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Is Eyemo Any Good?


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#1 Christian Blas

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Posted 21 June 2006 - 10:54 PM

Is Eyemo any good? I am thinking about using it in a feature film but I need to know if it is worthy to get. All I know it can used sync (with a Revolution motor) and it uses internal 100ft of film. So is this camera any good?
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 21 June 2006 - 11:03 PM

Sure, for what it is. Good for certain types of MOS shots. Can be hard to frame a shot precisely since it's not reflexed. You could get it reflexed and add a crystal-sync motor, but at that point you might as well get an Arri-2C instead...
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#3 Christian Blas

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Posted 21 June 2006 - 11:10 PM

Is the Filmo 16mm any good also? Is it better than Eyemo?
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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 22 June 2006 - 12:35 AM

Is the Filmo 16mm any good also? Is it better than Eyemo?


It's just the 16mm version of the Eyemo, but made a little less sturdy I believe, since the 16mm market was more for amateurs when it was released. But similar otherwise.
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#5 Robert Hughes

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Posted 22 June 2006 - 08:18 AM

As David says, the Filmo is the 16mm film camera; the Eyemo, I believe, was taken from the Filmo design for 35mm. But the Filmo, like the Eyemo, is a small, tough machine. The US Army used both in WW2 and the Filmo into the 1970's. They are both simple, low tech, and reliable. The Eyemo 71Q accepts 400' magazines and electric motor drive.

Edited by Robert Hughes, 22 June 2006 - 08:23 AM.

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#6 Christian Blas

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Posted 22 June 2006 - 08:36 PM

What is the Eyemo and Filmo's frames per second (fps) and I also want to know how durable are they. Can they really withstand anything?
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#7 Charles MacDonald

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Posted 22 June 2006 - 09:32 PM

What is the Eyemo and Filmo's frames per second (fps) and I also want to know how durable are they. Can they really withstand anything?

a standrd Filmo will go up to 60FPS (later models) Their is also supised to be a high speed model... (only high speed I forget what that cone could do.. I don't know about an eyemo.
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#8 David Sweetman

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Posted 22 June 2006 - 10:15 PM

I wouldn't want to use one as an A-cam, but they're good for inserts and other miscelaneous shots. I was on a shoot once where one was used to film an insert of a hamburger commercial which was superimposed on a television screen. In that case it was great, it's tiny, portable, easy to use, you can load it in daylight (assuming you've got daylight spools.) The only part that is a pain, obviously, is the parallax viewfinder. It looked pretty indestructible to me -- like someone said, they were used in WWII. And don't quote me on this...but I think they're pin registered.

oh and I thought this was pretty sweet:
Posted Image
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#9 Robert Hughes

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Posted 23 June 2006 - 08:02 PM

Nope - they are not pin registered. That would cost you quite a bit over what a used Eyemo or Filmo goes for.

The 16mm Filmos (models DA and later) run 8-64 fps. Eyemo 71K runs 12-24fps, the Eyemo 71Q runs 8-48fps. Don't run them empty at high speed, you might mess up the mechanism.

Durable? That's all relative, I guess. I wouldn't use them as crash cameras, but at least one of mine obviously was at some point. Remember that any Eyemo has at least 40 years of possibly rough service by now; if you intend to use it for serious filmmaking you'd be advised to send it to a professional for maintenance.

But a camera is a box to hold film; you need a good lens on the front for pictures that meet modern quality standards, and Eyemo lenses are ancient technology, equivalent to Mitchell lenses of the same era. Expect flare, vignetting, corner distortion, chromatic abberation, a whole gamut of quirks unknown to cinematographers accustomed to the perfect lens designs of today.
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#10 Brad Grimmett

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Posted 24 June 2006 - 04:17 AM

Durable? That's all relative, I guess. I wouldn't use them as crash cameras, but at least one of mine obviously was at some point.

Funny you mention using Eyemo's as crash cameras. We used 4 (maybe 5) of them as crash cameras on a movie I did last year. Two of them are in pieces and never to be repaired, one was fine, and one had minor damage. One of the crashed ones was on a car that we flipped end over end twice. Someone actually thought the mag would intact after the crash (it obviously wasn't). The other one went down in a helicopter. Oh, and we mounted one to a motorcycle that we crashed, but I think it may have been repairable. But other than that they were pretty damn tough.
Sorry I'm a bit off topic.
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#11 Tim Terner

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Posted 24 June 2006 - 04:35 AM

Quite an interesting Eyemo here on German Ebay http://cgi.ebay.de/3...1QQcmdZViewItem
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#12 Christian Blas

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Posted 27 June 2006 - 05:04 PM

Which Filmo 70 is a good choice to use to make a feature-film? What is the information on that type of Filmo 70?
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#13 Jan Weis

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Posted 27 June 2006 - 06:00 PM

I believe Kubrick used a Eyemo to shoot his second feature, Killer's Kiss. According to imdb it was used in the boxing sequences.
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#14 Hal Smith

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Posted 27 June 2006 - 07:37 PM

Which Filmo 70 is a good choice to use to make a feature-film? What is the information on that type of Filmo 70?

The 70HR takes 400' magazines - I believe there's another model that takes the magazines but I know for a fact the 70HR does, I own one. They also take an electric motor, mine has a non-sync 120VAC motor. I'm not certain whether or not there's either a sync motor or a pilot-tone adapter for a Filmo. If not, sync sound would be quite difficult - the AC motor is a universal type and won't run at a steady speed, and the spring motor would be worse.

There was a thread recently covering trying to make a sound movie with a non sync, noisy camera. The consensus of opinion was not to use a non-sync, non blimped camera, better to rent or buy a good, quiet sync camera because you'll spend a fortune in either time or money (or both :( ) trying to post a movie without sync sound.
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#15 Charles MacDonald

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Posted 27 June 2006 - 08:22 PM

They also take an electric motor, mine has a non-sync 120VAC motor. I'm not certain whether or not there's either a sync motor or a pilot-tone adapter for a Filmo.

There is really no way to disengage the spring motor on a FIlmo or Eyemo. The electric motor drives the camera effectivly between the srping and the mechisim, which means that the spped is sert by the govonor for the spring motor. The electic motor has a slip clutch to allow for this.
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#16 Robert Hughes

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Posted 28 June 2006 - 05:35 AM

Which Filmo 70 is a good choice to use to make a feature-film? What is the information on that type of Filmo 70?

Reminds me of a fairy tale movie - "Herbie, Fully Loaded". Which Volkswagen would be a good choice for winning the Indy 500?
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#17 Charles MacDonald

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Posted 28 June 2006 - 06:34 PM

Reminds me of a fairy tale movie - "Herbie, Fully Loaded". Which Volkswagen would be a good choice for winning the Indy 500?

Yes, Which FIlmo to shoot spat news, or which filmo to shoot a documnetary of wildlife I could see. You might even find it good for music videos, (as thouse- at least the ones I have seen never use actually sync sound)

I someone wanted me to work on a 16mm Feature, I think I would be looking at a CP16 as a munimum, and probaly SHOULD look at an ARRI or one of its competirors.

Does not stop me from Loving my Filmo, best camera I can afford.
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