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succesfull projects shot in FULL dv


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#1 mekhael trepanier

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Posted 11 July 2006 - 08:17 PM

i hope my title was clear enough

but im wondering if anyone can start up a list of movies/ films that were made relaesed and are now being sold that were shot in 100% DV whatever camera just DV... preferably without a mini 35 if you happen to know or not...

just wanting to get some ideas by watching as to what the final outcomes can be

thanks ahead of time

and also if there are links for purchase would be cool too
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 11 July 2006 - 10:32 PM

Off the top of my head...

There are all the Indigent movies: Pieces of April, Tadpole, Personal Velocity, November

Also: 28 Days Later (with a little film at the end), The Chateau, The Idiots, The Celebration, Chelsea Walls, Full Frontal, Dancer in the Dark, Chuck and Buck, The Puffy Chair (in some theaters right now)

Most of these predate 24P DV cameras though except for November.
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#3 Dan Goulder

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Posted 11 July 2006 - 11:21 PM

Two of the most successful (profitable, wide release) dramatic features shot in DV would be Open Water and 28 Days later. Open Water in particular was notable for the fact that everthing was shot by a 2-man crew, one of which was also the director and editor, with Sony mini-dv cameras. I believe a third person was brought in to do the scoring. It ended up on 2,700 screens, doing 52 million worldwide. The theatrical film out looked pretty decent, too. So, it's not impossible...
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#4 Eric Steelberg ASC

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Posted 11 July 2006 - 11:28 PM

My friend and longtime AC shot a feature coming out in theaters called PUSH. It was shot on a DVX100 with a Mini35 adaptor. Check it out on IMDb.
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#5 Luke Prendergast

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Posted 11 July 2006 - 11:50 PM

I rather liked 'The Anniversary Party' on DVD, didn't see it projected. The look was not at all obtrusive or innapropriate.
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#6 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 12 July 2006 - 12:00 AM

I rather liked 'The Anniversary Party' on DVD, didn't see it projected. The look was not at all obtrusive or innapropriate.


That was shot with the PAL 16x9 DSR-500 DVCAM I believe. I think most of "24 Hour Party People" was shot with a similar camera. Those are DV movies... but with pro cameras with larger CCD's and interchangeable lenses. There have been some nice-looking PAL Digital Betacam movies too, like "Italian for Beginners" and "Buena Vista Social Club".

And of course the DVC-PRO movies like Paul Reiser's "The Thing About My Folks" and James Franco's "The Ape" using the Panasonic 24P/480 SDX900 ("The Ape" used some DVX100 footage too.) But the SDX900 is on a much higher plane, quality-wise, than the DVX100.
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#7 Rod Otaviano

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Posted 12 July 2006 - 12:12 AM

"The Lonesome Jim" (2005) and "Sorry, Haters" (2005) are coming to DVD in August. Both shot on a DVX100.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0385056/

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0425600/
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#8 Richard Boddington

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Posted 12 July 2006 - 09:05 AM

Man these guys amaze me, both movies may be DV but they both have name talent in them.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0385056/

This one has Liv Tyler.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0425600/

This one has Sandra Oh.

I wonder how they pulled that off? They got their scripts to these actors and they decided to do it based on the artistic merits? Or they used DV and put all the money into paying actors rather than spending it on 35mm and the huge costs associated with it?

Either way, good for them.

R,
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#9 mekhael trepanier

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Posted 12 July 2006 - 10:30 AM

Two of the most successful (profitable, wide release) dramatic features shot in DV would be Open Water and 28 Days later. Open Water in particular was notable for the fact that everthing was shot by a 2-man crew, one of which was also the director and editor, with Sony mini-dv cameras. I believe a third person was brought in to do the scoring. It ended up on 2,700 screens, doing 52 million worldwide. The theatrical film out looked pretty decent, too. So, it's not impossible...




if im understanding this correctly...

both those films are shot created with DV cameras and then when all is said and done they take the final product and convert it into 35mm flm so it can shown on the big screen ??

is this as simple as taking a master mini DV tape in and paying im assuming alot of money to get it transfered to film... or am i way off...
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#10 Richard Boddington

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Posted 12 July 2006 - 11:07 AM

DV to film transfers are quite expensive, $30,000.00-$50,000.00 depending on length and who does it via what process, etc etc.

The thing I don't get about a film like Open Water is that they put the 35mm transfer onto the DVDs. This meant the picture was actually soft and had that DV to film look.

For the DVDs why didn't they put the DV version straight to the DVD? It would have looked sharper and cleaner on a TV than the film version.

One other point for you....why shoot Mini DV? Why not shoot HDV? The HDV cameras are so cheap now, and will give you double the lines of resolution over standard DV. The B&H Photo site sells used ones dirt cheap, as does ebay. You record onto standard Mini DV tape.

