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i need to boy a light for shotting in a sweet sixteen,help please!


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#1 J.B.

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Posted 14 July 2006 - 12:13 AM

ok,im going to shoot on a sweet sixteen,i have a canon xl1s,but i need to know what light is reliable, how many watts? i see there's some for 20w,30w,40w and some are 100w or 200w,the place im shooting is not to small,i think the dance floor is like the size of half a basketball court,my concern is,when the girl dances with the father,ussually they turn all the lights off,is 100 watts too much? anyone with an xl1s had an experience like that? please if you can give me an advice on what lights are good? im not counting with too much money now,just bought the xl1 :S ,i saw on ebay this halogen 100 w for 130,do you think this would get the job done?


one more thing,im planning on interviewing some people close to the family in a separate room,will that work there too?or there i need some other kind of lightning,and maybe one of those white screens (i think is for shine reflexions or something),im new on this and will really appretiate any comments,thanks for taking the time.have a good day!
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 14 July 2006 - 12:31 AM

Take the Canon over to where the dance will be held days in advance and see what the light conditions are like and how it looks on video.

I mean, are you even allowed to "light" this event anyway? IF so, and the real dance lighting is too low-level to be usable, I recommend a bunch of big, white Chinese Lanterns -- they put out a soft light, they are easy to rig to a ceiling, and they aren't ugly to look at for the people attending the dance. But this is assuming you even want to light-up this event to look good for video, versus just taking a documentary approach and recording the real room's lighting even if it means a noisy gain-boosted image. You don't want to just shine a bright light at people. IF you can add some lighting, you want it to be the BARE minimum necessary so you don't overpower the natural ambience, even if it means boosting the gain a little on the camera. The reality of the moment may mean more than getting a clean video recording.

Just be aware of how much power you have to draw on. Know how many amps each circuit has in the location and which outlets share the same circuit so you don't overload one circuit.

As for lighting interviews, you can use a Chinese Lantern or a bright light bounced off of a white card (like white foamcore or heavy posterboard from an art supply store) -- or both. One could be the key light and one could be a much weaker fill light. Again, keep the light level just low enough to shoot around a T/2.0 or T/2.8 at 0db, for example (setting everything manually on the camera. If you don't, working at a low level will cause the camera to automatically kick-on the gain to compensate once the f-stop is all the way open.)
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#3 Chad Stockfleth

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Posted 14 July 2006 - 11:20 AM

Take the Canon over to where the dance will be held days in advance and see what the light conditions are like and how it looks on video.

I mean, are you even allowed to "light" this event anyway? IF so, and the real dance lighting is too low-level to be usable, I recommend a bunch of big, white Chinese Lanterns -- they put out a soft light, they are easy to rig to a ceiling, and they aren't ugly to look at for the people attending the dance. But this is assuming you even want to light-up this event to look good for video, versus just taking a documentary approach and recording the real room's lighting even if it means a noisy gain-boosted image. You don't want to just shine a bright light at people. IF you can add some lighting, you want it to be the BARE minimum necessary so you don't overpower the natural ambience, even if it means boosting the gain a little on the camera. The reality of the moment may mean more than getting a clean video recording.

Just be aware of how much power you have to draw on. Know how many amps each circuit has in the location and which outlets share the same circuit so you don't overload one circuit.

As for lighting interviews, you can use a Chinese Lantern or a bright light bounced off of a white card (like white foamcore or heavy posterboard from an art supply store) -- or both. One could be the key light and one could be a much weaker fill light. Again, keep the light level just low enough to shoot around a T/2.0 or T/2.8 at 0db, for example (setting everything manually on the camera. If you don't, working at a low level will cause the camera to automatically kick-on the gain to compensate once the f-stop is all the way open.)


Ever patient, David. Not only are you a remarkable talent and intellect, but a willing teacher. Do you have any background in teaching?
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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 14 July 2006 - 11:25 AM

Do you have any background in teaching?


No, just talking about cinematography, hence why I hang out here.

I do occasionally talk to film students at my alma mater, CalArts.
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#5 J.B.

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Posted 14 July 2006 - 05:05 PM

Take the Canon over to where the dance will be held days in advance and see what the light conditions are like and how it looks on video.

I mean, are you even allowed to "light" this event anyway? IF so, and the real dance lighting is too low-level to be usable, I recommend a bunch of big, white Chinese Lanterns -- they put out a soft light, they are easy to rig to a ceiling, and they aren't ugly to look at for the people attending the dance. But this is assuming you even want to light-up this event to look good for video, versus just taking a documentary approach and recording the real room's lighting even if it means a noisy gain-boosted image. You don't want to just shine a bright light at people. IF you can add some lighting, you want it to be the BARE minimum necessary so you don't overpower the natural ambience, even if it means boosting the gain a little on the camera. The reality of the moment may mean more than getting a clean video recording.

Just be aware of how much power you have to draw on. Know how many amps each circuit has in the location and which outlets share the same circuit so you don't overload one circuit.

As for lighting interviews, you can use a Chinese Lantern or a bright light bounced off of a white card (like white foamcore or heavy posterboard from an art supply store) -- or both. One could be the key light and one could be a much weaker fill light. Again, keep the light level just low enough to shoot around a T/2.0 or T/2.8 at 0db, for example (setting everything manually on the camera. If you don't, working at a low level will cause the camera to automatically kick-on the gain to compensate once the f-stop is all the way open.)


thank you very much for taking the time and patience to answer,it will help me a lot,i dont know if you have any experience on the xl1s,but if so,what settings you recomend when shooting on manual position,i just dont want it to look like a home video,like if i shoot it with a 500 dolar jvc camera lol thanks again!!!
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#6 Michael Collier

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Posted 14 July 2006 - 06:00 PM

You don't want to just shine a bright light at people



wait, wait, wait...back up...I don't wanna shine bright lights at people? Man thats why I got in this business, well that and to have people hole up my white balance card. It has playboy playmate lauren andersen's autograph on it. I have pictures of the mayor, the govenor, our senator etc all holding up this card. Its not about the art...its about making people uncomfortable and foolish. lol.
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#7 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 14 July 2006 - 08:37 PM

i dont know if you have any experience on the xl1s


No, I don't. Maybe someone else here, but I would also take a look at the Canon XL Watchdog site:
http://www.dvinfo.net/canon/index.php
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#8 J.B.

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Posted 15 July 2006 - 01:59 PM

No, I don't. Maybe someone else here, but I would also take a look at the Canon XL Watchdog site:
http://www.dvinfo.net/canon/index.php



thank you again!!!! :D
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Rig Wheels Passport

Aerial Filmworks

Tai Audio

Visual Products

Wooden Camera

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

FJS International, LLC

CineTape

Technodolly

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Abel Cine

CineLab

Glidecam

Ritter Battery

The Slider

Paralinx LLC

Willys Widgets

rebotnix Technologies

Metropolis Post