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lighting single frame vs. moving frame


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#1 Grainy

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Posted 15 July 2006 - 04:55 PM

hi folks!
I'm working on a project where I'm using a bolex and double exposures to have a stop-motion animated puppet on one side of the finished frame, and an actor on the other side. We're shooting the actor first with the lens blocked off on the left side, then rewinding and exposing on the right side of the film, frame by frame, to animate this little puppet that reacts to her actions.
Anyway, my question is, will the lighting needs be different with the stop motion when intermingled with live action like this? Is there something about exposing one frame at a time that'll make it not seemlessly blend with the 24fps stuff on the other half of the film?
thanks!
G
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#2 dudeguy37

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Posted 15 July 2006 - 05:55 PM

hi folks!
I'm working on a project where I'm using a bolex and double exposures to have a stop-motion animated puppet on one side of the finished frame, and an actor on the other side. We're shooting the actor first with the lens blocked off on the left side, then rewinding and exposing on the right side of the film, frame by frame, to animate this little puppet that reacts to her actions.
Anyway, my question is, will the lighting needs be different with the stop motion when intermingled with live action like this? Is there something about exposing one frame at a time that'll make it not seemlessly blend with the 24fps stuff on the other half of the film?
thanks!
G


I'm not so sure about the exposure side of it, but at the very least you will have one very noticable difference in that on the right side of your frame (with the real actress) you will have fluid filmic motion that we are all used to, and then, within the same finished frame, you'll have very choppy motion where the puppet is because motion blur can't occur in stop motion because you aren't using the shutter and advancing the film in sequence like you are with regular shooting. That's a technical explanation though, and for all I know it may look great when finished and give just enough strangle look to the puppet...who knows?! Anyway, good luck with the shoot.
Peace,

-Harry
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#3 Grainy

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Posted 15 July 2006 - 06:08 PM

I'm not so sure about the exposure side of it, but at the very least you will have one very noticable difference in that on the right side of your frame (with the real actress) you will have fluid filmic motion that we are all used to, and then, within the same finished frame, you'll have very choppy motion where the puppet is because motion blur can't occur in stop motion because you aren't using the shutter and advancing the film in sequence like you are with regular shooting. That's a technical explanation though, and for all I know it may look great when finished and give just enough strangle look to the puppet...who knows?! Anyway, good luck with the shoot.
Peace,

-Harry


Hi Harry --
Yeah, in this case, that's part of the intent, actually!
Which is fortunate, because we can't afford go-motion motors or any of that nutty stuff ;)
Thanks
G
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#4 Leo Anthony Vale

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Posted 17 July 2006 - 01:47 PM

Anyway, my question is, will the lighting needs be different with the stop motion when intermingled with live action like this? Is there something about exposing one frame at a time that'll make it not seemlessly blend with the 24fps stuff on the other half of the film?


---If you're using the Spring drive, the shutter speed for single frame is the same as 12fps, not 24fps.
You'll have to close down the shutter or use an ND for the stop motion pass.

---LV
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#5 Robert Hughes

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Posted 17 July 2006 - 02:19 PM

---If you're using the Spring drive, the shutter speed for single frame is the same as 12fps, not 24fps.
You'll have to close down the shutter or use an ND for the stop motion pass.

---LV

The reason for that is that the Bolex takes a frame or 2 to get up to speed. I've seen that occur on my Bolex.
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#6 Chris Keth

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Posted 17 July 2006 - 06:11 PM

The reason for that is that the Bolex takes a frame or 2 to get up to speed. I've seen that occur on my Bolex.



No, it's not related at all. <_< The shutter speed for single frame shots on a bolex is just different than for 24fps shooting.
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