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dealing with fluorescents


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#1 igus mikler

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Posted 16 June 2006 - 11:22 AM

Hi!
I am going to shoot a hallway with fluorescents, and need to know what to set the shutter for on the panasonic dvx-100a (NTSC), going on 24p to eliminate flickering? Also will shoot a computer screen. Advise would be appreciated. Am also interested in knowing the equivalent for Pal settings for future reference.
cheers.
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 16 June 2006 - 11:59 AM

If you are shooting in a 60 Hz country like the U.S., then 1/60th of a second is optimal but 1/48th will work. In a 50 Hz country, then 1/50th of a second, but 1/25th will work.

Computer monitors are all over the map. If it's an LCD screen, then pretty much anything will work. For a CRT computer screen, you have to experiment with the camera's shutter speed to remove the flicker. I believe the camera allows adjustments in hertz or percentages (ECS or "Clear Scan"). Check your manual.
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#3 igus mikler

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Posted 16 June 2006 - 07:09 PM

this is all very helpful!!! thanks!!:)
I only have a last question(s)- What do you regularly set the shutter to when shooting regular tungsten or daylight- 1/60 as well, while shooting 24fps? when I shoot 30p I have it set to 1/60 by default so am wondering what is correct?
shooting sport where there is running or an action scene I set the shutter to 1/250 to get that stutter, more sharper image, is there a nother more typical shutter speed to set it to?
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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 16 June 2006 - 07:29 PM

I usually use 1/48th or 1/32nd when shooting 24P, but 1/60th isn't going to look all that different than 1/48th.

1/100th would be close to the look of a 90 degree shutter angle at 24 fps, and 1/200th would be close to the look of a 45 degree shutter angle, so it would depend on how much strobing / jerkiness I wanted for the action scene. I tend to use 90 degrees if I do that at all (usually I leave the shutter alone) because I think 45 degrees is too obvious.
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#5 igus mikler

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Posted 16 June 2006 - 11:56 PM

ok, so I am all set with the shutter speed 1/60 as I shoot in progressive mode 24p. so how does the synchro scan fit in in all of this? I notice that the shutter speed you cant set to 1/48 on the panasonic 100A (goes 1/24 then 1/60) but you can set the synchro scan to 1/48. so is this what you are talking about? or do I set the shutter speed to 1/60 and the syncro scan to 1/60 aswell. I am a bit confused, hope you can set this straight for me.. (is this only when shooting televisions or goes for fluorescent light aswell?)
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#6 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 17 June 2006 - 12:35 AM

Someone who owns the camera should talk to you, but you can only set one shutter speed at a time, so if you set it to 1/48th using the synchro scan, then it's at 1/48th.
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#7 Shane Bartlett

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Posted 29 June 2006 - 08:53 AM

ok, so I am all set with the shutter speed 1/60 as I shoot in progressive mode 24p. so how does the synchro scan fit in in all of this? I notice that the shutter speed you cant set to 1/48 on the panasonic 100A (goes 1/24 then 1/60) but you can set the synchro scan to 1/48. so is this what you are talking about? or do I set the shutter speed to 1/60 and the syncro scan to 1/60 aswell. I am a bit confused, hope you can set this straight for me.. (is this only when shooting televisions or goes for fluorescent light aswell?)



The syncro scan function is for shooting computer monitors, etc, and allows you to fine-adjust the shutter. I've found that if you adjust the syncro scan into the neighborhood of the monitor's refresh rate, you will get a flicker-free image. Of course, once you've set the syncro scan, the entire clip will be shot using that shutter speed. When you're finished, you will have to change the syncro scan again.

--Shane
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