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5205 film stock question


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#1 bragis chut

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Posted 27 June 2006 - 10:39 AM

Hi:

My DP has just given me her stock preferences for an upcoming shoot as 5205 for daylight stuff and 5218 for nighttime. We can only afford to go with short ends however and most of the retailers I've contacted aren't able to give me that good a deal on the 5205 (probably because it's in high demand).

So my question is this: is there a similar stock that I could consider? I had a pretty good price on some 5246 film stock. What are the differences? Any advice is much appreciated.
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 27 June 2006 - 10:47 AM

The main advantage to 5205 is that it has the Vision-2 look in terms of grain and contrast. So if you can't afford it, and that matching is important to you, then the alternative would be to use 5218 for everything... or use 5217 (200T) for the day scenes. It's just that 5217 with an 85B filter is 125 ASA, so is a stop slower than 5205 (250D). Maybe that's fine.

5246 would work too, it's just that it is a little higher in contrast than 5218 and not much finer-grained. On the other hand, you may prefer it if the weather gets really flat and overcast...

The other option is Fuji Eterna 250D '63 and 500T '73, which match each other well.
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#3 bragis chut

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Posted 27 June 2006 - 08:26 PM

The main advantage to 5205 is that it has the Vision-2 look in terms of grain and contrast. So if you can't afford it, and that matching is important to you, then the alternative would be to use 5218 for everything... or use 5217 (200T) for the day scenes. It's just that 5217 with an 85B filter is 125 ASA, so is a stop slower than 5205 (250D). Maybe that's fine.

5246 would work too, it's just that it is a little higher in contrast than 5218 and not much finer-grained. On the other hand, you may prefer it if the weather gets really flat and overcast...

The other option is Fuji Eterna 250D '63 and 500T '73, which match each other well.


Thanks for the advice, David, although we had some great news today and it looks like we found a great deal on our first choice stock. Once in a while things work out... I did have one other question though. Do you happen to know if there's a way to determine whether a stock is three perf or four without opening up the cannister and checking by hand? I.e., is there some marking on the label that would tell us this? We have about three thousand feet of film from POSEIDON and we're not sure whether it is three perf or four.

Thanks.
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#4 Charles MacDonald

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Posted 27 June 2006 - 08:42 PM

Do you happen to know if there's a way to determine whether a stock is three perf or four without opening up the cannister and checking by hand? I.e., is there some marking on the label that would tell us this?


I think if you check you will find that 3 Perf or Four perf is decided by what camera you put it though. Normal 35mm negative stock is BH1866 which can be used for either format Heck I would guess you could even use it for Vista-Vison if you could still find a camera.
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#5 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 28 June 2006 - 01:15 AM

It's your 35mm camera that is either 3 or 4-perf, Full Aperture or Academy (sound) Aperture -- the 35mm negative stock is the same for all of those formats. It's not like 16mm where you can either get single-perf (perfs only along one edge) or double-perf (perfs on both sides) stock. In 35mm, the perfs run down both sides and how many you pulldown per frame just depends on your camera.
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#6 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 28 June 2006 - 10:35 AM

More about film perforations:

http://www.kodak.com.../h1/sizes.shtml

Again, whether 35mm has 2-perf, 3-perf, 4-perf, or 8-perf frames is determined by the camera you use.

For 65mm film, 5-perf, 8-perf, 10-perf, and 15-perf cameras are available.

The "pitch" (distance between perforations) of 35mm and 65mm camera films is usually 0.1866 inches.
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