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smallformat 3/2006 is coming


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#1 filmfreund

filmfreund
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Posted 20 July 2006 - 02:59 PM

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Here are the topics of our new issue and - like Tim was asking for - after that you will find one article for free. This is a special service for users of www.cinematography.com:


clapper HARDLY DEAD, YET ALREADY REVIVED Jürgen Lossau about Single-8

viewer news from WITTNER CINETEC, KODAK, RETRO 8 and SINGLE8FILM.COM

zoom SUPER-8 PLAYGROUND Jürgen Lossau shows special toys ? made in Switzerland

the old babies CURIOUS CAMERAS Readers of our magazine made photos of their strange cameras

super-8 FRANKA DIGS UP NIGHTSHADE Claus Krönke about a professional made Super 8 movie

interview ?I HAVE NEVER USED SUPER 8 BEFORE? Jürgen Lossau asked Frank Griebe about his pictures of the Nightshade movie

test VIDEO ON FILM! Jürgen Lossau about a revolutionary idea from Canada

test A NEW 16 MM OPTION says Ronald Vedrilla about the Ektachrome 100 D

16mm A SUBERB SUPER 16 CANERA Gerhard Fromm about the new Arri 416

16mm A TOUGH BONE from Sweden was examined by Claus Krönke: The Ikonoskop a-cam

screening OUT OF THE BOX Keith Wilton & John Clancy about the history of the package movie

movie school SUPER-8 IS SUPER! Dr. Carl-Hellmut Hoefer?s basic training for beginners. This time he devotes himself to the projector

movie school SEEN LOTS BUT UNDERSTOOD LITTLE? asks Arnold H. Müller

super-8 THE STRAIGHT 8 MINI of Paul Beard

super-8 LONG-DISTANCE SUPER 8 A look at the Beaulieu SD8/60 film drive by Dr. Carl-Hellmut Hoefer

super-8 DOG YEARS Giles Perkins about a very special super 8 movie

power pack DIY SCANNING Frank Kempelmann with his clever approach to frame-by-frame film transfer

labs E6 IN A HOME LAB Beatrice Jäggi develops color films herself


E6 in a home lab
Develop color and B&W Super 8 film yourself

Text: Beatrice Jäggi

The UPB-1A-Lomo is a lightproof film processing tank originally designed for processing Super 8 and 16 mm films (15 m). The black Bakelite container was manufactured in the former USSR until around 1985. With a little bit of skill and training, this film developing tank is easy to manipulate and has the great advantage that film can be wound upon the film reel without additional equipment. One can process both B&W and color film really well using this equipment.

The reel is designed to process the following formats:

* 1 reel of Super 8 or
* 1 reel of 16 mm film or
* 2 reels of Super 8 film or
* 1 reel of Super 8 along with 1 reel of 16 mm film

Loading film onto the spiral reels

The biggest challenge when using this developing tank is winding the film onto the spiral reels. The best way to learn is to have several ?dry runs? before touching exposed film. It is important to be perfectly familiar with each step, since this task must be mastered later on in absolute darkness. It is somewhat tricky, but by exercising a little care, the Lomo tank can be loaded within a few minutes.

Loading the tank with one reel of Super 8 film: In this configuration, the individual components must be screwed together as follows: First comes the bottom spiral wheel (with centered thread), followed by the top flange with the spokes, while the threaded part must be on top. Next comes the small diameter black spacing ring down in the center of the top flange. Both elements must now be screwed together; first the bottom and then the top shank.

When finished, the film can be threaded onto the spiral reel in various different ways, the simplest of which is described here: First remove the Super 8 film from its magazine and wind it onto a common film reel (in absolute darkness). Ensure the film winds from the center of the reel to the outside. The simplest threading of the film can be done while the top flange is still not firmly tightened. This makes it possible to insert the film into the notches in the center.

Now tilt the film flat away from the center of the reel to the left and turn the reel a half turn clockwise. Now you can firmly tighten the top flange and other components. The reel is always loaded clockwise with its light sensitive emulsion on the outside. Now turn the spiral reel slowly clockwise with your right hand, letting the film slip gently between the index finger and thumb of your left hand at a 45° angle (it?s best to use a cotton glove during this process). After reaching the end of the film, it should be fastened onto the reel with a piece of adhesive tape.

