war.
'Triumph'. is still to early for arris, maybe 'Olympia'.

Messerschmittss? Land based combat photographers, sure.

---LV
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#9 Jody Custer

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Posted 27 June 2006 - 10:46 PM

Hear her answer these questions of filmmaking herself and see,
"The Wonderful, Horrible Life of Leni Riefenstahl" (1994) on DVD
From the cinematographer perspective she tells the exact nature of technical detail in her work.
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