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Is Los Angeles the Capital of Super-8 in the Digital Age?


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#1 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 20 June 2006 - 05:30 AM

Just thought I'd take a moment and remind the internet community that Los Angeles boasts four Super-8 Rank Cintel facilities in the San Fernando Valley alone. Pro-8mm, Yale, Spectra Film & Video, and Film & Video Transfers.

Additionally, there is at least one Shadow or Spirit super-8 transfer facility, and probably a couple more Rank Cintel facilities sprinkled throughout Hollywood and the surrounding communities that occasionally will rent the Super-8 gate. I assume Rank Cintel (located not too far away from Los Angeles) is still providing their Super-8 gate rental service and thusly feeding additional local Rank Cintel transfer houses that don't own their own Super-8 gate but make Super-8 transfers available upon request.

Kodak is located in Hollywood as well! So is Fuji, although they are not selling Super-8 they do provide the opportunity for local Super-8 companies that load their own film to buy bulk so they can slit the film down and load it into Super-8 cartridges.

Also, There are THREE Super-8 LABS in the San Fernando Valley that offer SAME DAY PROCESSING, Yale, Pro-8mm and Spectra Film & Video. So if you've ever thought of visiting Los Angeles you might want to combine your super-8 work projects and vacation all in one.
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#2 Andy_Alderslade

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Posted 20 June 2006 - 05:36 AM

Ha, now you're just rubbing it in.
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#3 Rachel Oliver

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Posted 20 June 2006 - 05:55 AM

So if you've ever thought of visiting Los Angeles you might want to combine your super-8 work projects and vacation all in one.
[/quote]

Hi;

Ahh what a lovely idea

Olly
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#4 Victor Mejia

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Posted 20 June 2006 - 05:53 PM

Just thought I'd take a moment and remind the internet community that Los Angeles boasts four Super-8 Rank Cintel facilities in the San Fernando Valley alone. Pro-8mm, Yale, Spectra Film & Video, and Film & Video Transfers.

Additionally, there is at least one Shadow or Spirit super-8 transfer facility, and probably a couple more Rank Cintel facilities sprinkled throughout Hollywood and the surrounding communities that occasionally will rent the Super-8 gate. I assume Rank Cintel (located not too far away from Los Angeles) is still providing their Super-8 gate rental service and thusly feeding additional local Rank Cintel transfer houses that don't own their own Super-8 gate but make Super-8 transfers available upon request.

Kodak is located in Hollywood as well! So is Fuji, although they are not selling Super-8 they do provide the opportunity for local Super-8 companies that load their own film to buy bulk so they can slit the film down and load it into Super-8 cartridges.

Also, There are THREE Super-8 LABS in the San Fernando Valley that offer SAME DAY PROCESSING, Yale, Pro-8mm and Spectra Film & Video. So if you've ever thought of visiting Los Angeles you might want to combine your super-8 work projects and vacation all in one.


And the best part is that I'm one of the lucky ones who lives in LA. No need to pay for shipping or waiting days for stuff to arrive. I just drive a few minutes in my air-conditioned 2006 Astin Martin--I mean my non-air-conditioned 1997 Dodge Neon. B)
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#5 Tim Halloran

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Posted 21 June 2006 - 01:25 AM

And the best part is that I'm one of the lucky ones who lives in LA.


Hey yolia, going to the Cine Gear Expo this weekend? Looks to be pretty good.

www.cinegearexpo.com

Tim
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#6 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 21 June 2006 - 06:27 AM

Hey yolia, going to the Cine Gear Expo this weekend? Looks to be pretty good.

www.cinegearexpo.com

Tim


Oh man, talk about taking the butter knife and spreading it further. :D
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#7 Victor Mejia

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Posted 21 June 2006 - 06:24 PM

Hey yolia, going to the Cine Gear Expo this weekend? Looks to be pretty good.

www.cinegearexpo.com

Tim


I'm thinking about it. I know pro8 is going to show of their new max/super16 camera--or something like that. But I want to get some shooting done this weekend too. I'm waiting for Spectra to get a new shipment of Velvia 50D. They can't keep that stuff on the shelf, it's so popular. I'm also hoping my Zeiss Ikon Moviflex S8 arrives this week too.
Victor
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#8 Guy Bennett

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Posted 22 June 2006 - 03:14 AM

I also live in L.A., and while I agree that for buying and processing Super 8 film, the situation there is difficult to beat, I find that there is little to nothing happening there in terms of organizations of small gauge film makers, studios where they can work on film projects, and actual screenings of Super 8 films.

