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k, good first-time pro camera?


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#1 Kyle Polensky

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Posted 06 July 2006 - 02:39 AM

k, i'm an amateur (currently, i am working toward a film career) whose looking at getting a pro-level camera. i've done a couple paid projects, but nothing above unimportant clubs or HS sports vid level, and all of it on tiny, cheap, plastic consumer cameras with no options. i have an entire adobe suite of programs, so editing-wise im set, but what i dont have is a good quality camera

a guy in the business i know recommended the DVX to me, and i like it a lot, but the only question i have is, is it a good camera for a first-timer to get, or should i go with something simpler? i can get it used and in great condition from a reputable guy in my area for $2,000 . . . which is very cheap, but would buying it leave me stranded with an incomprehensible object? i've never used a camera with this many options before . . . im a quick learner, but some thing can take years to learn, and i dont want this camera to sit on a shelf more than a couple weeks!

thanks for the help
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 06 July 2006 - 11:04 AM

The DVX100 is a prosumer camera -- meaning a high-end consumer camera that can be used for professional work if needed. The only thing simpler to use would be something that did less, a lower-end consumer camera.

In other words, if you can't figure out how to use a $3000 prosumer camera, you're not really destined to shoot professional work, not to be mean about it. There is a level of shooting knowledge you're going to have to obtain. So don't be so scared and start figuring it out. You figured out how to set-up and use your Adobe suite afterall.

When you said "pro-level" camera, I thought you were thinking of getting a professional video camera.

At first these prosumer cameras, just like digital still cameras these days, have a lot of options but it doesn't take long to learn them, or ignore half of them. My cell phone came with a thicker instruction manual than a DVX100 has!

The main thing you have to learn is how to deal with 24P and pulldown issues in editorial. That's where people get confused.
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#3 Zamir Merali

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Posted 06 July 2006 - 11:20 AM

I think that you will have no problem learning to use a dvx. I myself only had used cheap consumer videocameras for about a year before finally buying an xl-2. Xl-2's are very similar to dvx's but some consider it to have a steeper learning curve. I managed to learn all the features in that camera in just a few days and by filling up a few tapes. All you really need to learn is how to change frame rates, how to change aspect ratios, how to do image control (colours, gama curve etc.) and how to set iris, focus, zoom. Knowing these things will be enough for you to use the camera to do pretty much anything.
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