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How to shoot a Framing chart properly


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#1 Wai Choy

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Posted 28 June 2006 - 09:43 PM

Hey,

I'm planning to telecine my upcoming short film to 720p HD. I'll be shooting it on standard 16mm color negative and losing the top and bottom of the 4:3 16mm frame during the telecine process to get the 16 x 9 frame.

I've never had to do this before, as I've always telecined to standard definition and matted the frame in post. This will be my first experience with going to HD.

Can someone please tell me where to get, and how to properly shoot, a 16 x 9 framing chart so that the telecine people know the exact part of my film I want to have telecined?

Thanks a lot.

-Wai
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#2 Michael Nash

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Posted 29 June 2006 - 12:20 AM

The main idea is to generate a 4:3 rectangle to represent your 16mm frame, and then draw a 16:9 rectangle inside that, filling the full width of the 4:3 area and centering the 16:9 box exactly in the middle, top to bottom. You can draw this out on a piece of paper with a pen and a ruler, or you can generate one with any simple computer graphics or document app.

I created some you can find here, although not the 16:9 w/in 4:3 you need. But you'll get the idea of what it looks like:
http://www.cinematog...showtopic=14992

Tape your chart to a wall and carefully line up your camera, on a tripod, so that the 4:3 boundary precisely lines up with the edge of your 16mm frame. Make sure the image is level, not keystoned, and not distorted by a wide lens (a "medium" focal length is best). Focus and expose properly, and roll on it for about 10 seconds.

As for generating framing lines for your camera's viewfinder, that depends on the model of the camera.
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#3 Chris Keth

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Posted 29 June 2006 - 12:44 AM

The bext way I've found to do it is to just put the correct ground glass for the format in the camera. Set the camera shooting toward a white wall with a prime lens wide open and focused for that distance. Then I set up an inkie shooting right down the barrel of the viewfinder, turning the camera into a projector. This will project the groundglass right onto the wall (you may have to dim the ceiling lights to see it really clearly, but it's usually pretty bright.) so you can trace the lines with marker or tape. Easily done with one person, no screwing around with tape triangles and the video tap, quick as hell. B)

Edit: Another benefit of my method is that you don't actually have to be exactly parallel to the wall, nor do you have to be on any specific lens, other than a fast enough one that the projection isn't too dim.

Edited by Christopher D. Keth, 29 June 2006 - 12:45 AM.

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Ritter Battery

The Slider

Technodolly

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Broadcast Solutions Inc

Opal

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