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#1 MikeFalg

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Posted 26 June 2006 - 04:27 PM

Looking on advice on shooting a time lapse sequence. I will be shooting our building frontage which has a large world globe structure in the front of the entrance with the building entrance in the far background. The sun will rise from my back side and set with the camera lens facing the sun. I'm thinking I will have some serious exposure issues, color balancing, as well as lighting changes in which the building and globe has it's own exterior lighting system. I plan on beginning shooting as early as sunrise and time lapsing into the night. Total length of take is approximately 12 seconds. I was hoping to achieve the effect of "tracing" from the lights on the cars when it turns into night...The globe also has pin lights which identify the various locations of the company. I can send freeze of the building in an attachment if needed...

Any advice would be appreciated! Thanks
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#2 Michael Nash

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Posted 27 June 2006 - 10:04 PM

I don't have much time lapse experience, but I can share what I know...

The streaking lights you're looking for come from the exposure time (shutterspeed), not the frame rate. A quick glance at the manual shows that in 24P mode the camera captures 5 frames per interval, which would indicate the shutterspeed would be no slower than 1/24 sec., which is probably not slow enough. In 60i mode I think you can do single frame intervals, but I'm not sure of the shutterspeeds or if you could combine interval recording with the "cumulative gain mode" or whatever it's called.

Regarding exposure, the general rule of thumb is not use the autoiris as it can fluctuate with each passing cloud or foreground object, resulting in distracting exposure jumps. It's generally better to manually perform a S-L-O-W iris pull when shifting into night (like, over the course of an hour).

But I'll gladly defer to others who have time lapse experience...
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#3 Hans Kellner

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Posted 28 June 2006 - 01:41 AM

Looking on advice on shooting a time lapse sequence.

I've done time lapses with my DVX and with a digital camera.

Take a quick look at this thread for a post about using my DVX and an example:

http://www.cinematog...n...19&hl=lapse

But I would recommend looking into using a digital camera for doing your time lapse. You are able to capture higher resolution images and also have better control over the exposure. Once you capture the images it's very easy to run them through Photoshop to crop and adjust to the desired look and feel. Then you import the images into your editor (FCP, PPro, etc) as a filmroll.

I plan on beginning shooting as early as sunrise and time lapsing into the night. Total length of take is approximately 12 seconds.

This entry might be helpful. It's a time lapse formula I posted:

http://www.hanskelln...se_formula.html
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#4 MikeFalg

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Posted 29 June 2006 - 10:49 AM

I don't have much time lapse experience, but I can share what I know...

The streaking lights you're looking for come from the exposure time (shutterspeed), not the frame rate. A quick glance at the manual shows that in 24P mode the camera captures 5 frames per interval, which would indicate the shutterspeed would be no slower than 1/24 sec., which is probably not slow enough. In 60i mode I think you can do single frame intervals, but I'm not sure of the shutterspeeds or if you could combine interval recording with the "cumulative gain mode" or whatever it's called.

Regarding exposure, the general rule of thumb is not use the autoiris as it can fluctuate with each passing cloud or foreground object, resulting in distracting exposure jumps. It's generally better to manually perform a S-L-O-W iris pull when shifting into night (like, over the course of an hour).

But I'll gladly defer to others who have time lapse experience...


Thank you for the information...I plan on doing a spec shoot soon
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Wooden Camera

Paralinx LLC

Rig Wheels Passport

Technodolly

CineTape

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

CineLab

Tai Audio

Visual Products

Glidecam

Opal

FJS International, LLC

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Metropolis Post

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

The Slider

rebotnix Technologies

Abel Cine

Ritter Battery