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Kodachrome blue scratches


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#1 Freya Black

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Posted 27 June 2006 - 07:17 PM

I want to create some blue scatches on some processed kodachrome film. Is this possibly? I thought it might be but then someone was suggesting the film can only be scratched to blue marks before processing.

If anyone has any tips or tricks for creating the electric blue scratches after processing, please let me know.

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#2 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 28 June 2006 - 10:29 AM

I want to create some blue scatches on some processed kodachrome film. Is this possibly? I thought it might be but then someone was suggesting the film can only be scratched to blue marks before processing.

If anyone has any tips or tricks for creating the electric blue scratches after processing, please let me know.

love

Freya


Pressure/scratching of the emulsion side of UNPROCESSED film can result in blue marks because the blue sensitive layer is the topmost imaging layer. Scratching processed camera original film will remove the yellow layer first, which on a reversal film will be blue, but on a negative film will be yellow in the final print. But the disruption of the emulsion around the scratch will give you additional artifacts and debris.

Can you simulate this, rather than ruin your original film by scratching it?
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#3 Freya Black

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Posted 29 June 2006 - 08:14 AM

Pressure/scratching of the emulsion side of UNPROCESSED film can result in blue marks because the blue sensitive layer is the topmost imaging layer. Scratching processed camera original film will remove the yellow layer first, which on a reversal film will be blue, but on a negative film will be yellow in the final print. But the disruption of the emulsion around the scratch will give you additional artifacts and debris.

Can you simulate this, rather than ruin your original film by scratching it?


I cant simulate this as it is for direct projection. :(

However it is not bad to damage the original reversal in this case as it is just some black processed film.

I do not mind additional artifacts but obviously debris could build up in the projector I suppose.

It sounds like I need to create very light scratches?

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Freya
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#4 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 29 June 2006 - 01:43 PM

I cant simulate this as it is for direct projection. :(

However it is not bad to damage the original reversal in this case as it is just some black processed film.

I do not mind additional artifacts but obviously debris could build up in the projector I suppose.

It sounds like I need to create very light scratches?

love

Freya


Just experiment with some scrap film. For KODACHROME film, the order of the imaging layers is blue (yellow dye) on top, green (magenta dye) in the middle, and red (cyan dye) on the bottom. So a light scratch will be blue, a heavier scratch will be cyan, and a deep scratch will be clear, plus any debris from the damaged emulsion.

Clean the film after you scratch it, to minimize buildup of debris in the projector or on the image.
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#5 Freya Black

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Posted 30 June 2006 - 05:40 PM

Just experiment with some scrap film. For KODACHROME film, the order of the imaging layers is blue (yellow dye) on top, green (magenta dye) in the middle, and red (cyan dye) on the bottom. So a light scratch will be blue, a heavier scratch will be cyan, and a deep scratch will be clear, plus any debris from the damaged emulsion.

Clean the film after you scratch it, to minimize buildup of debris in the projector or on the image.


Thanks ever so much John, it's good to know the dye order and I'll follow your tips as best I can! :)

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Freya
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