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testing for eastman double-x negative 5222


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#1 Vincenzo Condorelli AIC

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Posted 20 July 2006 - 08:34 AM

hello everybody,
i'm an italian student of cinematography and next term i'll have to light a 35 mm short to be shot on kodak eastman double-x negative 5222.
i enjoy a lot reading this forum, very very useful, and i was wondering if any of you has experience with this stock and would be willing to share any suggestions or ideas.
in particular, i'd like to to ask you what is the better way to make some tests, given the fact that i'll have only 100 ft developed by the lab for testing.

i definitely need more. would still pictures be of an use? does kodak still produce this stock for still cameras?

any other way?

thanks a lot to whom will be keen to help...
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#2 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 20 July 2006 - 03:41 PM

hello everybody,
i'm an italian student of cinematography and next term i'll have to light a 35 mm short to be shot on kodak eastman double-x negative 5222.
i enjoy a lot reading this forum, very very useful, and i was wondering if any of you has experience with this stock and would be willing to share any suggestions or ideas.
in particular, i'd like to to ask you what is the better way to make some tests, given the fact that i'll have only 100 ft developed by the lab for testing.

i definitely need more. would still pictures be of an use? does kodak still produce this stock for still cameras?

any other way?

thanks a lot to whom will be keen to help...


Here is the technical data:

http://www.kodak.com...s....10.4&lc=en

5222 shares some B&W technology with Kodak B&W still films, but it is not the same.
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#3 Vincenzo Condorelli AIC

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Posted 22 July 2006 - 05:37 AM

Here is the technical data:

http://www.kodak.com...s....10.4&lc=en

5222 shares some B&W technology with Kodak B&W still films, but it is not the same.


thanks john...indeed i've got in contact with kodak u.k. and they are going to send me the equivalent still films (they use it for testing as well), then i'll get it processed at the same lab where they develop and print the film stock.
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#4 Kim Sargenius

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Posted 19 September 2006 - 03:48 AM

Hi Condor (?)


I don't know how things work around where you are but my local lab will develop motion picture stock from stills cassettes. 36 exposures is about 3' or 4' so it can be a very cost effective way of doing tests.

I've shot a little bit of 5222 and I've always found it a little flat for my taste - developed normally you'll get a lot of tones of grey and it will show quite a bit of grain if you have a lot of flat mid tones.

Would your tests include different gammas?



Hope this helps,


Kim Sargenius
cinematographer
sydney
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#5 Matt Sandstrom

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Posted 19 September 2006 - 07:16 AM

I've shot a little bit of 5222 and I've always found it a little flat for my taste - developed normally you'll get a lot of tones of grey

i know what you mean, but i don't quite agree. the contrast is low, sure, but so is the latitude. this emulsion seems to capture a pretty narrow range, which would normally result in a contrasty picture, but presents it in a very "grey gamma". this is very easy to fix by printing to a more contrasty stock or just boosting the contrast in telecine. i have a feeling that processing it differently would just reduce the latitude and increase the grain even more and still just give you a low con negative. but while i've shot plenty of this stock i've never experimented with pushing...

/matt
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#6 Sam Wells

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Posted 19 September 2006 - 12:00 PM

Hi, if the lab's "normal" process is 0.65 gamma then try 7.0

The best results I got from this stock were printing on Agfa 5.61; unfortunately not possible now.
(This print stock had wonderful silvery midtones, at some sacrifice of deepest Dmax but one could push the print stock a little also ---)

The Gordon Willis / Woody Allen films were done this way, but I don't know what Willis did re processing, however DuArt's 0.65 looked to me like Alpha Cine's 7.0 just to confuse us B)

But that was a long while ago.

Yes more development = more grain, I think this stock works better in 35mm (but I know DP's who love the grain in 16mm too).

I suspect you would not loose much latitude @ 0.70 but test...

-Sam
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