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Metering for the XLH1


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#1 Davon Slininger

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Posted 19 July 2006 - 03:20 AM

I'm going to be shooting a short this weekend using the XLH1 with a mini35 adapter and am trying to figure out how to meter for this thing.

Starway2001 has mentioned in this forum that they rated the XLH1 asa at 320. I can't seem to find an accurate measure of the stop loss from the mini35 on an XLH1 though.

So how do I go about figuring out how to meter my scenes. I'll have the monitor of course but I would like to keep in the good habit of figuring out my ratios and setting apertures based on metering calculations.

I feel like the answer is blatantly obvious but i'm just not getting it, please excuse the "noob" question.

thanks all for any replies.
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#2 Robert Sanders

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Posted 19 July 2006 - 03:31 PM

I'm going to be shooting a short this weekend using the XLH1 with a mini35 adapter and am trying to figure out how to meter for this thing.

Starway2001 has mentioned in this forum that they rated the XLH1 asa at 320. I can't seem to find an accurate measure of the stop loss from the mini35 on an XLH1 though.

So how do I go about figuring out how to meter my scenes. I'll have the monitor of course but I would like to keep in the good habit of figuring out my ratios and setting apertures based on metering calculations.

I feel like the answer is blatantly obvious but i'm just not getting it, please excuse the "noob" question.

thanks all for any replies.


I've heard that you lose about 1.5 stops with the Mini35 adapter.
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#3 Alex Haspel

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Posted 19 July 2006 - 03:58 PM

I've heard that you lose about 1.5 stops with the Mini35 adapter.


and i read that the xlh1 is to be rated at around 200asa.

but i'm not sure how trustworthy that information is.
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#4 EricUlbrich

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Posted 29 July 2006 - 04:54 AM

There really is no reason to meter when shooting for HD. The only time you really have to pull out your meter is for a LUX or Footcandle reading. Other than that, what you see is what you get, light to you video tap and your eye.
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#5 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 29 July 2006 - 11:07 AM

There really is no reason to meter when shooting for HD. The only time you really have to pull out your meter is for a LUX or Footcandle reading. Other than that, what you see is what you get, light to you video tap and your eye.


Or pre-lighting sets. Or balancing lights, like having someone walk through several spots and wanting them to each be exactly the same f-stop. Or scouting locations.

Otherwise, I don't use a meter much on an HD shoot.
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#6 olan

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Posted 29 July 2006 - 11:45 AM

Hi,
We?ve just shot a video clip on canon H1/P+S adapter/cook S4. You can have a look here http://www.cinematog...showtopic=15727
The camera shutter was at 1/50 for 120 ASA and lenses were always open at f2.
If you have any questions? just ask.
Good luck for your shoot.

Olan
www.theblacksheep.be
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#7 Christopher Wedding

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Posted 14 October 2006 - 11:14 PM

We just did a test with XLH1 and got the same 200ASA result using an 18% Grey Card and a Spot/Incident Meter.

We also hooked it up to a waveform via the firewire output to FCP and got really interesting results when adjusting the different settings. Looks like to get the whites white and the black black and a smooth dynamic range we used Cine 1 gamma, High Knee, and a master pedestal of -9. Also, we felt that the Cine 1 color matrix looked best with the colors on the chart. However, the color matrix settings seem to be related strictly to the color gain function. Therefore, we were able to achieve the same coloring on the normal color matrix setting by simply making the color gain a -3 setting. We matched the Cine 2 Color Matrix in the Normal Color Matrix by taking the Color Gain to -5.

BTW, we did make sure our signal via firewire was accurate by comparing against the 100% Zebras as well as the initial color bars. As for the colors, that's a little more relative.

Anyhow, thanks for reading.

Best,
Chris
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Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

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