Alternate reel configurations

It is possible to process several films at once in the tank.

2 reels of Super 8 film: Screw a transparent spacer ring to the floor of the bottom spiral reel (with centered thread). Then position the middle spiral reel with the threads visible upward, followed by the spoked flange with the threaded part on top. These three components must then be screwed together using the bottom and top shanks.

1 reel of 16 mm or Double 8 film: First comes the bottom spiral wheel (with centered thread), followed by the spoked top flange, while the threaded part must be facing downwards. Next comes the small diameter black spacing ring down in the center of the top flange. Both elements must now be screwed together; first the bottom and then the top shank.

1 reel of 16 mm and 1 reel of Super 8 film: Screw a transparent spacer ring onto the floor of the bottom spiral reel (with centered thread). Then position the middle spiral reel with the threads showing upward, followed by the spoked flange with the threaded part down. These three components must then be screwed together using the bottom and top shanks.


Developing film in the Lomo tank

When the Lomo tank is loaded with film, the remaining steps can be performed in the light. The tank is designed so that solutions are poured through the filler pipe on top and drained through the floor hose. Filling and draining the solutions always takes a few seconds, limiting control over the film development process. One can achieve much better control, however, by not pouring the solutions over the film but rather submerging the film in the solution. As soon as you gained some film processing skill, the following procedure is recommended.

1. Have all solutions at the correct temperature and have a photo lab clock ready.

2. Open the tank in absolute darkness and place the film reels carefully to one side.

3. Now fill the tank with the first solution, the rinse (see Developing the film for the sequence of solutions). Submerge the reel set carefully into the water while turning the reel slowly clockwise. It is recommended that you carefully tap the film reels against the bottom several times at the beginning to avoid air bubbles. Rinsing takes roughly one minute.

Now take the set of reels out of the water and put it aside to drain the water from the tank. Remember to perform all these steps in absolute darkness. For orientation, replace the film reels back in the tank and turn on the light as soon as the lightproof lid is in position and locked.

4. Now comes the first developer. Open the tank in absolute darkness again and put the film reels to one side. Fill the tank carefully with the solution. It is advisable to always submerge the set of film reels into the solution roughly 10 seconds prior to the real processing time and knock them carefully several times against the floor of the tank (air bubbles). Turn the set of film reels slowly clockwise in the solution. Now you can close the lightproof tank lid again and turn on the light.

5. Turn the reels slowly clockwise for five seconds out of every 30 seconds during the development procedure. It is important that the film reels are not permanently or roughly moved, since this could result in uneven film development.

6. As the end of the developing bath nears, take sufficient time to drain the solution from the tank. This can be done through the hose in the floor of the tank, which takes a few seconds, or more swiftly by turning off the light, taking the film reel set out of the solution, putting it in a rinsing tank and then emptying the tank containing the solution. Bear in mind that the set of film reels loaded with film must not be exposed to light until re-exposure. Before turning the light on, make sure the reel is back in the lightproof tank.

7. It is important to keep exactly to your time schedule for the first processing bath, because that is how the f-stop number is controlled. The second development bath may also be done in the light.

Drying the film

After the final rinse it is a good practice to submerge the film into distilled water for approximately one minute. The best way to dry the film is a philosophy all of its own. Generally speaking, it is possible to dry the film on the set of film reels. However, this requires several hours and it is important to shake as much moisture as possible from the film reel assembly. It is also possible to use a supplementary fast film dryer (mostly alcohol based).

Removing the film from the spiral reels is performed much like threading, by pulling slowly and carefully at a 45° - 90° angle from the reel. It should be wound immediately onto a Super 8 take-up reel. It is also important to position the film correctly on the reel. In the end, the start of the film must be on the reel as follows: The matte (emulsion) side of the film should be on the outside, with images upside down. When threading film into the projector, the perforation is on the left side as viewed from the front.


