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#1 alexis stodghill

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Posted 18 July 2006 - 11:04 AM

Hello,

I currently have a grant from the United States Wildlife Division to film and photograph 28 different reptile species in Eastern America. I have no idea what the end film will be used for.

These are all endangered species, will require many weeks in the woods, (some species have only been seen miles and miles from what one could even consider a town)

I will definatley be camping. It is myself solo.

I will be filming such reptiles and animals such as Timber Rattlesnakes, the Massasaqua rattlesnake and other small critters.

Included in this is the Brown Recluse, a spider about the size of a dime, who can scurry at a clocked speed of almost 3 mph. That's pretty darn fast for a posionous spider.

I have looked at several cameras, film is obviously out, I don't have time to juggle perching on a rock, watching a rattlesnake 5 ft away and deal with film cannisters.

I am looking for a setup that can deal with long range shots (For instance, I know that some areas i will not be able to access, but may see my target within a hundred yards away or so)


As well as very detailed closeup shots (see spider above)


Weight IS a consideration, but this needs to be as professional as can be, or I'd just grab any cam at walmart and go to town.


What would you suggest if it was you?
What would you use and why?
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#2 Rik Andino

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Posted 18 July 2006 - 03:02 PM

Well film would be nice to use...but you're right it can be too cumbersome.
Try one of the new HDV cameras...
They're fairly lightweight...compared to more professional HD cameras
And the resolution can be really high good for when doing does Extreme CU.

I think the Canon H1 would be very good because of two reasons...
It's got a really good zoom lens especially on the long size
Which can be swapped if necessary (you can even use Canon still lens with an adapter...
Which is good if you're using a canon still camera)
And it's got pretty high resolution
Which is very useful if you need to blow up the picture to get a better CU.

Eitherways you should research several cameras...
And actually try them out to get a feel for what you want to do.


Good Luck
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#3 alexis stodghill

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Posted 18 July 2006 - 05:30 PM

Well film would be nice to use...but you're right it can be too cumbersome.
Try one of the new HDV cameras...
They're fairly lightweight...compared to more professional HD cameras
And the resolution can be really high good for when doing does Extreme CU.

I think the Canon H1 would be very good because of two reasons...
It's got a really good zoom lens especially on the long size
Which can be swapped if necessary (you can even use Canon still lens with an adapter...
Which is good if you're using a canon still camera)
And it's got pretty high resolution
Which is very useful if you need to blow up the picture to get a better CU.

Eitherways you should research several cameras...
And actually try them out to get a feel for what you want to do.
Good Luck




I was looking into one of these:

http://pro.jvc.com/p...el_id=MDL101539


With a Chrosziel Matte Box, I've got to narrow down my lenses now.

Anyone used this camera that has any good solid input?
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#4 Rik Andino

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Posted 20 July 2006 - 04:19 AM

I was looking into one of these:

http://pro.jvc.com/p...el_id=MDL101539
With a Chrosziel Matte Box, I've got to narrow down my lenses now.

Anyone used this camera that has any good solid input?


That's the JVC H100
I've worked on two shows that shot with these...
The footage on the monitor was pretty impressive.

From what I hear you can put on an adapter that allows you to use 2/3" lenses
That means you can get really good glass for these cameras...
Depending on how much you're willing to spend.

SInce you mentioned you might want to shoot from a distance
I suggest you search for a zoom lens that's a bit on the long side.


Good Luck
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Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Glidecam

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Aerial Filmworks

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