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Storing Recanned Raw Stock


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#1 Raffinator

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Posted 22 June 2006 - 03:59 PM

I recently received a shipment of recanned 7218 for a short I'm shooting -- unfortunately, due to an injury to one of the actors, production has been put on hold for two months, possibly more.

My question is, should I consider storing this "long term" (in the fridge) since production could be delayed for more than two or three months, and, if so, is keeping recanned raw stock in a fridge a safe practice (since its no longer factory sealed). I'm guessing it should be fine, but I just wanted to make sure. Thank you.
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#2 Sasuke

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Posted 23 June 2006 - 04:34 PM

I recently received a shipment of recanned 7218 for a short I'm shooting -- unfortunately, due to an injury to one of the actors, production has been put on hold for two months, possibly more.

My question is, should I consider storing this "long term" (in the fridge) since production could be delayed for more than two or three months, and, if so, is keeping recanned raw stock in a fridge a safe practice (since its no longer factory sealed). I'm guessing it should be fine, but I just wanted to make sure. Thank you.



I shot a commercial 2 MONTHS ago on 5218, put it on the shelf (on my bedroom floor actually). Last
week I had it developed and telecined on a RANK TURBO. NO problems. NONE. IT LOOKED GREAT.
Just make sure it is not exposed to extreme heat, you should be fine.
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#3 Nathan D. Lee

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Posted 23 June 2006 - 06:46 PM

I have a dedicated film fridge. Mostly so its not around food that brings in moister and other problems. Its small and i have it kept at about -5(f) to be as close as i can to Kodaks pecs.
Kodak has the storage specs on their website.

"Cold temperatures are best for slowing the inevitable changes in sensitivity. If raw stock must be kept for periods of up to 3 months, temperatures of 13°C (55°F) or less are appropriate. If raw stock must be kept longer than 3 months, freezing at -18° to -23°C (0 to -10°F) is recommended. After any cold storage, be sure to allow the films to equilibrate slowly to the ambient temperature where it will be used. This is necessary to prevent moisture condensation and spotting. Conditioning time will vary with the thickness of the packages and the temperature and dew point of the outside air. A 100-foot roll of 16 mm can take as little as 1/2 hour to condition whereas a 1000-foot roll of 35 mm may take up to 3 hours. Do not open the packages if they feel colder than the ambient temperature. Always use films soon after purchasing."

"Raw stock must be kept away from excessive heat and water which would make it tacky. The temperature in a closed automobile in the sun can easily register over 55°C (130°F). This somewhat fragile material film is especially sensitive until it's exposed and properly processed. An area of particular concern for protecting raw stock is radiation, whether it be an obvious source or ambient. Always process film soon after being exposed to lessen the chance of contamination."

Both of these are from: http://www.kodak.com.../....12.8&lc=en


Keep it cold, keep it dry, you?ll be fine for a while. Film is pretty tough stuff.

Nathan
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#4 Raffinator

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Posted 23 June 2006 - 07:50 PM

Thanks gents, and those quotes were very helpful.

I'll keep it in the cellar or somewhere cool and dry until we shoot -- if production continues getting pushed back, I'll fridge it.
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#5 Chris Keth

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Posted 24 June 2006 - 01:29 AM

Thanks gents, and those quotes were very helpful.

I'll keep it in the cellar or somewhere cool and dry until we shoot -- if production continues getting pushed back, I'll fridge it.



I'd make a place in your freezer, personally. The colder the better.
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#6 Charles MacDonald

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Posted 24 June 2006 - 10:19 PM

I'd make a place in your freezer, personally. The colder the better.

That is what I always thought, but John from Kodak pointed out on a previous thread that a recan may not be at the "right" relative humidity and so you could have frost form if you freze it.

I have never heard of this happening, but I respect that John DOES get all the compalints that came in to Kodak Park about film that does not work right, and so he probaly HAD.

