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LIGHTING THE FOREST!


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#1 Evan Cox

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Posted 15 June 2006 - 02:08 PM

Hey there! I was just wondering if anybody had any particular tricks for lighting in the woods: simulating the sun, keeping shadows away, keeping faces well-lit. How many lights am I going to need. Any help would, consequently, help. Thanks a lot.
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#2 Stuart Brereton

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Posted 15 June 2006 - 02:32 PM

It's difficult to answer your question without knowing what kind of look you want, what sort of shots you are after - wide med close etc. Is it a sunny day in the forest, or a moonlit night?

your lighting choices are dictated by script and budget. What do you want to do? What can you afford to do?
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#3 Evan Cox

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Posted 15 June 2006 - 03:32 PM

It's difficult to answer your question without knowing what kind of look you want, what sort of shots you are after - wide med close etc. Is it a sunny day in the forest, or a moonlit night?

your lighting choices are dictated by script and budget. What do you want to do? What can you afford to do?


It's a fairly tight budget. I'll need night and day scenes, not super-sunny days, just daytime days (overcast maybe). Generally, I'm just looking for set-ups and techniques for keeping the scene and the actors lit.
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#4 Stuart Brereton

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Posted 15 June 2006 - 04:19 PM

It's a fairly tight budget. I'll need night and day scenes, not super-sunny days, just daytime days (overcast maybe). Generally, I'm just looking for set-ups and techniques for keeping the scene and the actors lit.



Well, it depends on what 'fairly tight budget' means, but assuming that it means low budget, for your day exteriors you should use available light in the wide shots as much as possible, then hire in some small HMIs (.575, 1.2k etc) to give yourself some control in the closeups.

For night scenes, it's more difficult. You don't have natural light to help you out. Unless you can afford to rent some big lamps you are going to have to restrict your shot size, and try to control how much of the background is seen.
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#5 Bob Hayes

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Posted 16 June 2006 - 04:14 PM

I am always surprised how much light shooting in a forest and especially jungle takes. You often need to use high speed stock in full daylight. I find myself banging lights into dark BG?s all the time. If you have no budget I?d look into using mirror boards so you can find those small shafts of light and send them where you need them.. Also use may thing about using smoke, not one that will cause a fire, to open the shadows up a bit. Smoke looks great in back lot day scenes.
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Glidecam

Visual Products

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Opal

Rig Wheels Passport

Technodolly

CineLab

Willys Widgets

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

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