Jump to content


AC equipment


  • Please log in to reply
11 replies to this topic

#1 stoop

stoop
  • Guests

Posted 12 July 2006 - 07:22 AM

I'm looking for a good UK website that can equip me with all I need for future AC work. Film tools.com has some great stuff but charge $140 to send a couple of rolls of tape to the uk - riduclus

Any companies, websites would be greatly appreciated.

James
  • 0

#2 Stephen Murphy

Stephen Murphy
  • Guests

Posted 12 July 2006 - 07:43 AM

Talk to the stores department in Arri Media and/or Panavision.
  • 0

#3 Vincent De Paula

Vincent De Paula
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 52 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Vancouver / Los Angeles

Posted 12 July 2006 - 11:23 AM

That's a Wrap in Shepperton would have pretty much everything you need.

http://www.taw.eu.com/

They are also very competitive with prices and whatever they don't have in stock, they'll get it for you.

Take care
  • 0

#4 Daniel Stigler

Daniel Stigler
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 177 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • Berlin, Germany

Posted 12 July 2006 - 04:02 PM

I'm looking for a good UK website that can equip me with all I need for future AC work. Film tools.com has some great stuff but charge $140 to send a couple of rolls of tape to the uk - riduclus


You are moving from camera operator to AC? How come?
Be aware that you will get a lot of the stuff you'll need for AC work at hardware stores, photo stores, hiking and sailing supply stores and special tools can usually be bought from camera rental places which you will have to visit anyways to prep the gear.
It makes no sense to buy your own tape. It's a standard on expedables lists (along with eyecushions, Kimwhipes, DustOff, ...) and production pays for those.
  • 0

#5 stoop

stoop
  • Guests

Posted 13 July 2006 - 03:16 AM

You are moving from camera operator to AC? How come?
Be aware that you will get a lot of the stuff you'll need for AC work at hardware stores, photo stores, hiking and sailing supply stores and special tools can usually be bought from camera rental places which you will have to visit anyways to prep the gear.
It makes no sense to buy your own tape. It's a standard on expedables lists (along with eyecushions, Kimwhipes, DustOff, ...) and production pays for those.



Well, Iv'e been a stills photographer for a year and then a Video camera operator for 2-3 years, but it's Film and Hi-end productions that I really want to work on. So the best way is for me to start as an AC.. I have the talent, so I'm hoping I can move up to operating fairly quickly.

Thanks for your tips with the AC gear, cheers!

James
  • 0

#6 Hans Engstrom

Hans Engstrom
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 195 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • Sweden

Posted 13 July 2006 - 05:14 AM

I don´t know how much you know about ACing so I´m just going to type down some of the stuff that I think is good to have in your kit.

Buy yourself 2 measuring tapes, one soft and one of steel. Order empty cans, bags, cores, film reports, stickers from a lab (free of charge) so that you are prepared if you get hired on short notice. Buy orangewood sticks (to clean the gate), shower caps (to put over mattebox when it´s raining) and one make-up retractable brush (to brush away dust from filters) from a store that have a beauty dept. Get som hex keys, screwdrivers, multitool, polygrip, flashlight a.s.o. from any hardwear store. It´s also good to have a multimeter and a soldering kit for repairing cables. I also allways have an extra loading sack with me as a spare. I once had a loading tent that wouldn´t close properly and stuff like that can really freak you out and steal valuable time. Get some nice cases and/or bags to keep your stuff in.

These are just some of the stuff that I come to think of now sitting in front of my computer typing. Eventually you will add/remove/replace stuff so that you have the right tools that will fit your need. Then when it´s time to checkout your rental equip you get tape, kenair, lens tissues, lenscleaning fluid, eyecushions, pencils, scenecards and all other expendables you need.

