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Janusz Kaminski


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#1 Mike Dunn

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Posted 11 July 2006 - 02:03 PM

Just watched War of the Worlds again and am wondering what Janusz did to get the look of that film. Seems like he just loads up the camera with diffusion filters and overexposes. Does anybody know any more info on this? Is there a bleach bypass involved? It's been a number of years since I shot anything on film so I'm a little out of practice with it. Thanks!
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 11 July 2006 - 02:08 PM

The prints used a silver retention process like ENR. The negative was a mix of Fuji and Kodak, with Classic Soft diffusion filters, occasionally a few nets.
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#3 Mike Dunn

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Posted 11 July 2006 - 02:21 PM

The prints used a silver retention process like ENR. The negative was a mix of Fuji and Kodak, with Classic Soft diffusion filters, occasionally a few nets.


Thanks for the quick feedback David! Seems like he uses a similar technique on most of his Spielberg movies, but this one stood out the most. Off topic, a friend just told me that Kodak has stopped spending any money on film R&D. Have you heard about this?
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#4 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 11 July 2006 - 03:07 PM

Off topic, a friend just told me that Kodak has stopped spending any money on film R&D. Have you heard about this?


Kodak continues to spend millions of dollars annually on motion-picture film R&D. Kodak is also investing in "hybrid" and digital technology for motion pictures. 2005 set a record for Kodak motion-picture film volumes, but you don't "rest on your laurels".
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#5 Mike Dunn

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Posted 11 July 2006 - 03:22 PM

Kodak continues to spend millions of dollars annually on motion-picture film R&D. Kodak is also investing in "hybrid" and digital technology for motion pictures. 2005 set a record for Kodak motion-picture film volumes, but you don't "rest on your laurels".


Thanks, but what is the hybrid thing all about?
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#6 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 11 July 2006 - 03:33 PM

Thanks, but what is the hybrid thing all about?


"Hybrid" technology is using digital technology to improve the use of film. Everything from improved scanners for telecines like the Spirit, to films specifically designed for scanning like 7299, to tools like Look Manager and Display Manager and Digital ICE:

http://www.kodak.com...s...4.4.6&lc=en

http://www.kodak.com...s....4.22&lc=en

http://www.kodak.com...s....4.24&lc=en

http://www.kodak.com...s....4.26&lc=en

http://www.theasc.co...sidebar/pg1.htm

Philips Digital Video Systems
Eastman Kodak's Spirit DataCine

1998 Emmy awarded to Michael Broesamle, Uwe Braehler, Volker Massmann and Wolfgang Steinebach of Philips Digital Video Systems and Arthur J. Cosgrove, Andrew F. Kurtz, Roger T. Lees and Leslie G. Moore of Eastman Kodak for the design and manufacture of the industry-standard high-definition digital telecine.

The Spirit DataCine Film Scanner is a joint development between Philips Digital Video Systems and Eastman Kodak. The combination of the Advanced Imaging Head from Eastman, and the precision transport mechanisms and high-speed digital signal processing developed by Philips, has resulted in a new benchmark for high-quality film transfers in both standard-definition and high-definition video standards and high-speed data scanning.


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#7 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 11 July 2006 - 08:01 PM

Kodak just completed updating their entire product line last year, finishing with 5201 (Vision-2 50D), which completes the Vision-2 series for now, unless they think of some completely new type of stock.

So I'd cut them some slack. There used to be only one motion picture color neg film in release at a time, then only two, now we've got six or so to choose from. We've gotten spoiled. I remember a time when DP's complained that there were too many changes to the stocks; just when they got used to using a particular one, it was obsoleted.

Generally a line-up exists for about five years before the next generation, maybe less. It's too early for Vision-3!
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#8 K Borowski

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Posted 11 July 2006 - 11:09 PM

Kodak has all but stopped research on Ektachrome, killed Kodachrome R&D for almost 20 years now, drastically slowed research on C-41 (theyr'e only now introducing double-electron sensitization A.K.A Vision 2 into their Porta film, and only in the 800 series), but they're still pumping all kinds of research into the prospect of "Vision 3". There's still one more electron that can be generated from the latent image process. After that though, that might very well be the end of the line for film improvements. There are certainly more improvements that can be made after the next generation of films, but I don't know how much longer film is going to generate enough revenue to justify R&D. What really worries me is the prospect of Kodak optimizing film primarily for DI and moving away completely from traditional photochemical finishes. Cinematography (generally) follows a lot of the same trends as does still photography in terms of stock improvements. They've been optimizing C-41 for scanning over traditional optical printing, and optimizing RA-4 paper for laser rather than enlarger output, so expect MP films to move in that direction too. Oh, and not that this effects cinematography at all, but I have a friend in the company that says Kodak is going to be cutting more products from its still lineup, so there definitely is a lot of restructuring still going on behind the walls of the big K.

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~Karl Borowski
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#9 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 12 July 2006 - 12:32 AM

The question is whether 35mm film needs to be continually improved; it's hard to say because what seems great now might seem inadequate in the future, especially in comparison to something new. With digital getting closer and closer in quality, I think some people would probably feel that now it would be a mistake to make film even finer-grained when that just plays into the digital aethetic that grain is bad. I don't necessarily agree with that -- I like fine-grained films and it helps the smaller formats out -- but at some point, film may have to embrace its classic look as an alternative to digital rather than compete with future digital formats for being sharp and fine-grained (this is assuming a future where digital has overcome its current limitations compared to 35mm.)

I don't really have an answer, just questioning the need for constant updating of stocks. To me, it's a little like the notion that a healthy economy is one that is always growing. That just doesn't seem natural.

I agree that it would be nice to come up with some stocks that were snappy and saturated without the need for a D.I. -- I'd love a color neg stock that had a rich slide film look to it.

I think it's also time to bite the bullet and come out with a faster-than-500 ASA stock to compete with the notion that only digital cameras can shoot in super low-light levels. Who cares if it's a little grainy if it gives us night photography in available light with a wide latitude.

So for now, I propose three new Kodak or Fuji stocks:

- A low-con, slow-speed stock to be a companion to either Expression 500T or '99, maybe 160T or 100D.

- A higher-con, higher saturation medium speed stock, fast enough for interior work but not too grainy for day work, maybe a 250T stock.

- A normal contrast, super high-speed stock like Vision-2 1600T.
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