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Circular Polarizer


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#1 Ken Maskrey

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Posted 18 June 2006 - 12:28 AM

I saw some discussion of circular vs linear polarizers in another section, but it seemed to center around the use of autofocusing, etc. For 35mm, what would be the difference between using a linear vs circular polarized filters -- not the technical description, per se -- moreso, why or when to use which for what in 35mm film cameras (not still photography).
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#2 Stephen Williams

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Posted 18 June 2006 - 03:51 AM

I saw some discussion of circular vs linear polarizers in another section, but it seemed to center around the use of autofocusing, etc. For 35mm, what would be the difference between using a linear vs circular polarized filters -- not the technical description, per se -- moreso, why or when to use which for what in 35mm film cameras (not still photography).


Hi,

If you have a video assist you will need a circular one!

Stephen
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#3 Tim O'Connor

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Posted 23 June 2006 - 03:39 PM

Hi,

If you have a video assist you will need a circular one!

Stephen


Why? Is it because of auto-focus on the video assist camera? Thanks.
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#4 Stephen Williams

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Posted 23 June 2006 - 04:21 PM

Why? Is it because of auto-focus on the video assist camera? Thanks.


Hi,

As you turn the polarizer the video picture goes black, so the video camera must be polorised.

Stephen
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#5 Tim O'Connor

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Posted 24 June 2006 - 06:25 PM

Hi,

As you turn the polarizer the video picture goes black, so the video camera must be polorised.

Stephen


Good to know! Thanks.
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#6 Tim J Durham

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Posted 25 June 2006 - 10:29 AM

Hi,

As you turn the polarizer the video picture goes black, so the video camera must be polorised.

Stephen


Hmm,
I've used a linear polariser on video cameras for years and never had the picture go black. I prefer them because you can put the filter in with either side facing out and it will work. The only downside I know of is if you are using auto-focus, which it defeats in some instances.

In the stills world, if your camera has either TTL metering or auto-focus, they recommend a circular, but that's the only restriction I know of.
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#7 Stephen Williams

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Posted 25 June 2006 - 11:20 AM

Hmm,
I've used a linear polariser on video cameras for years and never had the picture go black.


Hi,

I have had video assist cameras viewing through a beamsplitter go very dark with a linear poloriser.
Also with old tube video cameras like a BVP 3 (circa 1986) everything went black for sure, thats when I started using circular ones!

Stephen
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