Jump to content


Photo

Subway advertisements-moving pictures


  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

#1 Robert Hughes

Robert Hughes
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 873 posts
  • Sound Department
  • Minneapolis

Posted 21 June 2006 - 07:15 PM

I was on the subway in Washington, DC today. On the Red Line heading east of Gallery Place there is an ad for Lincoln, or Lexus, or some car - in between stations, on the walls of the subway tube. Multiple frames with some sort of reflective grating that lets you see a movie by riding past this sign and looking out the window.

How did they create this sign? Is anybody acquainted with the technique?
  • 0

#2 Alessandro Machi

Alessandro Machi
  • Sustaining Members
  • 3318 posts
  • Other
  • California

Posted 21 June 2006 - 07:25 PM

I was on the subway in Washington, DC today. On the Red Line heading east of Gallery Place there is an ad for Lincoln, or Lexus, or some car - in between stations, on the walls of the subway tube. Multiple frames with some sort of reflective grating that lets you see a movie by riding past this sign and looking out the window.

How did they create this sign? Is anybody acquainted with the technique?


I had an idea like that a long time ago, but then again, it does have limited applications. I assume the train has to be moving at a certain speed for the effect to work correctly???

I wonder where they practiced the idea before trotting it out for the public.
  • 0

#3 timHealy

timHealy
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1252 posts
  • Other
  • New York

Posted 21 June 2006 - 08:14 PM

The PATH system in NYC and NJ has had this for a few years:


Some links with a description about it but I don't see any tech specs.

http://www.sub-media...o/PATH_NBC4.mpg
http://adverlab.blog...dvertising.html
http://www.sub-media.com/index.html

Best

Tim
  • 0

#4 Leo Anthony Vale

Leo Anthony Vale
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2010 posts
  • Other
  • Pittsburgh PA

Posted 22 June 2006 - 01:25 PM

How did they create this sign? Is anybody acquainted with the technique?


---It's the same principle as the zoetrope:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zoetrope

http://www.groeg.de/...s/zoetrope.html

---LV
  • 0

#5 Robert Goodrich

Robert Goodrich
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 23 posts
  • Director

Posted 22 June 2006 - 02:02 PM

There used to be one in the early nineties, on the D train as it left Brooklyn heading for Manhattan. It was a completely hand-painted animation of a moving geometric pattern. Very impressive.

It was a nice little visual treat as I headed in to work every morning.
  • 0

#6 Robert Hughes

Robert Hughes
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 873 posts
  • Sound Department
  • Minneapolis

Posted 22 June 2006 - 05:05 PM

I saw it again today, front and back. It's backlit with multiple fluorescent tubes. According to one of the abovementioned links, the sign is printed on some sort of Kodak transparency sheeting. John Pytlak or any Kodak-ites out there care to explain what this sheeting is that allows for this effect?
  • 0

#7 Michael Nash

Michael Nash
  • Sustaining Members
  • 3330 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Pasadena, CA

Posted 22 June 2006 - 05:41 PM

I haven't seen the thing in real life -- is it some kind of ribbed surface that limits the viewing angle? I mean, you have to provide some kind of "shutter" to see each frame as a still image and not just a blur.
  • 0

#8 Sam Wells

Sam Wells
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1751 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 22 June 2006 - 06:05 PM

There used to be one in the early nineties, on the D train as it left Brooklyn heading for Manhattan. It was a completely hand-painted animation of a moving geometric pattern. Very impressive.

It was a nice little visual treat as I headed in to work every morning.


By Bill Brand. Very cool.

-Sam
  • 0

#9 Stephen Williams

Stephen Williams
  • Sustaining Members
  • 4708 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Europe

Posted 23 June 2006 - 02:21 AM

I wonder where they practiced the idea before trotting it out for the public.


Hi,

About 6 years ago a Swatch commercial I shot was shown in a train tunnel near Bern, Switzerland. Every frame was printed and fixed to the side if the tunnel, strobe lights were used below each frame.
I am trying to find 'The making of' as I can't remember all the technical details. The train had to be going at a constant speed to work properly. I think the project cost about $1,000,000. Swatch got a huge amount of TV coverage at the time.

Stephen
  • 0

#10 Alessandro Machi

Alessandro Machi
  • Sustaining Members
  • 3318 posts
  • Other
  • California

Posted 23 June 2006 - 03:50 AM

Hi,

About 6 years ago a Swatch commercial I shot was shown in a train tunnel near Bern, Switzerland. Every frame was printed and fixed to the side if the tunnel, strobe lights were used below each frame.
I am trying to find 'The making of' as I can't remember all the technical details. The train had to be going at a constant speed to work properly. I think the project cost about $1,000,000. Swatch got a huge amount of TV coverage at the time.

Stephen


So can we assume that somewhere in the world exists an expert or a specialist that makes their entire living by creating these moving commercials and they been doing it for the last 20 years? What a unique gig.

Congrats on having your work literally plastered in Switzerland.
  • 0


Paralinx LLC

Glidecam

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

CineTape

The Slider

rebotnix Technologies

Technodolly

Willys Widgets

Tai Audio

Opal

Metropolis Post

Wooden Camera

Ritter Battery

Rig Wheels Passport

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Abel Cine

Aerial Filmworks

Broadcast Solutions Inc

FJS International, LLC

Visual Products

CineLab

Visual Products

Opal

Metropolis Post

Willys Widgets

rebotnix Technologies

Tai Audio

CineTape

CineLab

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Wooden Camera

Technodolly

Ritter Battery

Aerial Filmworks

The Slider

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Rig Wheels Passport

Paralinx LLC

Glidecam

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Abel Cine

FJS International, LLC