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The right codec for a demo reel


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#1 Stephen Whitehead

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Posted 11 June 2006 - 12:46 PM

Hello, I am trying to compress my demo reel. it is about 4 minutes long, and I want it to be under 10 megs, all the codecs I am using seem to leave far too many compression artifacts. Does anyone have a recomendation as to the best codec and settings to compress my reel with? also what frame rate would be best?

Cheers,

Steve Whitehead

Edited by Stephen Whitehead, 11 June 2006 - 12:46 PM.

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#2 Adam Frisch FSF

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Posted 11 June 2006 - 02:04 PM

I compress everything with the new H264 codec - it creates the leanest and highest quality compressions of any codec. Only problem is you the viewer needs the QT 7.0 or higher, but most have that anyway - and those few who don't have it are technophobes who still use Win98...

A well compressed Sorenson3 can also be an alternative, bur Sorenson is an old codec now - don't think Sorenson has updated it at all during the last 5-7 years.
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#3 Miguel Bunster

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Posted 11 June 2006 - 05:20 PM

H264 is good but I still get problems. It lowers the contrast specially bringing up blacks and lowers saturation as well...
Miguel
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#4 Michael Most

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Posted 11 June 2006 - 06:24 PM

Hello, I am trying to compress my demo reel. it is about 4 minutes long, and I want it to be under 10 megs, all the codecs I am using seem to leave far too many compression artifacts. Does anyone have a recomendation as to the best codec and settings to compress my reel with? also what frame rate would be best?


You haven't stated whether you're on a Mac or a PC, or where your compressed file is going - on a website, being emailed, FTP'd, going on CD or DVD media, etc. All of these things influence what you can or "should" use. My own experience has been that by far the best quality at the lowest data rate is achieved by Windows Media. A good alternative if you're on a Macintosh is H264, but it will require all viewers to have Quicktime 7.
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#5 Stephen Whitehead

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Posted 11 June 2006 - 09:40 PM

Basically what I am doing is posting the file on the web, to be viewed by potential employers. so I think under 10 megs is pretty important.
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#6 Chad Stockfleth

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Posted 11 June 2006 - 10:07 PM

I've had decent luck exporting quicktimes into compressor and using Mpeg-1 for the web.

4 minutes is a bit long for a demo reel... if you could cut it down a bit...say 2 minutes, then you could certainly get a higher quality/lower-res file.
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