Using the E6 procedure to process color film

The Tetenal ?Colortec E-6? developing kit is based on the E-6 developing procedure used to process color slides. With the help of this developing procedure it is not difficult to process a color Super 8 film such as the new Ektachrome 64 T in a Lomo spiral tank. The chemical kit is also capable of processing old Agfa Moviechrome or Fujichrome film. These films have a black protective coating on the reverse side, which prevents light from the cartridge pressure plate leaking through the film. This coating should be removed first from the film in a time-consuming procedure before processing. As with Super 8 B&W film, all steps until the film is threaded in the tank must be performed in absolute darkness (see instructions for developing B&W film). It is not possible to process Kodachrome 40 film using an E-6 developing kit. This requires a special procedure developed by Kodak.

The ?Colortec E-6? developing kit is applied using three processes and one stabilizing solution:
- first processing
- color processing
- bleach fix
- stabilizer

The reversal takes place during the color processing, bleaching and fixing in a combined bleach fix bath. Processing times can be found in the instructions. They also tell you how to mix the solutions.

What do you need to process film? Processing is best performed in a photo lab (dark room).
In addition, the following is required:

* warm tap water
* color processing thermometer
* electric heating plate

One ?Colortec E-6? developing kit makes a half-liter of solution. Processing one Super 8 film in the Lomo tank requires two liters of developing kit. To process two Super 8 films, three liters of developing kit are needed. Both of the initial process baths (first and color processing) require a temperature of 38°C. It is necessary to warm up the solutions to the correct temperature first. This can be done on a common electric range (for this purpose, a gas range is not suitable!).

Tips and Tricks

A little exercise is necessary to warm the solutions up to precise temperatures. The solutions are best warmed in an old pan. The range should be set to medium temperature. While constantly checking the temperature of the solution using a thermometer, the solution should be continuously stirred with the other hand using an old spoon. This ensures that the temperature of the solution rises constantly and slowly. Half a degree before reaching the processing temperature, the pan should be taken off the range. The temperature will rise a bit more and stop slightly higher than the processing temperature (the tolerance is ± 0.3 degrees).

Take into consideration that the solution?s temperature will fall in the tank by one or two degrees during processing. This can be avoided by placing the tank in a sink full of warm water at the correct processing temperature for the respective solutions (the level in the sink must not be too high, to prevent water ingress into the tank).

As with all film processing methods, these solutions must be stirred continuously. Excessive rotation of the spindle will very quickly generate turbulence around the film reels. This results in visible unevenness, especially in the dark parts of the film. The reels should be slightly lifted and lowered spindle first and then carefully turned 360 degrees. The tank should then be carefully rocked (north/south and then east/west). Repeat this process every 30 seconds for a duration of five seconds, or every 60 seconds for a 10 second period.

Pouring the solution over the film is not recommended. Instead, submerge the reel set in the solution-filled tank. As with most things, practice makes perfect. Try the whole procedure on less important shots before tackling important films.




Tank specifications

The tank consists of:

* tank chamber with hose connection on the bottom
* lightproof lid
* lower film spiral with centered thread
* middle film spiral without centered thread
* upper spoked flange
* 2 transparent spacer rings with thread
* 1 black spacer ring
* lower mounting shank
* upper mounting shank with filler pipe for filling solutions

Tank diameter: 23 cm
Reel diameter: 21.5 cm; it is possible to thread a 15 m film
Capacity: the tank has the capacity to hold nearly 1.8 liters of solution and requires:

1 liter for 1 reel of Super 8 or 16 mm film
1.4 liters for 2 reels of Super 8 film
1.6 liters for 1 reel of Super 8 and 1 reel of 16 mm film



Tetenal COLORTEC E-6 3-Bath Kit
3-bath technology. For inversion and rotary processing. Simplified processing and high processing reliability through a reduced number of baths. Classic development of all reversal films. Yield: 1 liter: for 12 slide films. 5 liters: for 60 slide films.

Part No.: 102031
EAN No.: 4000577020315
1 liter packaging

Part No.: 102034
EAN No.: 4000577020346
5 liter packaging

www.tetenal.de (German or English)
www.tetenal.co.uk



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#2 filmfreund

filmfreund
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Posted 05 August 2006 - 01:55 PM

smallformat 3/2006 was shieppd on Friday.
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