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Scanning HD to 35mm 4:4:4


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#1 Chris Clarkson

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Posted 14 July 2006 - 10:31 AM

Hi everyone,

It's my first post so be gentle with me :)
We are going to Telecine super 16mm and grade it to HDCAM SR 4:4:4.
But the rest of the post process will be on an AVID SYMPHONY NITRIS at 4:2:2. This is because our kit only handles this at the moment.
Eventually the whole film will be scanned onto 35mm for theatrical release.
Now then... Will there be a quality issue in the scanning if we haven't post produced at 4:4:4.
(Just so you know, the reason we are not just scanning or blowing up the 16mm is that we have to also deliver a Television version in HD, so we will be scanning the HD colourised version)
Hoipe this makes sense

Cheers

Chris
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 14 July 2006 - 10:53 AM

It's possible but the image transferred to 35mm will pick up a slight video-ish feeling, just like when people use HDCAM or HD-D5 with linear video color space on the tape as a basis for a film-out.

If you saw "Dominion", the Exoricist prequel made by Paul Schrader in a theater, you know what I mean -- that was a 10-bit 4:2:2 linear image from an HD-D5 master for home video transferred to 35mm.

Film-outs are not easy and ideally you'd be correcting to create a 10-bit Log master for the film-out, and then do another pass to create a 10-bit Linear master for HD monitor display / home video.

As far as 4:4:4 versus 4:2:2, it would be a subtle difference in the feeling of depth and richness to the colors but you may not notice it, depending on the scene content. Plus it may lose a little sharpness if red or blue colors / lighting dominate the frame.

I think by the time the film-out company finishes tweaking your own color-timing for the film-out, you may have wished you had done the color-correction there to begin with, using a place that has set-up their system to produce a color-corrected 10-bit Log master optimized for a film-out, and then have the right LUT's for the laser recorder and another LUT to create the 10-bit linear master for home video / monitor viewing.

Without these LUT's or something like Kodak's LUT box (I forgot the name), it may be hard for you do your own timing on a computer monitor or HD CRT yet create something in Log space for a film-out. Which goes back to putting a version color-corrrected for home video out onto 35mm, which will pick-up some video-ish feeling, almost as if you had shot the movie on the F900, let's say.
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#3 Chris Clarkson

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Posted 14 July 2006 - 12:37 PM

Hi David,

Many thanks for the reply, I appreciate it.

Chris
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