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Los Angeles Film School


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#1 Maximilian Schmige

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Posted 28 June 2006 - 03:37 AM

I attended the open house to find out more about the cinematography program they have. They have John Horra, ASC and Blaine Brown (ex-UCLA faculty) teaching it. All students work on digital the first half, and then HD, 16mm and 35mm. The thesis can be on any media.

Blaine seamed like a great teacher, but I am not sure a full year is enough to learn anything about cinematography.

Any recent alumnus around here? I would appreciate if someone could explain fairly excactly what you get to learn. I don't want to spend all this money and a year if at the end I haven't learnt anything. I hope the program teaches more then just the basics like 3 point lighting etc.

How good are they with equipment? Do you still have to rent more stuff?

Thanx

Edited by fl1x, 28 June 2006 - 03:39 AM.

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#2 Maximilian Schmige

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Posted 08 July 2006 - 12:09 AM

hmmm...anyone have any thoughts about the school?! Anyone familiar with the instructors?

Does anyone know how specialized the second semester is?

Thanx

Edited by fl1x, 08 July 2006 - 12:10 AM.

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#3 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 08 July 2006 - 12:42 AM

The school is new, it's well-equipped, and it has a good faculty -- otherwise, I don't know anything about it.
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#4 Daniel Madsen

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Posted 08 July 2006 - 01:31 PM

I hear good and bad things about the school. They have some solid teachers for one. Blain Brown who teaches there has written a couple great books on cinematography. LAFS Students have told me the administration is lacking, but it seems like this is the case at most schools (mine too).

One thing I can tell you is LAFS students know how to run a set- fast, efficient, organized.
They would run circles around most students at Columbia College Hollywood, a film school I attend in the Valley.
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#5 Hal Smith

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Posted 08 July 2006 - 02:51 PM

One thing I can tell you is LAFS students know how to run a set- fast, efficient, organized.
They would run circles around most students at Columbia College Hollywood, a film school I attend in the Valley.

My ex-wife (actually one of my ex-wives) went to Columbia, I wasn't particularly impressed with their technical education. She was an University of Chicago trained Anthropologist and a great natural photographer. She could have had a pretty good career in ethnographic film but she was always fighting with equipment, etc. and just gave up. A better school would have understood her individual strengths and weaknesses and built a curriculum for her.
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#6 Maximilian Schmige

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Posted 09 July 2006 - 11:09 PM

Thanx for the replies. I also looked into NYFA, but the program is too basic and the faculty is recent film school graduates.

LAFS breaks down their two semester program into two phases.

The first semester is a boot camp, where u learn everything about filmmaking.

For the second semester u ve to decide a major and a minor. I was wondering how much u get to learn in that second semester since that should be the time when u learn ur skills in ur field. Then also the second semester consists of production time. Sounds like very little time to learn ur craft.

Would be great to see a reel from a recent almuni :D
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#7 Maximilian Schmige

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Posted 09 July 2006 - 11:23 PM

I studied *grr* about film. I had a few chances to shoot on 16mm b/w and color a couple of times. I know how to do basic lighting set ups etc. Most of the time I try to self-educate about cinematography, but need a place to get some more hands-on-instruction.

Ok what I try to figure out is whether LAFS is something for not complete newbies. I already dislike the idea of the first semester. I know the "basic" about editing etc. Doesn't sound like the best way to spend half a year...

I don't want to spend another 4 yrs at graduate film school. I try to find an alternative, because I believe my chances to get into AFI are very slim. I will try, but I don't think I am advanced enough. Kinda in-between.

Thanx again in advance for ur help
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#8 Patrick McGowan

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Posted 28 July 2006 - 09:59 PM

I had a friend who was an alumni from LAFS. He learned a great deal of information, and I was really impressed that he worked with 35mm and learned about film developing. I hear it is much like a technical boot camp, and is very fast paced. My friend isn't working in the industry now, I am not really sure what he is doing. Anyway, good luck.
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#9 Maximilian Schmige

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Posted 30 July 2006 - 08:46 PM

thanx guys for the feedback. I am now taking a 6-week filmmaking course at the NYFA. Is pritty cool, but as I expected very basic in nature. It truelly is what u make out of it.

Check out the showcase section in this board for my music video (apocalyptica) I made there.

Edited by fl1x, 30 July 2006 - 08:47 PM.

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#10 Matt Workman

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Posted 31 July 2006 - 09:23 PM

I know a director from the LAFS. She shot a few DV shorts, s16, and a 35mm short. You also get to crew on everyone elses shoots. She said it was a great program because it was one year. A four year program plus a 35/16 thesis film can put in debt quite a large amount.

Regardless of any program, if you have talent, and want to work hard you'll get a lot out of it. After one day of on set work you can learn more than three point lighting, come on.
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#11 David Sweetman

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Posted 13 August 2006 - 04:46 PM

I'd love to go there just because Amoeba Music is RIGHT NEXT DOOR! My gosh, that's the best music store ever. I'd be there all the time. Heck I'd make a movie about the place.
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