Good luck and remember that the better you are prepared for work the easier and the more fun it will be. It´s the little things that can be the difference between having a good time and doing a good job or worrying/struggling and doing a bad job. Tiny things like if you forgotten to bring insulation for your batteries when it´s -25C will make you constantly worrying about them going out and taking focus from other important duties.
  • 0

#7 Daniel Stigler

Daniel Stigler
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 177 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • Berlin, Germany

Posted 13 July 2006 - 08:13 AM

shower caps (to put over mattebox when it´s raining)

Tiny things like if you forgotten to bring insulation for your batteries when it´s -25C will make you constantly worrying about them going out and taking focus from other important duties.



I use a XXL backpack raincover you can get at hiking stores. It covers the whole camera.

What do you use to shield the batteries?
  • 0

#8 Hans Engstrom

Hans Engstrom
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 195 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • Sweden

Posted 13 July 2006 - 08:41 AM

I use a XXL backpack raincover you can get at hiking stores. It covers the whole camera.

What do you use to shield the batteries?


Backpack raincover usually comes with the rental equipment and I have one of my own as well. Dry cleaning plastic bags are also good for protection against rain.

I put the blockbatteries in soft isolated cooling bags to protect them from cold, for smaller on camera batteries I make my own isolation. I also use bags that contain some chemicals in them so that when they are opened and exposed to air they becomes warm and stays that way for some hours. They are great if you need to keep the groundglass of a pro/mini35 spinning in extreme cold temperature. Just put them inside a sock and attach it to the adapter and add some isolation, also remember to keep the glass spinning all the time as that helps as well. I also have a 12V seatwarmer that I run of a battery thats designed to help starting cars. This battery is great as it also can be used to power a monitor on the set, my own 16BL, or keep the snowboy from freezing.
  • 0

#9 Hal Smith

Hal Smith
  • Sustaining Members
  • 2280 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • OKC area

Posted 13 July 2006 - 08:47 AM

The Gerber multi-tool is by far the best. In the US, Lowe's sells them for $50. There's nothing more impressive than taking your Gerber out of its pouch and giving it the wrist flick that opens it.

On a dark note - there are always hangers-on with sticky fingers around many sets - particularly locations. Don't leave stuff lie around, it looks un-professional and it's apt to sprout legs behind your back.
  • 0

#10 Hans Engstrom

Hans Engstrom
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 195 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • Sweden

Posted 13 July 2006 - 09:00 AM

Just forgotten to add that the showercaps are to be used as a complement to the raincover just to help you avoid getting raindrops, snowflakes on the lens/filter between takes. They are also great in dusty location or when its a lot of pollen in the air. And they are so easy to put on and take of that they look to made for the purpose.

I also use a Gerber multi-tool and loves it, sometimes I even cut down branches and small trees with it.

Edited by Hans Engstrom, 13 July 2006 - 09:02 AM.

  • 0

#11 Daniel Madsen

Daniel Madsen
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 201 posts
  • Student
  • Boston

Posted 13 July 2006 - 03:25 PM

How many small trees do you cut down on the typical shoot? ;)
  • 0

#12 Hans Engstrom

Hans Engstrom
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 195 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • Sweden

Posted 17 July 2006 - 04:57 PM

How many small trees do you cut down on the typical shoot? ;)


Around 20 on a musicvideo I worked on :) Helped the camera operator so that he wouldn´t trip. We where just hanging around waiting for the sun to set and figured we could clear his path from obstacles. Why let the PAs have all the fun ;)
  • 0


Paralinx LLC

The Slider

Aerial Filmworks

Wooden Camera

Visual Products

Abel Cine

Metropolis Post

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Opal

CineTape

Tai Audio

Willys Widgets

Glidecam

FJS International, LLC

Rig Wheels Passport

rebotnix Technologies

Ritter Battery

Technodolly

CineLab

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

rebotnix Technologies

The Slider

Tai Audio

Metropolis Post

Abel Cine

CineTape

Technodolly

FJS International, LLC

Aerial Filmworks

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Willys Widgets

Visual Products

Wooden Camera

Ritter Battery

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Glidecam

Rig Wheels Passport

Paralinx LLC

CineLab

Opal