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#1 Andy Yeomans

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Posted 15 July 2006 - 12:31 PM

I am going to be shooting some interviews (digitally) for a documentary. I want the interviews to have a 70's look somewhat and I'm looking for a filter to go along with post work. The interviews will be done in offices and I will not have a chance to do any pre-lighting or set backdrops...I will just be going in and shooting the interviews.

I'm not sure how to describe it best but saying I want the 70's look. I am looking for filter recommendations but anything will help, especially best lighting practices that are done on the spot.

Thanks

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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 15 July 2006 - 04:06 PM

I'm not sure how to describe it best but saying I want the 70's look.


You have to be more specific because 1970's movies had quite a wide range of looks. "Towering Inferno" looked nothing like "Bound for Glory".

It would be easier to answer your question if you had a specific movie in mind you wanted to model the photography on.
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#3 Andy Yeomans

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Posted 15 July 2006 - 10:35 PM

If I could think of a movie off hand I would tell you, but unfortunately I don't know that many movies from that time period. I come from still photography, and when I think of that 70's look, I think of old slide film that is somewhat desaturated and has a brownish hue to it.

But if I think of a movie, I will let you know.

Thanks

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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 16 July 2006 - 12:15 AM

If I could think of a movie off hand I would tell you, but unfortunately I don't know that many movies from that time period. I come from still photography, and when I think of that 70's look, I think of old slide film that is somewhat desaturated and has a brownish hue to it.

But if I think of a movie, I will let you know.

Thanks

Yeomans


If you don't know many movies from that period... how do you know you want to emulate their look? Isn't that like saying "I want my painting to be like something from the Italian Renaissance but I'm not sure what that looks like."

When you say "brownish hue", you don't mean an Ektachrome slide that has turned salmon / magenta / pink?

If you're shooting video, it would easy to desaturate the image in post with basic color-correction tools.

If you want to copy some of the diffusion of some films of that period, try filters like Fogs, Low-Cons, or Double-Fogs, which were popular then. They will also help soften the colors. As for a brownish look, a desaturated image that was originally warm will sort of fall towards the brownish by virtue of pulling down the chroma in the warm colors. So you could try a warming filter or white balance to make the image a little warm or using warming gels on the lights. Or if you really wanted brown, there are such things as Chocolate filters, although you lose at least a stop out of them.
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#5 Fredrik Backar FSF

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Posted 17 July 2006 - 03:27 AM

Just guessing what you want now...(chris milks Keyne west shots,,,,) and assuming maybe an IMX-camera. A simple thing like turning off all gamma dials and sharpening tools and white clips will get you far. White balance through 1/4 ctb and then desaturate in post. It´ll bring you towards china syndrome look - if that is where you are going.
As david said something soft on the lens might heighten that 70´s look (whatever that is now,,,,)
Last but not least! DONOTOVEREXPOSE!!

Edited by Fredrik Backar FSF, 17 July 2006 - 03:29 AM.

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#6 Andy Yeomans

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Posted 17 July 2006 - 12:17 PM

Thank you for the suggestions.

Puting the time period aside...what are the main steps in creating such a brown hue for shows like '24' and 'Numbers' and the movie 'The Arrival'?

This isn't what I was looking for but I am curious...is it mainly in the timing or is it filters?

Thanks
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#7 Fredrik Backar FSF

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Posted 17 July 2006 - 01:03 PM

Thank you for the suggestions.

Puting the time period aside...what are the main steps in creating such a brown hue for shows like '24' and 'Numbers' and the movie 'The Arrival'?

This isn't what I was looking for but I am curious...is it mainly in the timing or is it filters?

Thanks


Brown is very hard to grade I have found, so mabe try some filtration- chocolate or so. But! I´ve done test recently that showed that a 2stop pulling of the film gives wounderful earthy tones automatically.
In video; filtering and desaturation would be ok I guess.
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#8 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 17 July 2006 - 01:06 PM

Brown is very hard to grade I have found, so mabe try some filtration- chocolate or so. But! I´ve done test recently that showed that a 2stop pulling of the film gives wounderful earthy tones automatically.
In video; filtering and desaturation would be ok I guess.


The effect of a two stop pull can vary with the lab. Simply speeding up the processing machine may give borderline tail-end and wash times.
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#9 Andy Yeomans

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Posted 17 July 2006 - 08:48 PM

The closest look that I am going for is similar to 'Invincible'. Although the look of the 70's has a lot to do with set dressings and wardrobes and playing on colors of the time such as oranges and browns, this movie seems to be close to what I am looking for.

Edited by andyyeomans, 17 July 2006 - 08:49 PM.

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#10 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 17 July 2006 - 11:09 PM

So now instead of a 1970's movie... you want it to look like a 2006 movie that hasn't been released yet? Or did you mean the 2001 Herzog movie?

If you mean the upcoming movie that none of us have seen yet, couldn't you pick a movie that we might have seen?
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#11 Andy Yeomans

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Posted 17 July 2006 - 11:45 PM

I've based it on the previews that I have seen over and over. I like what I see in the minute that I get to see it.
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#12 Fredrik Backar FSF

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Posted 18 July 2006 - 03:20 AM

Did pulling test at http://www.stopost.se and the outcome was very nice on both the 5217 and the 5205. It came out with earthy textured skin and beautiful warmth.

Edited by Fredrik Backar FSF, 18 July 2006 - 03:21 AM.

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Glidecam

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Visual Products

Willys Widgets

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Metropolis Post

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Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Wooden Camera

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Tai Audio

rebotnix Technologies

Aerial Filmworks

Rig Wheels Passport

The Slider

FJS International, LLC