I'm currently in Paris, where I spend a few months each year, and there is an extremely dynamic small gauge film making community here, with several associations and collectives actually making and screening Super 8 films on a regular basis. This week alone, for example, there have been screenings every night at L'ETNA, with up to ten Super 8 films projected in one program (in addition to a couple films in 16mm and mini-DV). And this is only one organization; there are several others here that frequently present small gauge films to the public.

Super 8 film and processing is so readily available in L.A. because the US film industry is based there, and I suppose that we should be happy about that. But when it comes to public screenings of small gauge films, which in the end is what it's all about, L.A. simply can't compare with what is happening here.

Frankly, I find the same thing to be true of "large gauge" cinema as well. Whether we're talking about the latest, greatest studio offerings, or "art" films, either old classics or current works, from around the world, the L.A. movie scene, so to speak, is downright poor compared to what you can see in Paris on a regular basis, and I say this as someone who lived his whole life in L.A.

L.A. may be the capital of US cinema, but it is nowhere near as dynamic in terms of actual public screenings of all types of films as the French capital, and the same may be true of other large cities around the world.
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#9 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 22 June 2006 - 12:13 PM

I also live in L.A., and while I agree that for buying and processing Super 8 film, the situation there is difficult to beat, I find that there is little to nothing happening there in terms of organizations of small gauge film makers, studios where they can work on film projects, and actual screenings of Super 8 films.

I'm currently in Paris, where I spend a few months each year, and there is an extremely dynamic small gauge film making community here, with several associations and collectives actually making and screening Super 8 films on a regular basis. This week alone, for example, there have been screenings every night at L'ETNA, with up to ten Super 8 films projected in one program (in addition to a couple films in 16mm and mini-DV). And this is only one organization; there are several others here that frequently present small gauge films to the public.

Super 8 film and processing is so readily available in L.A. because the US film industry is based there, and I suppose that we should be happy about that. But when it comes to public screenings of small gauge films, which in the end is what it's all about, L.A. simply can't compare with what is happening here.

Frankly, I find the same thing to be true of "large gauge" cinema as well. Whether we're talking about the latest, greatest studio offerings, or "art" films, either old classics or current works, from around the world, the L.A. movie scene, so to speak, is downright poor compared to what you can see in Paris on a regular basis, and I say this as someone who lived his whole life in L.A.

L.A. may be the capital of US cinema, but it is nowhere near as dynamic in terms of actual public screenings of all types of films as the French capital, and the same may be true of other large cities around the world.



You bring up excellent sidebar points. I personally am not interested in projecting my super-8 film originals
because ultimately film projection is a "destructive" technology. Norwood Cheek does screen Super-8 and 16mm films or DVD copies of films 2-4 four times a year via LA flicker.

Anybody know of a cool screening location in Los Angles that has built in video projection, nice sound system, theatre style seating for people that have made dvd's of their super-8 projects? If a cool location exists, then the next step of screening Super-8 films becomes much easier.
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#10 Guy Bennett

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Posted 22 June 2006 - 01:19 PM

You bring up excellent sidebar points. I personally am not interested in projecting my super-8 film originals
because ultimately film projection is a "destructive" technology. Norwood Cheek does screen Super-8 and 16mm films or DVD copies of films 2-4 four times a year via LA flicker.

Anybody know of a cool screening location in Los Angles that has built in video projection, nice sound system, theatre style seating for people that have made dvd's of their super-8 projects? If a cool location exists, then the next step of screening Super-8 films becomes much easier.



If the idea is to actually watch the films we're shooting (and if it isn't, then what is?), then the points I'm bringing up are not sidebar points, they are *the* points.

