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How does transfering from video to film work?


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#1 Alexis Mayer

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Posted 10 July 2006 - 07:31 PM

I'd really like to know how transfering from video to film works. What exactly is the step by step process. Is it expensive? What exactly is the Digital Intermediate and how is it made? Is the process the same for SD and HD? What kind of machine is used to do this? Lets say you shoot on film, but you want to do an effects shot that can only be done in post. Is it expensive to have just a few shots transferred from video to film?
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 10 July 2006 - 08:46 PM

That's a lot of questions.

Digital files, including video, are transferred to film using a film recorder. The two common types of film recorders are CRT recorders (basically a camera pointed at a high-rez monochrome CRT monitor and doing the color in three exposure passes with filters) and laser recorders (RGB lasers burning the image to film pixel by pixel.)

http://en.wikipedia....i/Film_recorder

There are also older, cruder "kinescopes", basically a camera pointed at a TV set.

An transfer on an Arrilaser to 35mm can cost around $450 for a minute of footage, hence $45,000 for a 100 minute feature. Price vary. A CRT transfer may be more like $300 for a minute or less.

"Digital intermediate" just means that the movie exists as a digital format at some point before being converted / transferred to film for printing. It generally is used to describe film origination that goes through a digital step before going back to film, and we tend to save the term though for when HD or 2K (or higher) RGB data is used for the intermediate stage, not something like DV, for example. Film-->digital-->film.

A 35mm movie that isn't going through a digital intermediate (D.I.) still may have digital efx shots where the shot's original photography was scanned into a digital form, the effect created, and then the final shot is recorded back to a new 35mm negative for cutting into the rest of the footage.

The idea with digital intermediate is that the digital step should be done at sufficient resolution and quality that it does not visibly suffer in comparison to material that didn't go through the process. It is designed partially as a replacement of the old method of making intermediates using duplicating stocks (IP's and IN's).
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#3 steve hyde

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Posted 13 July 2006 - 09:07 PM

....This link may help too:

http://www.alphacine...ilm/tapefaq.php
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Ritter Battery

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Visual Products

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Willys Widgets

Wooden Camera

Abel Cine

Aerial Filmworks