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Televangelism


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#1 Ckulakov

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Posted 12 July 2006 - 06:37 PM

I am shooting a Televangelism program and i am using one harsh elipsoidal type light mounted on the ceiling, one diffused floor key light that helps soften up the key side, a fill light at a lowered and side position (helps get rid of harsh chin shadow). I also have two clean backlights mounted above, AND a raw floor-stand light at a kicker position. The question is: Is it ok if the kicker light creates a bit of overexposure on the back cheek area (it is almost the brightest area of the frame)? It looks a lot more intresting and livens up the image (defines his figure)...but could it be annoying?

THANKS

ALSO what do you think about the setup as a whole?
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#2 Chad Stockfleth

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Posted 12 July 2006 - 06:39 PM

Hot kicker is fairly normal....how hot is too hot? only you (and your client) can decide. Remember, there is no right or wrong....do what you think looks good.
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#3 Mario C. Jackson

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Posted 12 July 2006 - 08:15 PM

Why would you even want a hard kicker if you already have two strong backlights and 2 other sources hitting your subject in front. I usually don't use a back light on the subject if I have a kicker. But it is totally up to you. There is not one set way.
God Bless on your shoot
Hope this helps
Mario Concepcion Jackson
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#4 Erik Rubner

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Posted 12 July 2006 - 08:46 PM

A few questions. What does the person look like? White, Black, Bald, Glasses? What is he wearing? Is he stationary or moving about the stage? What is the background?

As a matter of taste I tend to favor a more simple approach in general. Start with the right Key and Edger and go from there. One of the most important things is knowing when to stop lighting.
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#5 Ckulakov

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Posted 12 July 2006 - 11:17 PM

just a pic i found in in google of a random news studio:

Posted Image



.....IS THIS CONSIDERED OVER-LIGHTING?
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#6 Michael Nash

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Posted 13 July 2006 - 12:20 AM

just a pic i found in in google of a random news studio:

Posted Image
.....IS THIS CONSIDERED OVER-LIGHTING?


No, this is just considered high-key lighting.
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#7 Chris Cooke

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Posted 13 July 2006 - 06:41 PM

No, this is just considered high-key lighting.


Exactly. Actually, a lot of those lights aren't even aimed at the talent, they're for background hilights and overall background exposure/color seperation. It looks like they're using a lot of 2K fresnels and I see one image 80 kino flo as their key light. Do you see that light really low next to the cameras? That's their eyelight. Whose the televangelist? Does he like to walk around? Is it a one camera shoot?
It's really difficult to create nice molding on their faces if your throwing between two or three cameras but the show becomes boring if you leave it on a single shot of the guy the whole time.
High-key lighting isn't necessarily a bad thing if it's going to draw the viewer into what the talent is saying. Just don't forget to create some sort of contrast in the frame. I normally light televangelists fairly high-key with a nice eyelight and a simple but not to in your face backlight and then have fun with the background.
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#8 Ckulakov

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Posted 13 July 2006 - 08:44 PM

The subject is Peter Kulakov (white, greyed black hair, no glasses). There is a burgandy backdrop for the background and he ussually stayes within three feet of the fixed pulpit position. There is one front camera with a teleprompter, and a side camera with a more 45 degree angle approach. I am very much against of high-key and am deciding how not to make it to low key.
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