I suspose you could Pakc some silica Gell in, let it work for a week then Freeze it, but that may Over dry the film. or cause distrotion as the edges dry more than the center, (bigger concern with 35mm stock)

I would think that as long as you are sure that the can is well sealed, that keeping it just above frezing, (say 4C) should maximise the life without the risk of Ice crystals forming. Naturalty the usual drill of leeting ot warm up before opening, and perhaps letting it warm up slowly by wrapping it in a blanket and leving it overnight before use, (on the off cance that the can is really humid inside, and their is enough mosture to condense in the sealed can.
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#7 Chris Keth

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Posted 25 June 2006 - 12:49 AM

That is what I always thought, but John from Kodak pointed out on a previous thread that a recan may not be at the "right" relative humidity and so you could have frost form if you freze it.

I have never heard of this happening, but I respect that John DOES get all the compalints that came in to Kodak Park about film that does not work right, and so he probaly HAD.

I suspose you could Pakc some silica Gell in, let it work for a week then Freeze it, but that may Over dry the film. or cause distrotion as the edges dry more than the center, (bigger concern with 35mm stock)

I would think that as long as you are sure that the can is well sealed, that keeping it just above frezing, (say 4C) should maximise the life without the risk of Ice crystals forming. Naturalty the usual drill of leeting ot warm up before opening, and perhaps letting it warm up slowly by wrapping it in a blanket and leving it overnight before use, (on the off cance that the can is really humid inside, and their is enough mosture to condense in the sealed can.



I've always just waited until an average humidity day and sealed the stock in gallon-size ziplock bags then froze it. I've never had problems. It's probably not aboslutely optimal, but it's never hurt my film for periods of under a year.
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#8 Freya Black

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Posted 28 June 2006 - 03:30 AM

I've always just waited until an average humidity day and sealed the stock in gallon-size ziplock bags then froze it. I've never had problems. It's probably not aboslutely optimal, but it's never hurt my film for periods of under a year.


If you do refrigerate or freeze film, always, always put it in some kind of sealable freezer bag. Not only is it an extra block against general moisture but there have been some horror stories on here about power cuts or freezers failing and if you have your film in airtight bags it may save you from a terrible and shocking time.

love

Freya
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#9 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 28 June 2006 - 10:41 AM

For storing unexposed raw stock for a few months, I would recommend cold storage, but not freezing (ice crystal concern if film has been exposed to high humidity). Kodak stores unprocessed camera films at near 55F.

Detailed information about film storage:

http://www.kodak.com...b/tib5202.shtml

http://www.kodak.com...rage_cond.jhtml
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#10 Henri Titchen

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Posted 29 June 2006 - 05:03 AM

For storing unexposed raw stock for a few months, I would recommend cold storage, but not freezing (ice crystal concern if film has been exposed to high humidity). Kodak stores unprocessed camera films at near 55F.

Detailed information about film storage:

http://www.kodak.com...b/tib5202.shtml

http://www.kodak.com...rage_cond.jhtml


Excellent information. I see in the Kodak technical info that it states:

"If raw stock must be kept longer than 3 months, freezing at -18° to -23°C (0 to -10°F) is recommended."

I wondered what the ice crystal concern is with freezing...emulsion damage? Can it be reduced by using silica gel sachets in the film can?

Thanks From,
Henry.
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#11 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 29 June 2006 - 06:05 AM

Excellent information. I see in the Kodak technical info that it states:

"If raw stock must be kept longer than 3 months, freezing at -18° to -23°C (0 to -10°F) is recommended."

I wondered what the ice crystal concern is with freezing...emulsion damage? Can it be reduced by using silica gel sachets in the film can?

Thanks From,
Henry.


If the factory-sealed can has been opened, the film can absorb extra moisture in a humid environment. If sealed and frozen, the excess moisture may condense and form ice crystals. Yes, a dessicant like silica gel might be used, but I don't know if there could be a "photoactive" chemical in the dessicant that could fog or desensitize the film, especially if particles of it came into contact with the film.
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