Also, I'm not talking about projecting Super 8 originals vs DVD copies, my point is that in L.A., only one, maybe two places are showing small gauge films, and that just a few times a year, whatever the media. And the other types of organizations -- film collectives and workshops with classes, facilities, etc. -- don't exist at all.
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#11 Tim Halloran

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Posted 22 June 2006 - 01:50 PM

Also, I'm not talking about projecting Super 8 originals vs DVD copies, my point is that in L.A., only one, maybe two places are showing small gauge films, and that just a few times a year, whatever the media. And the other types of organizations -- film collectives and workshops with classes, facilities, etc. -- don't exist at all.

Guy, I guess you're principally referring to the screening schedule (or lack thereof) at the Echo Park Film Center. While the Open Screen is only scheduled quarterly, the microcinema has regular screenings of all kinds of stuff--8mm, 16mm, digital crap, docs, experimental, etc.. I know you're familiar with the place but go look at the microcinema schedule again. Stuff happening virtually every night.

But I still agree with you--I wish there was a lot MORE going on in small format in LA. I've just recently started an 8mm club/shooting group at the University I teach at. We're not quite sure what we're going to be doing yet, but we expect to organize various projects, screenings, and parties, for sure. Any interest (from anyone) in getting together a more expansive LA 8mm "group?"


Anybody know of a cool screening location in Los Angles that has built in video projection, nice sound system, theatre style seating for people that have made dvd's of their super-8 projects? If a cool location exists, then the next step of screening Super-8 films becomes much easier.

Alex, you should review the microcinema facilities at the EPFC as well. I think they fit your bill. Here is the direct link:

http://www.echoparkf...inema/index.htm

Tim
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#12 Guy Bennett

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Posted 22 June 2006 - 03:07 PM

I'm aware of the EPFC, which I'm very happy we have, and its microcinema, which presents some interesting work, though its scheduling is a bit of a mixed bag IMO. And I don't mean to make more of this than I already have, but I guess I'm just surprised that given the place and role of L.A. in the history of cinema, you'd think that there would be more happening there, and that there would be a more dynamic, diverse, and visible scene with respect to small gauge film making.

I'd be curious to hear more about the group you've founded (BTW where do you teach, if you don't mind my asking? [and if you do, no problem]), and also wonder if there might be others in town interested in a small gauge filmmaking group. You never know.
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#13 Tim Halloran

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Posted 22 June 2006 - 04:16 PM

I'd be curious to hear more about the group you've founded (BTW where do you teach, if you don't mind my asking? [and if you do, no problem]), and also wonder if there might be others in town interested in a small gauge filmmaking group. You never know.


Guy, I PM'd with some info but got some odd error message--did you get it? I'll e-mail if you didn't.

Edit: E-mail you? Nevermind. I'll PM you from filmshooting if you didn't get my message from here. If filmshooting ever gets back up. <_<

Tim

Edited by etimh1, 22 June 2006 - 04:20 PM.

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#14 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 22 June 2006 - 09:46 PM

If the idea is to actually watch the films we're shooting (and if it isn't, then what is?), then the points I'm bringing up are not sidebar points, they are *the* points.


The reason I called your comments "'EXCELLENT' sidebar points" is that the purpose of this particular topic was to point out the huge investment in Super-8 related services that currently exist in Los Angeles. If I didn't already live in Southern California I would seriously consider planning a vacation out here and in that week or two time period shoot a super-8 or 16mm film project so that I could take advantage of the same day film processing and transfering services that currently exist in Los Angeles.


......Also, I'm not talking about projecting Super 8 originals vs DVD copies....


But I was, that's why I specifically put the phrase "digital age" in my topic post, to point out all the great services that allow Super-8 to be integrated with digital NLE systems in a very timely manner.


.......my point is that in L.A., only one, maybe two places are showing small gauge films.......


Probably most people don't want to put their film originals through a "destructive technology" since film is more expensive than it used to be. I'm borrowing the phrase "destructive technology" from Mr. Pytlak and others who have used it before. Also, since more and more people are editing digitally, who really wants to see film original dailies. Workprint dailies at least preserve the original, but in super-8 that option is not realistically on the table. That is also why I asked if anyone knew of a place that has been set up to show DVD's in a theatrical type of environment complete with an excellent sound system because in my opinion that would be the first step to creating the type of environment you have said does not exist.

......and the other types of organizations -- film collectives and workshops with classes, facilities, etc. -- don't exist at all.


