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#1 David Calson

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Posted 24 June 2006 - 09:26 AM

Is there a fast method to making a difficult stinger coil back like it should? I have one that's very long and severely out of whack.
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#2 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 24 June 2006 - 09:46 AM

Hi,

As with any cable, if it's been improperly coiled, especially over someone's arm with no attention paid to the way it wants to go, then it's damaged permanently. It probably won't stop working, at least in the short term, but there's no practical way to fix it.

Phil
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#3 Chris Keth

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Posted 24 June 2006 - 10:36 AM

It won't go back perfectly, but if you coil it out straightand have a couple people pull on it (think lightish tug of war, you don't want to break anything) it will often help the situation some.
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#4 Hal Smith

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Posted 24 June 2006 - 01:51 PM

I've tied a piece of rope with a couple of clove hitches in sequence to one end of a badly abused cable, tied the rope to something stout (like a trailer hitch on my van), and yanked it out straight by myself. As Chris notes, it won't bring the cable back like new but it helps. Make certain the cord hasn't got any twists in it before torturing it - that'll lessen the change of damaging the internal wires.
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#5 David Calson

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Posted 24 June 2006 - 08:55 PM

thanks for your help guys!
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#6 Matthew Parnell

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Posted 25 June 2006 - 01:48 AM

Ive found leaving a cable out for a couple in the sun, uncoiled and straight(with a bit of light tension through it) on bitumen on a hot day usually works wonders for mic cables, it worked well for stingers as well, but they had to be left out longer(mic cables have softer insulation).

I made sure that the guys that did it never did it again however.

Edited by Matthew Parnell, 25 June 2006 - 01:49 AM.

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#7 Robert Goodrich

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Posted 25 June 2006 - 09:35 PM

I was a road manager for a travelling theatre show, and we had 100' lengths of speaker cable. Always used to get tangled and twisted.

At the end of every week, when we returned home, we would visit a 5-story parking garage. We would tie off the cables to the back of the van and hang them over the edge and eat our fast food dinner and BS about what we did that week. By the end of dinner, the twists would have worked themselves out, and we could retrieve the cables and get a nice coil (although, 100' speaker cables are real deltoid busters).

My last year on tour we bought these cable spools that had a hand crank (you see them sometimes used with garden hoses). You just yanked out enough cable to reach the speakers, and then hand cranked them back in at the end of the show. It was like we had discovered fire. Marvelous devices.
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