Jump to content


Photo

Aspect Ratios on HD Set and Monitors


  • Please log in to reply
3 replies to this topic

#1 Joe Taylor

Joe Taylor
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 397 posts
  • Other

Posted 02 July 2006 - 12:35 PM

How come some DVD Cases will sometimes state the film's anamorphic aspect ratio of being, say, 1.78, or, 1.66, 1.85, but they always fill the screen, which is 16x9. (Except 2.35 films, which are always close to their stated ratio.

If a case claims 1.85, then it theoretically will not fill the screen since it will be wider then the 16x9.

Am I missing something here?
  • 0

#2 Stephen Williams

Stephen Williams
  • Sustaining Members
  • 4708 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Europe

Posted 02 July 2006 - 12:49 PM

How come some DVD Cases will sometimes state the film's anamorphic aspect ratio of being, say, 1.78, or, 1.66, 1.85, but they always fill the screen, which is 16x9. (Except 2.35 films, which are always close to their stated ratio.

If a case claims 1.85, then it theoretically will not fill the screen since it will be wider then the 16x9.

Am I missing something here?


Hi,

16x9 is actually very close to 1.85.
The telecine operator will probably slightly zoom to fill the screen or have a very small letterbox that you may not see.
Many TV's will fit the image to the screen size, depending on the software set up.

Stephen
  • 0

#3 David Mullen ASC

David Mullen ASC
  • Sustaining Members
  • 19765 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 02 July 2006 - 06:57 PM

Yes, 16x9 is 1.78 -- which is so close to 1.85 that the slight letterboxing for 1.85 may be outside your 16x9 TV set's frame, in the overscan area. It's only a few scan lines of black at the top and bottom.
  • 0

#4 Chance Shirley

Chance Shirley
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 256 posts
  • Director

Posted 02 July 2006 - 07:08 PM

1.85:1 is transferred for 16x9 with very slight letterboxing. 1.66:1 is transferred for 16x9 with very slight "windowboxing" (thin borders along the side). I've found that the letter/windowboxing is often lost in the overscan area of televisions. I can't really explain overscan, buy you can read about it here:

http://scanline.ca/overscan/

And here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Overscan

EDIT: Looks like David beat me to the punch.

Edited by Chance Shirley, 02 July 2006 - 07:09 PM.

  • 0


Abel Cine

Ritter Battery

Technodolly

Aerial Filmworks

Tai Audio

Rig Wheels Passport

rebotnix Technologies

FJS International, LLC

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Paralinx LLC

Metropolis Post

Visual Products

Opal

Willys Widgets

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

CineTape

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

The Slider

Glidecam

CineLab

Wooden Camera

The Slider

Visual Products

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

rebotnix Technologies

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Metropolis Post

Abel Cine

Tai Audio

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

FJS International, LLC

Aerial Filmworks

CineLab

Wooden Camera

Opal

Glidecam

Paralinx LLC

CineTape

Willys Widgets

Technodolly

Rig Wheels Passport

Ritter Battery