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#1 Ravi Walia

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Posted 11 July 2006 - 05:14 AM

Hi, how do you light people glamorously indoor or outdoors when they are wearing goggles which can reflect lights in 180 radius. The deal is to not to see lights in their glasses. thanks lama
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#2 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 11 July 2006 - 08:04 AM

Hi, how do you light people glamorously indoor or outdoors when they are wearing goggles which can reflect lights in 180 radius. The deal is to not to see lights in their glasses. thanks lama


A pola filter would be the first step in eliminating glare from shiny surfaces. Rotate the filter to achieve the minimum glare.

Here is a simple tutorial about polarizing filters and reducing glare:

http://www.polarizat...ater/water.html
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#3 Chad Stockfleth

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Posted 11 July 2006 - 09:43 AM

This is going to sound simple, but move the lights (up or down, side to side) until you no longer see the glare (while trying to maintain a pleasing light on your subject), or if they reflect so wide an area that you can't get rid of it, move them into such a position that the glare looks pleasing (shiney surfaces do reflect in real life). John's Polarizer is a good idea too.

Good Luck!
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#4 Bob Hayes

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Posted 11 July 2006 - 09:49 AM

Fortunately goggles hide much of the actors face so you can place the lights to hide them rather then light the face. It?s all about angle of reflection. You can place your lights high or low. Experiment with hard sources which are obvious but easier to keep out. Soft sources can sneak in and be less offensive. Try creating irregular light sources that look more natural. Indoors I?ll cover a desk with white papers so the reflection looks like it?s coming from the desk. Cut out a shape that looks like a lamp shade; put it on your diffusion frame. My Favorite is to put tape on a 4x4 frame and make it look like a window.
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#5 Ravi Walia

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Posted 12 July 2006 - 12:26 AM

A pola filter would be the first step in eliminating glare from shiny surfaces. Rotate the filter to achieve the minimum glare.

Here is a simple tutorial about polarizing filters and reducing glare:

http://www.polarizat...ater/water.html


Thanks for your help.Can I use polarizing filter indoors also?The filter will eat 11/2 to 2 stops of light. Thanks lama
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#6 Chris Pritzlaff

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Posted 15 July 2006 - 02:59 AM

I look at movies like the Matrix and hate to think what they must have gone through to hide lights from so many sunglasses. I recently finished a shoot where a lead wore sunglasses the entire time and in reviewing the footage i noticed that lights and occasionally crew snuck into many of the shots. I don't think most people will notice it, but it was one of my concerns and I was constantly having to move thigngs to avoid them getting in the shot. Ultimately, they managed to sneak in anyway.
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#7 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 15 July 2006 - 03:17 AM

You'll notice in the Matrix sequels they didn't try and hide the reflection, they just made sure it was a clean square of light, sometimes taped to look like a windowframe but not always.

When you have to deal with an extremely curved surface, like the spacesuit visor I dealt with in "The Astronaut Farmer" you come to the conclusion that any light that is hitting the actor's eyes will be reflected, and if it's moved to an off-angle far enough to not be reflected, it's probably also not lighting the eyes anymore.

So given that the light will be reflected, you have a couple of choices. One is to use a hard light, maybe from one side, so that all you have is a single bright hotspot in the glass. Another is to use a soft light that creates a neat square reflection (like from a Chimera -- in other words, you don't want to see c-stands reflected as well so the diffusion frame has to be surrounded by black), maybe with a grid pattern of black stripes to make it look like a windowpane.

The third option, which is what I did in "The Astronaut Farmer" is to let the face be lit with practical sources and available light. In other words, what you see reflected is a lampshade or the real sun & sky, whatever. In my case, I had a small flourescent worklight built into the capsule that would light the face and be a logical reflection in the visor. In "Jackpot" I shot a pair of hands reflected in some sunglasses, and lit the hands so brightly that the bounce off of them was what exposed the face.
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#8 Adam Frisch FSF

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Posted 15 July 2006 - 05:37 AM

I seem to be the only one on this planet who doesn't mind reflections of lights in sunglasses. Why is it such a bad thing if it's kind of non-descript? Nobody would think twice about eliminating reflections from an eye, as a comparison.
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#9 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 15 July 2006 - 09:50 AM

I seem to be the only one on this planet who doesn't mind reflections of lights in sunglasses. Why is it such a bad thing if it's kind of non-descript?


That's the key, though, isn't it -- "non-descript"? As in "not distracting"?

I agree, something has to be reflected there usually. Although sometimes I've been willing to see a light reflected in glasses... only to have the director freak out in dailies and order some expensive digital paint job to remove it, and yell at me for accepting it -- hence why sometimes it's safer to eliminate it as much as possible just in case the producers, director, clients, etc. don't share your theories on what's an "acceptable" reflection. I've had director's freeze a frame in telecine, zoom into the glasses, and then point out some reflection that you'd never notice when the image was running at normal speed and at normal screen size.
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#10 Ravi Walia

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Posted 18 July 2006 - 09:49 AM

The other day I was watching charlie`s Angels on dvd(do'nt know which part,the one shot by Russell carpanter).The reflections of lights is avoided so effectively that it is imperssive.Btw was any diffuser used on the lense for three glamrous actors plus lots of frontal light? Thanks lama
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