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#1 mekhael trepanier

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Posted 10 July 2006 - 08:55 PM

hello gang this is a very basic and general comment but looking for some help

over the past 2 years ive been writting the skript for my film its finally done ive sourced out the actors i need to make it happen as well as all the friends that ill need as freindly helpers to make it a reality...

the key word here is LOW BUDJET project...
having said that ive done some talking with people i know and they have already expressed interest in my project... 2 local indie theaters have already given me the green light to show it for a 2 week period once its complete...

now im shure someones gonan tell me dont put the cart before the horse but its been done already...

without disclosing my whole idea and theme for a film

my gut tells me ive got something good here and those who i have shared it with have expressed extreme interest already...

i currently own a canon XL1 and a VX2000 that ive used along the way to shoot sports films that were latter sold on dvd's in stores...

My question i need answered....

are my two cameras gonna be good enough for what i now want to acheive, that being an acted - skrpited project, that will be shown in theater... or do i simply need to go over to a 16mm/ 35mm film camera...

any advice / help would be greatly aprechaited...

i know this is my first post ive jsut come accross this site through a search

thank you
MEKHAEL
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 10 July 2006 - 09:19 PM

You shoot with the best format you can reasonably afford to shoot and post. If you can afford to use something better than a Canon XL1 and Sony VX2000, you should, but if you can't, you can't.

There's no magic format dividing line here. Just be aware that 35mm is sort of the industry standard by which everything is judged, but that well-shot Super-16 and pro-HD compete well and can look fine on a big screen.

Within that and below that, there are many gradations of picture quality of course. I saw a 35mm reel of "The Thing About My Folks", a Paul Reiser comedy shot on the 480/24P pro camera, the Panasonic SDX900, it didn't look too bad, sort of like softer HD photography. But even though this is a standard def camera, it does 24P at 4:2:2 / 50 Mb/sec when using the DVCPRO-50 setting, and has 2/3" CCD's and takes pro HD lenses.

I would at least try and make a step up to the 24P prosumer cameras like the Canon XL2 or Panasonic DVX100B for more of a "film look" compared to shooting standard 60i. And beyond those are the new consumer HDV cameras like the Canon XLH1, Panasonic HVX200, and JVC HD100.

But shoot what you can afford to shoot, don't break the bank just to shoot on an expensive camera with nothing left to make the movie on.
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#3 Scott Fritzshall

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Posted 10 July 2006 - 10:11 PM

But shoot what you can afford to shoot, don't break the bank just to shoot on an expensive camera with nothing left to make the movie on.

Indeed; this is one of the most common mistakes I see people making. People put all of their money into a new video camera, and don't even have money left over for a tripod.

We can't tell you what format to shoot on because we don't know your budget, what your movie is about, or any details about your production. You've got to decide how happy you are with the results you get from the cameras you've got, and whether you've got the budget for something better. Keep in mind that in addition to the camera, you'll need lights, production design, transportation, catering, etc.
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#4 mekhael trepanier

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Posted 10 July 2006 - 10:54 PM

thanks to both of you for the input

i think i am asnwering my questions at the same time

i was under the impression that something shot with DV would have no possible chance of being shown in a movie theater and being released for production at a latter date...

after watchign the trailer NOVEMBER i was inspired to get my work done with DV

if anyone else can offer anything more to look into that would greatly apreahciated...

thanks
MEKHAEL
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#5 Brian Dzyak

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Posted 13 July 2006 - 11:41 AM

thanks to both of you for the input

i think i am asnwering my questions at the same time

i was under the impression that something shot with DV would have no possible chance of being shown in a movie theater and being released for production at a latter date...

after watchign the trailer NOVEMBER i was inspired to get my work done with DV

if anyone else can offer anything more to look into that would greatly apreahciated...

thanks
MEKHAEL


I don't have much else to add that hasn't already been said. When it's all said and done, the audience will forgive a less than perfect picture as long as the story has entertained them thoroughly. So don't get too caught up in the technology at the expense of story and character.

As has been said, use the best equipment that you can reasonably afford. Just about anything can be transferred "up" to 35mm quality, but obviously at a price. "Uprezzing" from a lower quality to a higher quality format will obviously leave you with a less than ideal product, so acquire the best images possible on set with your final distribution format in mind. If it's just going to the internet, you won't need much. If it's going to be projected on a large screen, be mindful of how a miniDV image will look up there.

One other thing to keep in mind. Something I've noticed in my career is the psychological impact that a camera can have on the cast and crew. The larger and more professional looking the camera is, the more seriously everyone there takes the project and their jobs. You can pour your heart, soul, and money into great sets, props, and even pay SAG Actors, but the minute they walk in and see a camera sitting there that could be stepped on like a small cat, the enthusiasm generally drops. It's a mind game thing that I've seen more than you'd think. It shouldn't matter but it does.

Good luck!
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#6 mekhael trepanier

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Posted 13 July 2006 - 08:14 PM

thanks brian

and what you said is so true about the camera...

i am honestly what im shure most of the guys on this site would call a beginer... i know what i like and watch movies over and over to study the movements of a camera

but its funny before i got my XL1 i had a 800$ little dv camera and no one took it seriuosly as soon as i showed up with the XL1 people asumed i new what i was doing haha its funny at the same time but its true how it works

thanks for your input

MEKHAEL
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