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Lip Sync in 16mm


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#1 Matthew Buick

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Posted 22 July 2006 - 04:30 PM

I am thinking about shooting my movies in 16mm, most probably with an ARRI 16S, ST or S/B.
I know these are noisy cams, is Lip Sync in post-production a viable poption?
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#2 Tim Carroll

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Posted 22 July 2006 - 04:45 PM

I am thinking about shooting my movies in 16mm, most probably with an ARRI 16S, ST or S/B.
I know these are noisy cams, is Lip Sync in post-production a viable poption?


This has been covered quite extensively. Do a forum search. Here are a few links to get you started:

How to Dub Non-Sync Cameras

and:

Faux Sync Sound 16mm

-Tim
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#3 Chris Keth

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Posted 23 July 2006 - 03:38 AM

Two questions apply:

How much time and money do you have budgeted for post?

How masochistic are you?
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#4 Matt Pacini

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Posted 24 July 2006 - 06:43 PM

I keep giving advice NOT to do this, and so far, I think exactly zero people have believed me.

I've done it.
It's a freakin' nightmare.
It's NOT cheaper or easier to shoot this way!!!
Get a quiet camera. It's easier to shoot, post production is about 1/1000 the hassle, and results are MUCH better.
If you don't follow my advice, the amount of money and time you spend trying to fix the problem, is FAR in excess of the cost of getting a quiet camera.
It's not even close.

MP
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#5 Scot McPhie

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Posted 24 July 2006 - 09:07 PM

I keep giving advice NOT to do this, and so far, I think exactly zero people have believed me.

I've done it.
It's a freakin' nightmare.
It's NOT cheaper or easier to shoot this way!!!
Get a quiet camera. It's easier to shoot, post production is about 1/1000 the hassle, and results are MUCH better.
If you don't follow my advice, the amount of money and time you spend trying to fix the problem, is FAR in excess of the cost of getting a quiet camera.
It's not even close.

MP


Matt's dead right - I've never done a whole film this way but parts of it - and it is extremely hard and time consuming - it's quite possible though - but you'd probably find it's more time and cost effective to save for longer and buy a better camera and then go and shoot the film.

Scot
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#6 Leo Anthony Vale

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Posted 25 July 2006 - 01:34 PM

I am thinking about shooting my movies in 16mm, most probably with an ARRI 16S, ST or S/B.
I know these are noisy cams, is Lip Sync in post-production a viable poption?


It works best if you do the post dubbing in Italian or Russian or Cantonese.
Mandarin ought to be okay.

Non of those industries had lip-sync fetishes.

---LV
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#7 Matthew Buick

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Posted 25 July 2006 - 04:21 PM

These are just movies with my friends, I can already lip sync, I just need to teach them to.

Edited by Matthew Buick, 25 July 2006 - 04:21 PM.

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#8 Andy_Alderslade

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Posted 25 July 2006 - 05:37 PM

I keep giving advice NOT to do this, and so far, I think exactly zero people have believed me.

I've done it.
It's a freakin' nightmare.
It's NOT cheaper or easier to shoot this way!!!
Get a quiet camera. It's easier to shoot, post production is about 1/1000 the hassle, and results are MUCH better.
If you don't follow my advice, the amount of money and time you spend trying to fix the problem, is FAR in excess of the cost of getting a quiet camera.
It's not even close.


I've done it too, and for shorts its justifiable if it allows the production to commence on a shoe string, and that shooting on a shoe string is the only way the production can exist.

You have to work with and accept the limitations of the method though.

For commercial projects and features its simply silly.
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#9 David Sweetman

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Posted 25 July 2006 - 06:31 PM

an Arri 16bl won't run you much more than an Arri S, that's what I would reccomend; way less camera noise. Plus I've found that some actors percieve it as more professional, especially the ones who are new to film or who have limited technical knowledge. kinda looks more like what you'd think of as the typical "hollywood" camera.
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