Jump to content


16mm Telecine


  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 Christopher Wedding

Christopher Wedding
  • Guests

Posted 14 June 2006 - 06:05 PM

Hey guys,

I need some quick advice and I promise that I have done a search for these things...

If I'm shooting 320T 7277, which is a low contrasty stock that I think is good for telecine work, then should I still overexpose by 2/3rds of a stop and 'print' down later? I don't have a lot of time (read money) for telecine so I want to make sure that this is the best thing to do (but if I SHOULD do it, I'll do it). I know I don't have to do it, but I wasn't sure if a denser negative is still good to have for a telecine process.

Also, I'm getting the transfer done in LA. Does anyone know of any modest houses that still do good work. I read a different string and K. Zanit mentioned Modern Film and Video, but I can't seem to find their number in the LA411. I talked with Fotokem and they are 275/hour which still freaks my producers out a bit. However we're hoping to only have about 3000 ft (it's a music video) and the guy at Fotokem said it would take 6 hours if we supervise. That sounded accurate, what do you think/what are your experiences?

Oh yeah, and we're considering the straight to hard drive option if anyone knows of a house that does this. However, the good 'ole DigiBeta route is fine as well.

Thanks for any advice.
  • 0

#2 Alex Ardenti

Alex Ardenti
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 56 posts
  • Director
  • Los Angeles

Posted 14 June 2006 - 08:02 PM

I just got back from Fotokem minutes ago.

I can't answer your first question but they told me that they can definitely put my 16mm footage directly on hard drive. The only other place in L.A. that has been highly reccomended for this is Encore in Hollywood.

I'm in a similar situation and they suggested to snip each 400' roll and push or pull accordingly. They then can scan the negative directly on my harddrive in their building next door. This might cut down on telecine time later.

The $275 per hour on telecine at Fotokem sounds like a good deal actually. I was preparing myself for $500 an hour.

Hope some of this helps.

Good luck.

Alex

www.alexardenti.com
  • 0

#3 Christopher Wedding

Christopher Wedding
  • Guests

Posted 14 June 2006 - 08:32 PM

I just got back from Fotokem minutes ago.

I'm in a similar situation and they suggested to snip each 400' roll and push or pull accordingly. They then can scan the negative directly on my harddrive in their building next door. This might cut down on telecine time later.


Alex,

Who did you speak with about that?

Not sure what you mean snip the 400' roll?

Thanks
  • 0

#4 Alex Ardenti

Alex Ardenti
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 56 posts
  • Director
  • Los Angeles

Posted 14 June 2006 - 08:35 PM

His name was Mark. Very helpful guy.
He said they can scan the neg to a hard drive.

He suggested I do a snip test on each roll of film I dropped off.

Alex

www.alexardenti.com
  • 0

#5 Michael Nash

Michael Nash
  • Sustaining Members
  • 3330 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Pasadena, CA

Posted 15 June 2006 - 01:09 AM

In general you don't want to overexpose your neg too much for telecine. Somtimes you can get video noise from areas that are too dense, i.e. hot whites and very saturated colors. As a rule of thumb I only go about 1/3-2/3 over at most for telecine. In my experience 7277 looks great when "goosed" a little bit, and since it's mild in contrast there's usually alot of midtone to reveal grain. 2/3 over should be good.

Along with the rate you need to look into what machine(s) they're using. A good telecine (and good colorist) can make or break the look of your 16mm stuff, regardless of rate. $275 doesn't sound like an outrageous rate to me, but there are of course deals out there.
  • 0

#6 Christopher Wedding

Christopher Wedding
  • Guests

Posted 15 June 2006 - 04:25 AM

Any machines in particular? Spirit or a DaVinci good....any that should def be avoided?

Thanks Michael and Alex for the help.

Chris
  • 0

#7 Michael Most

Michael Most
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 765 posts
  • Other

Posted 15 June 2006 - 07:03 AM

Along with the rate you need to look into what machine(s) they're using. A good telecine (and good colorist) can make or break the look of your 16mm stuff, regardless of rate. $275 doesn't sound like an outrageous rate to me, but there are of course deals out there.


Anyone doing this for less than $275 is not using "a good telecine and a good colorist."

People need to understand reality. Reality is that a telecine installation, especially based on a Spirit and a DaVinci (the "standard," particularly in L.A., for high end work), complete with monitoring, proper environment, and connections to the rest of the facility, costs somewhere between $1.75 and $2 million. Selling that room for even $275 per hour is basically giving it away, and anything less is losing money. Things cost what they cost, if you want them done right. If you can't afford it, you can't do it, and therefore need to look at other alternatives.
  • 0


Opal

Abel Cine

Visual Products

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Paralinx LLC

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Rig Wheels Passport

Willys Widgets

Metropolis Post

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Glidecam

CineLab

Tai Audio

Technodolly

The Slider

Ritter Battery

Wooden Camera

FJS International, LLC

rebotnix Technologies

CineTape

Aerial Filmworks

CineLab

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Willys Widgets

rebotnix Technologies

Aerial Filmworks

Wooden Camera

Paralinx LLC

Ritter Battery

Technodolly

The Slider

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Visual Products

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Opal

Glidecam

Rig Wheels Passport

Abel Cine

Tai Audio

FJS International, LLC

Metropolis Post

CineTape