Jump to content


Photo

Breaking in to the Industry


  • Please log in to reply
21 replies to this topic

#1 JamesJJ

JamesJJ
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 13 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 20 June 2006 - 07:01 AM

Im new to cinematography and from Australia. I have a Masters in Film and have made several short films myself. I have done a short course at AFTRS and I have worked on a couple of features as a camera assistant, but im finding it hard to get more work. Alot of ppl have said i have a great resume and for some roles am over qualified, but having said that i need to get out there and shoot, work with and work on more films. What are peoples thoughts in breaking in to this industry. Are there any websites out there that are looking for hardworking qualified people. Should i do more courses, read more books. Its been about 6 months since i finished my degree so im starting to get impatient. Anyone have any ideas or thoughts. Help would be appricated.

Thanks

HallofFame
  • 0

#2 Ram Shani

Ram Shani
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 735 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • isreal

Posted 20 June 2006 - 02:27 PM

hi

why you dont sign with your name????

plase do like all of us

you can look at mandy.com

and if you googel you will find more sites

good luck
  • 0

#3 Rik Andino

Rik Andino
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 783 posts
  • Electrician
  • New York City

Posted 20 June 2006 - 03:53 PM

Its been about 6 months since i finished my degree so im starting to get impatient.
Anyone have any ideas or thoughts. Help would be appricated.


Maybe you should change careers.
6 months is nothing...
To become a cinematographer you might have to struggle for years...
If you're already impatient now, imagine six years from now.

You can do two things right now...
The 1st is try to get on big-budget productions as an intern or PA
And then you can work your way up the ladder till you reach your goal.
This is something that is very common.

The 2nd is work on your reel and try to land any cinematography job you can.
That means you'll have to shoot student films, and low-budget features or shorts
It also means working for free most of the time
And not having the right equipment or proper environment or great crew...etc...
Sooner or later you'll reel will get better though and you'll get better work.

Making it in the film industry is a slow process
You've gotta be patient if you hope on gaining success.


Good Luck
  • 0

#4 Aaron_Farrugia

Aaron_Farrugia
  • Guests

Posted 20 June 2006 - 07:44 PM

this is pretty interesting also as i am from australia and i am coming towards the end of my film school as well

where in australia are you located?
i was thinking of applying for some aftrs shotrt courses but wasnt sure were they good?
  • 0

#5 JamesJJ

JamesJJ
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 13 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 20 June 2006 - 08:22 PM

Thanks for some of the info. Keep it comming. I also have worked on student films and other films for free already but even they dont come up very often and what do you do to suplement you income. A part time job. I do realise it is a slow process and i am prepared to put years into this in order to become successful but at the same time i do need to earn some money also. I cant keep working for free.

I would recommend doing any AFTRS short course. I did mine on creative coverage and it was brilliant. We got taught by Jan Kenny ACS. She has work on several films with the Legendary John Seale ACS. Also im from Sydney.

What about overseas would people say that the industry is easier to get into abroad. Any thoughts.

James
  • 0

#6 Dajan Bozanic

Dajan Bozanic
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 29 posts
  • Student
  • Western Australia

Posted 21 June 2006 - 02:24 AM

well you r in a better position than me. Im in perth and there is no industry here that i know of. I finished my course in 2003. I work 2 jobs and am saving for a short film to direct myself (ultimately i am more interested in directing than cinematography). Its a tough road. I hear Phillip Noyce is going to shoot a feature with heath Ledger near where I live this year, could be an opportunity to get on a real set.

but how to...
  • 0

#7 Richard Boddington

Richard Boddington
  • Sustaining Members
  • 5482 posts
  • Director

Posted 21 June 2006 - 09:47 AM

"What about overseas would people say that the industry is easier to get into abroad. Any thoughts."

Then I suggest you move to Wellington NZ, it's the new world capital of the film industry.

Plus NZ is a much nicer country than Australia. It's lush and green, Australia is hot and full of nasty spiders and snakes. Plus I hear NZ is much bigger than Australia and has a much better rugby team.

R,
  • 0

#8 Arnaud M. St Martin de Veyran

Arnaud M. St Martin de Veyran
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 78 posts
  • Gaffer
  • Paris

Posted 21 June 2006 - 03:41 PM

Hi Guys !

Jumping into the topics to ask a question to Richard Boddington

I'm a French Gaffer and i'm actullay thinking to move to New Zealand.
I'm wondering wich city is the best to break into the real film industry out there ? Wellington or Auckland ?

Are you from NZ or from Australia ?

Thanks in advance.
  • 0

#9 peter delaney

peter delaney

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts
  • Student

Posted 21 June 2006 - 04:46 PM

Hi,

I'm just new to this site. I saw your post and had to reply to it. I'm from Ireland. I've just finished a 4 year media arts course. My ambition is to be a cinematographer. I didn't get a masters course in London I applied for but I'll try again next year with a better showreel. Fortunately the film industry here is picking up, but it will take some time to get a break. I have a few contacts, so hopefully that will help. I'm second unit camera op. on an extremely low budget feature starting next week, looking forward to that. Ive been worried about getting a break too, and I know that it'll take time to get. If you love what you do, then you have to persevere and something will come along time. Then your career will have begun.

Keep trying and best of luck getting your career started.
  • 0

#10 Richard Boddington

Richard Boddington
  • Sustaining Members
  • 5482 posts
  • Director

Posted 21 June 2006 - 07:39 PM

No sorry, I'm not from either Australia or NZ, I'm in Canada.

I was pointing out to the Australian that NZ appears to have a thriving feature film industy thanks to Peter Jackson. And making fun of Auzzie at the same time.

