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Lexan - how can you tell the difference from Plexiglass


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#1 Chien Huey

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Posted 05 July 2006 - 02:32 PM

Sorry to dredge the gun safety topic up again but I'm working on a film that will have firearms on set - so this is important to me. How can you tell the difference between Lexan and Plexiglas? Obviously if they get new sheets that have the paper back that says Lexan but let's say they recycle pieces. I known my Nalgene bottle is made of Lexan but I've seen bottles not made of Lexan look similar.

Do I have to take their word for it? And how thick should the pieces be? 1/2", 3/4"
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#2 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 05 July 2006 - 02:54 PM

Sorry to dredge the gun safety topic up again but I'm working on a film that will have firearms on set - so this is important to me. How can you tell the difference between Lexan and Plexiglas? Obviously if they get new sheets that have the paper back that says Lexan but let's say they recycle pieces. I known my Nalgene bottle is made of Lexan but I've seen bottles not made of Lexan look similar.

Do I have to take their word for it? And how thick should the pieces be? 1/2", 3/4"


I assume you would need to compare shatter resistance, impact resistance, etc.:

Shatter Resistance (ASTM D-3841/SPI Method B)
Large Missile Test - Impact Resistance per SFBC PA 201-94
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#3 Bob Hayes

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Posted 05 July 2006 - 03:03 PM

Despite the fact that the use of Plexiglas is guaranteed by the Constitution I think it should be banned from civilian use.

But if you really must know the way to test I hear that all you have to do is hit it with a hammer. I would think over an uneven surface. I think I would cut a small piece from my stock to test it so you don?t ruin a whole sheet. Lexan although very hard isn?t brittle. It gives a little and won?t shatter.
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#4 Chien Huey

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Posted 05 July 2006 - 03:06 PM

Despite the fact that the use of Plexiglas is guaranteed by the Constitution I think it should be banned from civilian use.

But if you really must know the way to test I hear that all you have to do is hit it with a hammer. I would think over an uneven surface. I think I would cut a small piece from my stock to test it so you don?t ruin a whole sheet. Lexan although very hard isn?t brittle. It gives a little and won?t shatter.


Cool, thanks Bob. I read about the AC who got hit with shotgun wadding and thought - that could be me. I'll remember to bring my hammer.
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#5 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 06 July 2006 - 10:03 AM

Cool, thanks Bob. I read about the AC who got hit with shotgun wadding and thought - that could be me. I'll remember to bring my hammer.


Ironic that you chose "Fast Chieney" as your pen name for a posting about shotguns. Any relation to Dick Cheney? :rolleyes:
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#6 Hal Smith

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Posted 06 July 2006 - 11:19 AM

Lexan is GE's brand name for polycarbonate Bisphenol A plastic. There are other manufacturers of the same type plastic.

From Wikipedia:

LEXAN® is the registered trademark for polycarbonate plastic manufactured (from Bisphenol A) by General Electric. MERLON® is the registered trademark used by the Mobay Chemical Company. MAKROLON® is the registered trademark for polycarbonate from Bayer, which is also referred to as "macrolon". PANLITE® is the registered trademark for polycarbonate plastic manufactured from Teijin Chemical Limited, which is also the major producer for optical grade polycarbonate.
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