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Purchasing 2x2 and larger reflector board


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#1 T-Spect Le

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Posted 16 July 2006 - 11:20 AM

Does anybody know where to buy a 2x2 or larger 5/8" light stand mountable board reflector? I want something that lasts a long time. It's getting too expensive to rent those.
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 16 July 2006 - 11:31 AM

Ever hear of "Google"?

http://www.bhphotovi..._42x42_-_Silver
http://www.bhphotovi...r...t&sku=33444
http://www.matthewsg...p...cat=45&pg=2

The really sturdy ones are on a wooden base but they are expensive.

You need a combo stand, something with a junior mount.
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#3 Brian Dzyak

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Posted 16 July 2006 - 12:28 PM

Does anybody know where to buy a 2x2 or larger 5/8" light stand mountable board reflector? I want something that lasts a long time. It's getting too expensive to rent those.



I just recently used a nice portable "system" made by Westcott. They are based in Toledo, Ohio but don't sell directly. Just do a Google search and you'll find a retailer. http://www.fjwestcot...ts/scrimjim.htm

You can build a 72" x 72" frame or a 96" x 96" frame and attach any number of diffusion or reflective fabrics to it. Be sure to purchase the clamps as well so you can mount the frame to a C-stand. Sandbags are a great idea too! (think wind)

I use the smaller version with either a full diffusion or something solid to take all the sun off the talent...then the larger frame will hold a 2 stop net that will help knock down the background a bit if necessary. If I can't get power for a Joker, I'll turn one of the frames into a bounce by attaching the reflective white/silver material.

So far the kits have proven to be fairly durable. It only takes a couple extra minutes to build and set up which is a huge plus when you don't have any or enough help. The downside is that they are a bit expensive for what they are, but in the long run, they are versatile enough that it seems worth it instead of carting around a taco cart's worth of every variety flag, diffusion, and reflector imaginable.

Or just buy a platypus clamp and some foam core! That does the trick too.

Edited by bjdzyak, 16 July 2006 - 12:32 PM.

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#4 T-Spect Le

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Posted 21 July 2006 - 12:32 AM

Got it. Very helpful suggestions from both of you. Thanks. Very interesting to know that Wescott make the background scrim to control the light contrast ratio. Prior to this I had to light the subject to match the background. The problem with this approach is that the talent is blinded by heavy front fill lights. They get very uncomfortable, particulary during the sizzling summer season.


I just recently used a nice portable "system" made by Westcott. They are based in Toledo, Ohio but don't sell directly. Just do a Google search and you'll find a retailer. http://www.fjwestcot...ts/scrimjim.htm

You can build a 72" x 72" frame or a 96" x 96" frame and attach any number of diffusion or reflective fabrics to it. Be sure to purchase the clamps as well so you can mount the frame to a C-stand. Sandbags are a great idea too! (think wind)

I use the smaller version with either a full diffusion or something solid to take all the sun off the talent...then the larger frame will hold a 2 stop net that will help knock down the background a bit if necessary. If I can't get power for a Joker, I'll turn one of the frames into a bounce by attaching the reflective white/silver material.

So far the kits have proven to be fairly durable. It only takes a couple extra minutes to build and set up which is a huge plus when you don't have any or enough help. The downside is that they are a bit expensive for what they are, but in the long run, they are versatile enough that it seems worth it instead of carting around a taco cart's worth of every variety flag, diffusion, and reflector imaginable.

Or just buy a platypus clamp and some foam core! That does the trick too.


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#5 Brian Dzyak

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Posted 21 July 2006 - 02:30 AM

Got it. Very helpful suggestions from both of you. Thanks. Very interesting to know that Wescott make the background scrim to control the light contrast ratio. Prior to this I had to light the subject to match the background. The problem with this approach is that the talent is blinded by heavy front fill lights. They get very uncomfortable, particulary during the sizzling summer season.


The background scrim is helpful, but it isn't a 100% cure unfortunately. The heaviest they make is a double. If I put my subject against a background in full sun and cut it with that, I still was in need of something like 2 more stops. The problem on my end is that all I can carry on my trips is an 800w HMI Joker which doesn't amount to much firepower to compete with the sun. Even if I topped out with a 1200w, it still would come up short.

Don't get me wrong, the background scrim is extremely helpful, but there is still a compromise going on when choosing an exposure unless you have the means to power up something in the neighborhood of a 2K. But if you can do that, then you probably aren't in need of a lightweight portable ScrimJim system either. :)
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Tai Audio

Glidecam

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