I did live in NZ for two years though, so I would say it's not that big of a deal whether you locate in Wellington or Auckland for work, you can drive between the two cities. They are both on the North Island. Not close, but you can drive it.

R,
  • 0

#11 JamesJJ

JamesJJ
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 13 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 21 June 2006 - 08:36 PM

Thankyou all for the positive and humorous responses. If anyone else would like to post please do so. I know for one the UK has lots of jobs in film so it shouldnt be a problem to get a job there. So does American. However i was thinking of staying closer to home if i can help it. NZ might be a good choice.
  • 0

#12 Richard Boddington

Richard Boddington
  • Sustaining Members
  • 5482 posts
  • Director

Posted 21 June 2006 - 09:23 PM

I assume you know you can't just show up in LA and tell US immigration you're there to work in movies. They'll be turning you around and sending you back to Auzzie. Work permits can take years. Your best bet is a H1B but you need an US employer to hire you full time, unless you're amazing that is unlikely to happen.

Even better, go to the US as a visitor and marry an American (if you're single). That is the fastest and easiest way. Find some 50 year old single woman, chat her up, marry her, divorce her once you have your green card. You're in the clear smile.gif

R,
  • 0

#13 Brian Wells

Brian Wells
  • Sustaining Members
  • 438 posts
  • Other

Posted 22 June 2006 - 12:00 AM

"I know for one the UK has lots of jobs in film so it shouldnt be a problem to get a job there."

Sure hope Phil doesn't get wind of that! B)
  • 0

#14 Ram Shani

Ram Shani
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 735 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • isreal

Posted 22 June 2006 - 02:25 PM

mybe i am mambel jambel but what abuot hong kong

it got to have big industry


am i wrong???
  • 0

#15 Richard Boddington

Richard Boddington
  • Sustaining Members
  • 5482 posts
  • Director

Posted 22 June 2006 - 04:05 PM

Actually don't forget the biggest film industry in the world, INDIA.

R,
  • 0

#16 Brian Wells

Brian Wells
  • Sustaining Members
  • 438 posts
  • Other

Posted 24 June 2006 - 03:25 AM

I feel like the last generations "DP" who once held the power over all photography is quickly changing hands to the new leader: The Animator. This person has the ultimate power to manipulate. While that has nothing to do with cinematography, it might be a viable career path. I know several animators who shoot "on-the-side" and are very good at it. So, it's not an either/or thing. You can do both, but may find more immediate financial success on the post side of things. Seems like there are always job opportunities available in post production -- particularly for editors who are also skilled at the various types of compositing. The barrier to entry of node based compositing (Apple Shake) dropped $2,500.00 earlier this week. At the new price, $499.00, it's actually cheaper than some of the plug-ins it includes! All that to say this: If your goal is to work "in the industry" then at least consider learning some skills that production companies need. Photographers are dime a dozen.
  • 0

#17 JamesJJ

JamesJJ
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 13 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 24 June 2006 - 07:24 PM

I feel like the last generations "DP" who once held the power over all photography is quickly changing hands to the new leader: The Animator. This person has the ultimate power to manipulate. While that has nothing to do with cinematography, it might be a viable career path. I know several animators who shoot "on-the-side" and are very good at it. So, it's not an either/or thing. You can do both, but may find more immediate financial success on the post side of things. Seems like there are always job opportunities available in post production -- particularly for editors who are also skilled at the various types of compositing. The barrier to entry of node based compositing (Apple Shake) dropped $2,500.00 earlier this week. At the new price, $499.00, it's actually cheaper than some of the plug-ins it includes! All that to say this: If your goal is to work "in the industry" then at least consider learning some skills that production companies need. Photographers are dime a dozen.



Interesting thanks for that. Yes i don know a little bit about Maya and Shake, photoshop etc. My first degree was IT. The ironic thing is i made a career change because i didnt want to be stuck behind a desk all day. I love getting outdoors and shooting. So i did a Masters in Film and love it tremendiously. As for traveling overseas I have a duel passport which allows me to work in the UK indefenitely and Australia. Plus i have a 10 year American Visa. Trouble is i would like to stay in Australia if i can help it.
  • 0

#18 Richard Boddington

Richard Boddington
  • Sustaining Members
  • 5482 posts
  • Director

Posted 24 June 2006 - 09:38 PM

"Plus i have a 10 year American Visa"

That's a VISA that allows you to VISIT the USA during that window. It does not allow you to legally work there, that's a different set of head aches and hurdles all together.

R,
  • 0

#19 JamesJJ

JamesJJ
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 13 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 25 June 2006 - 08:20 PM

"Plus i have a 10 year American Visa"

That's a VISA that allows you to VISIT the USA during that window. It does not allow you to legally work there, that's a different set of head aches and hurdles all together.

R,


I should have said 10 year working visa. I worked in the US for a period of 6 months about 2 years ago but they gave me a working visa for 10 years.
  • 0

#20 Richard Boddington

Richard Boddington
  • Sustaining Members
  • 5482 posts
  • Director

Posted 25 June 2006 - 08:48 PM

Then you should have stayed, what where you thinking?

R,
  • 0


Opal

Ritter Battery

FJS International, LLC

Visual Products

Rig Wheels Passport

CineLab

Metropolis Post

CineTape

Paralinx LLC

Aerial Filmworks

Willys Widgets

Tai Audio

Technodolly

Wooden Camera

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Abel Cine

rebotnix Technologies

The Slider

Glidecam

Willys Widgets

rebotnix Technologies

Visual Products

CineLab

Abel Cine

Rig Wheels Passport

Paralinx LLC

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Metropolis Post

Aerial Filmworks

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Ritter Battery

Tai Audio

Technodolly

Glidecam

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Opal

The Slider

FJS International, LLC

Wooden Camera

CineTape