Jump to content


Photo

Shooting into practicles


  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 Ian Takahashi SOC

Ian Takahashi SOC
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 14 posts
  • Camera Operator
  • Los Angeles

Posted 19 July 2006 - 03:00 PM

I was wondering if anyone had any advice for me...I am shooting a music video in which they want banks and banks of practicles in the background (they are supposed to look like maxi-brutes, like that linkin park video, where you are looking at their backs and into 100's of lights) but I am having problems getting rid of the flares, some are fine but I am getting a small flare from every globe.

Is there a certain globe/lamp-lense/lamp or camera lenses/filters that I can use to minimize the flares from these lights? I am using Cooke S4's right now, they usually don't flare as easily, any other ideas? I would like to do this while shooting, should we just add it in post?

Would using diffusion or frosted globes help?

thanks

Ian
  • 0

#2 Max Jacoby

Max Jacoby
  • Sustaining Members
  • 2955 posts
  • Other

Posted 19 July 2006 - 05:19 PM

The simplest solution would be to shoot with Zeiss Master Primes. Getting a flare with those is a major event and will create quite a stirr with both Arri and Zeiss I can tell you from personal experience.
  • 0

#3 Chris Keth

Chris Keth
  • Sustaining Members
  • 4427 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • Los Angeles

Posted 19 July 2006 - 07:09 PM

The simplest solution would be to shoot with Zeiss Master Primes. Getting a flare with those is a major event and will create quite a stirr with both Arri and Zeiss I can tell you from personal experience.



Frosted globes might help a little, but this is probably the best answer. In addition, read the American Cinematographer with "Chicago in it to see how they solved the problem.
  • 0

#4 Tomas Koolhaas

Tomas Koolhaas
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 334 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • los angeles

Posted 19 July 2006 - 08:09 PM

The simplest solution would be to shoot with Zeiss Master Primes. Getting a flare with those is a major event and will create quite a stirr with both Arri and Zeiss I can tell you from personal experience.


Hi,
I agree with this, I seem to remember even super speeds flare less than S4's, Most Zeiss lenses flare less than most Cookes, from what I have experienced.
Cheers.
  • 0

#5 Ratheesh Ravindran

Ratheesh Ravindran
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 23 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Kolkata,India

Posted 28 July 2006 - 10:24 AM

I was wondering if anyone had any advice for me...I am shooting a music video in which they want banks and banks of practicles in the background (they are supposed to look like maxi-brutes, like that linkin park video, where you are looking at their backs and into 100's of lights) but I am having problems getting rid of the flares, some are fine but I am getting a small flare from every globe.

Is there a certain globe/lamp-lense/lamp or camera lenses/filters that I can use to minimize the flares from these lights? I am using Cooke S4's right now, they usually don't flare as easily, any other ideas? I would like to do this while shooting, should we just add it in post?

Would using diffusion or frosted globes help?

thanks

Ian


Hi,
There's another simple trick.Just rub some bathing soap to get a mild coating of it on all the practicals.Yes you need to spend some time in doing this,but still try this out.Believe me ,this really works out to cut that extra flare ...! All the best...!
Ratheesh Ravindran.
  • 0

#6 Chris Keth

Chris Keth
  • Sustaining Members
  • 4427 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • Los Angeles

Posted 28 July 2006 - 07:11 PM

Hi,
There's another simple trick.Just rub some bathing soap to get a mild coating of it on all the practicals.Yes you need to spend some time in doing this,but still try this out.Believe me ,this really works out to cut that extra flare ...! All the best...!
Ratheesh Ravindran.



Um, soap=fat...won't that just melt and then smoke and smell terrible? :huh:

Edited by Christopher D. Keth, 28 July 2006 - 07:11 PM.

  • 0

#7 Tony Brown

Tony Brown
  • Sustaining Members
  • 689 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • London

Posted 09 August 2006 - 02:04 PM

Golden rule. Never use an in shot light as your light source. Put all the lights in shot through a dimmer to bring them to a level where they dont flare.

Use seperate lighting for your subjects.

For me this has always been a golden rule and I've yet to find an exception
  • 0

#8 David Mullen ASC

David Mullen ASC
  • Sustaining Members
  • 19759 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 09 August 2006 - 06:33 PM

Golden rule. Never use an in shot light as your light source. Put all the lights in shot through a dimmer to bring them to a level where they dont flare.

Use seperate lighting for your subjects.

For me this has always been a golden rule and I've yet to find an exception


I've lit people with in-shot practicals, like a gooseneck/flexarm desklamp for example -- you can keep most of the bulb hidden by the lamp housing so you don't get much flare and light the actor at his desk with the real light. I did that in "Akeelah and the Bee" because I had to dolly 180 degrees around the desk as Akeelah worked at her computer. I've always been inspired by that shot in "E.T." where Eliot is lit by the desk lamp and E.T.'s hand comes into frame over his shoulder (a homage to "War of the Worlds".)

Also if someone is close enough to a table lamp, you can use it to light the person and not get flare.

And many times I've lit a bar scene with a bare flo in the shot, on the counter, lighting the person.

I like bright practicals in frame that actually look like they are putting out enough light for the room & subject whenever possible.
  • 0


Aerial Filmworks

Visual Products

Willys Widgets

Wooden Camera

rebotnix Technologies

Rig Wheels Passport

Tai Audio

The Slider

Technodolly

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Glidecam

FJS International, LLC

Metropolis Post

Ritter Battery

CineLab

CineTape

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Opal

Abel Cine

Paralinx LLC

Ritter Battery

Visual Products

rebotnix Technologies

Opal

Technodolly

Metropolis Post

Rig Wheels Passport

Willys Widgets

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

CineLab

CineTape

Tai Audio

Paralinx LLC

FJS International, LLC

Aerial Filmworks

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Glidecam

The Slider

Wooden Camera

Abel Cine