This I disagree with. LA is a big place, and all types of super-8 endeavors spring up all the time and Echo Park Film Center does a lot with Super-8 as well. I do agree that the overall invisibility of the super-8 filmmaking community in Los Angeles is quite profound and the most logical way to create more of a melting pot for the existing Super-8 filmmaking community would be to rally around a true digital projection theatre with great sound that would accommodate 100 people and that would be affordable to rent out.
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#15 Tim Halloran

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Posted 22 June 2006 - 10:24 PM

who really wants to see film original dailies.

Me.

This is one of the things that some of us are interested in and are trying to preserve. It's an aesthetic and experiential issue related to the phenomenon of watching REAL projected film. Furthermore, the "destruction" that takes place through projection is one of the principal qualities that I want to exhibit in the presentation of my films. I edit manually and choose to project my camera film for this very reason. The interface with your so-called "destructive technology" and the residue that accumulates from this exchange is an essential element in the work.


...rally around a true digital projection theatre...

Yuck.

But that's just my opinion. ;)

Tim
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#16 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 22 June 2006 - 10:44 PM

Me.

This is one of the things that some of us are interested in and are trying to preserve. It's an aesthetic and experiential issue related to the phenomenon of watching REAL projected film. Furthermore, the "destruction" that takes place through projection is one of the principal qualities that I want to exhibit in the presentation of my films. I edit manually and choose to project my camera film for this very reason. The interface with your so-called "destructive technology" and the residue that accumulates from this exchange is an essential element in the work.
Yuck.

But that's just my opinion. ;)

Tim


But if the film lab puts one little nick or dust speck or intermittent blue line in the film original prior to this public sacrificial screening you yearn for, they must die a thousand deaths, just ask the filmmaker whom it's happened to or the lab they raised holy heck at.

Remember I said "film original" dailies. I wouldn't mind looking at 16mm dailies because I know I still have a film original that it came from. I just can't imagine much good coming from me screening a 3 minute film reel of unedited time-exposure footage that took me 30 hours to shoot, and then see it accidentally get scratched, just so others can see it unedited.

However, I did do that very thing when I was in film school, I did it then, but I would never do it now. In my opinion DVD copies of film original footage still looks like film.
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#17 Tim Halloran

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Posted 22 June 2006 - 11:15 PM

But if the film lab puts one little nick or dust speck or intermittent blue line in the film original prior to this public sacrificial screening you yearn for, they must die a thousand deaths, just ask the filmmaker whom it's happened to or the lab they raised holy heck at.


Well, this is an entirely different issue having nothing to do with the creative process on my end. Aside from any unique processing instructions, a lab is supposed to perfom a specific service and if they fail in that they should be held accountable.

I really do understand your point Alex and I realize that my interests and needs are part of a minority community and agenda. For all the reasons you stated, NLE editing and digital exhibition will surely continue to flourish and dominate.

Tim

Edited by etimh1, 22 June 2006 - 11:16 PM.

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#18 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 23 June 2006 - 01:01 AM

Well, this is an entirely different issue having nothing to do with the creative process on my end. Aside from any unique processing instructions, a lab is supposed to perfom a specific service and if they fail in that they should be held accountable.

I really do understand your point Alex and I realize that my interests and needs are part of a minority community and agenda. For all the reasons you stated, NLE editing and digital exhibition will surely continue to flourish and dominate.

Tim


I just thought I'd mention the irony of being a lab and dealing with lab mistakes. The best a lab can do is not get noticed, anything short of that and it's heck to pay. Now imagine the person giving them heck for a lab error who is then going to project the film and edit on a movie viewer.

Yikes!

By the way, some of the most enjoyable times I had in Super-8 was when I was in college and would set a goal of shooting one cartridge of film between Friday afternoon and Monday morning, I would then bring the film to a local photo retailer called "Delsons" on Monday before the Kodak messenger would arrive. On Thursday I would then pick up my gorgeous looking Kodachrome that had been processed at the Kodak lab in Hollywood on the best Kodachrome processing machine ever made, then screen it for the first time at our College Film Club meetings on Friday afternoon.

It was kind of like having a Flicker moment every week because I never knew how what I had shot would come out yet I would see it for the first time with others.
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