This web site has helpful hints for getting DV and HDV onto Film.

www.dvfilm.com/faq.htm

R,
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#11 Rod Otaviano

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Posted 12 July 2006 - 11:38 AM

The thing I don't get about a film like Open Water is that they put the 35mm transfer onto the DVDs.


Is this a common practice for digital movies ? (what about super 16mm movies? ... I know they did that on "Primer" ... ). I know it's probably a stupid question, but what's the idea behind that ?

I saw "November" on DVD and kind of liked that slight grainy texture. Does anybody know if the they put the dv version straight to the DVD or used the 35mm transfer ?

Edited by Rodrigo Otaviano, 12 July 2006 - 11:41 AM.

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#12 Richard Boddington

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Posted 12 July 2006 - 11:53 AM

Well Primer was 16mm as you point out. So the film would need to be transfered to tape first, then the tape transfer would go to DVD. Standard practice for movies shot on film.

My point was that of you shoot on DV, then put the DV version to DVD, it will look better than the DV to 35mm and back to tape version.

R,
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#13 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 12 July 2006 - 12:00 PM

Depends on your definition of "better" -- sharper and cleaner, yes, but some filmmakers use the telecine of the film transfer instead of the original SD interlaced-photography as a very expensive "film look" filtering... Not necessary if they had shot in 24P SD or HD in the first place; most of those movies use the original video master for DVD, not a telecine. But for 60i/50i photography, some people feel it looks too "raw" in the original.
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#14 Rod Otaviano

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Posted 12 July 2006 - 12:04 PM

Well Primer was 16mm as you point out. So the film would need to be transfered to tape first, then the tape transfer would go to DVD. Standard practice for movies shot on film.


Yeah I know but I think I've seen somewhere that in Primer, the DVD version originated from the 35mm transfer (maybe I'm mistaken here ...). So I didn't understand why they would do that if they could "simply" transfer from the tape straight to DVD.
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#15 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 12 July 2006 - 12:12 PM

I don't know how "Primer" was posted, but assuming an optical printer blow-up to 35mm, odds are high that the original 16mm negative was spliced either in A-B "checkerboard" rolls or single-strand with frame handles on each side of the cut. Either would be difficult and dangerous to retransfer to video at that point.

At that point, you'd make a color-timed 16mm IP from the negative and then an optical printer blow-up to a 35mm IN. Or go directly from the original negative to a 35mm IP.

So they may have used either a 16mm IP, 35mm IP, or 35mm IN for the telecine transfer. The 35mm versions would have been made in an optical printer, whereas the 16mm IP would have been made in a contact printer.

The original video transfer off of the negative for dailies and NLE cutting were probably too cheap and low-rez for making a good final video master for DVD. Usually dailies transfers are done on older Ranks onto some tape format like Beta-SP. Final video transfers for home video are now usually done to HD-D5 or something, the downconversions to Digital Betacam for NTSC and PAL.
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#16 Richard Boddington

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Posted 12 July 2006 - 12:30 PM

"Yeah I know but I think I've seen somewhere that in Primer, the DVD version originated from the 35mm transfer"

OK I see what you're saying, about the 35mm part of the equation. In that case I'm like David I don't know what they did?

If it where me and I shot on 16mm, I would use the 16mm to D-Beta or HD transfer for the DVD.

R,
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#17 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 12 July 2006 - 12:37 PM

I did a Super-16 feature where the negative was zero-cut to allow a blow-up directly to a 35mm IP, then an IN to print. So we did the final transfer using this 35mm IP, which was color-timed, had no splices, etc. But since it had been made in an optical printer, some dust had been photographed into the image.

But I never got a straight answer from the colorists if they would have preferred to work with a contact-printed Super-16 IP instead of the optically-printed 35mm IP. Using the original negative was out at this point since it was spliced with frame handles.
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#18 Abel Klainbaum

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Posted 12 July 2006 - 01:50 PM

You also have to check out Barbet Schroeder's Our Lady of the Assassins...
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#19 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 12 July 2006 - 05:09 PM

You also have to check out Barbet Schroeder's Our Lady of the Assassins...


That was shot in 60i/1080 HD though.
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#20 Sean Azze

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Posted 12 July 2006 - 05:54 PM

Man these guys amaze me, both movies may be DV but they both have name talent in them.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0385056/

This one has Liv Tyler.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0425600/

This one has Sandra Oh.

I wonder how they pulled that off? They got their scripts to these actors and they decided to do it based on the artistic merits? Or they used DV and put all the money into paying actors rather than spending it on 35mm and the huge costs associated with it?

Either way, good for them.

R,


I don't know enough about Jeff Stanzler to determine if he's got any pull in the industry, but Lonesome Jim was directed by Steve Buscemi. That dude's got enough name recognition and credibility to get some well known people in his films. At the very least Liv Tyler knows him from their work on Armageddon.
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