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The Maine Workshops


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#1 Paul Wizikowski

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Posted 25 July 2006 - 06:52 PM

I have spent the last five years on various sets, working as a PA then Video Assist and now Camera Op./ AC/ DP depending on the scope of the project and what company is calling. That said I've learned a ton. I feel I have a handle on the video world and am really wanting to add film to my repertoire. So I have decided rather than keep on the pace of learning that Tulsa work has to offer I need to take a leap and attend a film class or two. I read a lot, but there is something to getting your hands on the gear and hearing from people that know that gear. My question is this...

Has anyone attended/taught at the Maine Workshops that could validate my desire to spend the money and time to attend their class "Feature Film Lighting". If not, thoughts on similiar programs that offer short bursts of classes like Maine does.

Thanks for any insight.
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#2 Chris Keth

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Posted 26 July 2006 - 01:07 AM

I have spent the last five years on various sets, working as a PA then Video Assist and now Camera Op./ AC/ DP depending on the scope of the project and what company is calling. That said I've learned a ton. I feel I have a handle on the video world and am really wanting to add film to my repertoire. So I have decided rather than keep on the pace of learning that Tulsa work has to offer I need to take a leap and attend a film class or two. I read a lot, but there is something to getting your hands on the gear and hearing from people that know that gear. My question is this...

Has anyone attended/taught at the Maine Workshops that could validate my desire to spend the money and time to attend their class "Feature Film Lighting". If not, thoughts on similiar programs that offer short bursts of classes like Maine does.

Thanks for any insight.



I can't comment specifically on the lighting workshop but I recently took the AC workshop and couldn't be happier. It was 12 hour days all week. Ours were usually a couple hours of lecture in the morning, hands-on stuff all afternoon, and another short lecture in the evening. A lighting class would likely be less lecture and more demos and hands-on stuff. For the AC workshop, both Arri and Panavision sent reps and cameras. Arri sent us a 435 extreme, a 235, and an SR3 advanced. Panavision sent a Panaflex Millenium, a Platinum, and a Panavised F900. There was also a Varicam, but I don't know who supplied it. Obviously, the workshops are well supplied and sponsered. I seem to remember hearing that Arri lighting sponsered the lighting workshops, as well.

I honestly can't recommend the place enough. Maybe talk to Doug Hart, he taught the AC workshop and he recently registered here.
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#3 Lance Boyle

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Posted 31 July 2006 - 04:24 PM

The Maine Film & Video Workshops has just cancelled it's academic program for the next year due to low enrollment.

My guess is it's because of their high prices, lack of accreditation, lack of financial aid available, and lack of a degree-awarding program.
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#4 Paul Wizikowski

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Posted 01 August 2006 - 12:00 PM

Interesting. Good to know.
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#5 Chris Keth

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Posted 01 August 2006 - 11:18 PM

Interesting. Good to know.



Remember that's only the sequenced program. They'll still offer single classes.
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#6 Francesco Bonomo

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Posted 02 August 2006 - 01:12 PM

The Maine Film & Video Workshops has just cancelled it's academic program for the next year due to low enrollment.


source?
A lot of the people I've attended 5 workshops with earlier this summer are still there, and one of them has just enrolled in the full academic program.

My guess is it's because of their high prices


I found it expensive, though not as expensive as many other schools and worth every single cent.

lack of accreditation[...] and lack of a degree-awarding program.


they're working on it, and the workshops already have a very strong reputation, so they really don't need "official" accreditation.

lack of financial aid available


check their website, you'll find out financial aid is available

I'll go back next year, cannot reccomend it enough...it was an amazing experience, changed my life.
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#7 Lance Boyle

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Posted 03 August 2006 - 09:00 AM

My source was someone from admissions who called me to tell me the news. I was supposed to have an interview but cancelled it when she said the next season of classes was cancelled.

Yes, they're still doing the short courses, but no academic classes.

She told me there were a some people in the pipeline for the fall that are now being turned away.

As far as the accreditation, they've been "working on it" for the better part of 10 years now. I don't see it being resolved anytime soon. I remember this was the problem when I finished High School back in 97. I wanted to apply for the Workshops, but couldn't afford it.

And they have very little financial aid. While I hear wonderful things about it, and I'm sure the price, while high, is worth it, I am not impressed with their business practices.
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#8 Francesco Bonomo

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Posted 03 August 2006 - 01:07 PM

My source was someone from admissions who called me to tell me the news. I was supposed to have an interview but cancelled it when she said the next season of classes was cancelled.


didn't know that, I guess some people I know will be quite disappointed

As far as the accreditation, they've been "working on it" for the better part of 10 years now. I don't see it being resolved anytime soon. I remember this was the problem when I finished High School back in 97. I wanted to apply for the Workshops, but couldn't afford it.


Well, I was just saying that, given the quality of the single workshops, the way you can design your own program and the very nature of this industry, why would you need a 3-year long academic program?

I guess it's my opinion is somehow biased, since I didn't get the chance to enroll in a film school (there's nothing like that in Italy), but I found the workshops such an amazing experience that I wouldn't consider an academic program at all.
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#9 Lance Boyle

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Posted 03 August 2006 - 05:42 PM

didn't know that, I guess some people I know will be quite disappointed
Well, I was just saying that, given the quality of the single workshops, the way you can design your own program and the very nature of this industry, why would you need a 3-year long academic program?

I guess it's my opinion is somehow biased, since I didn't get the chance to enroll in a film school (there's nothing like that in Italy), but I found the workshops such an amazing experience that I wouldn't consider an academic program at all.


I was interviewing about the one-year program, myself.
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#10 Paul Wizikowski

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Posted 08 August 2006 - 10:57 AM

Well, its all set. I'm headed there in October for the "Feature Film Lighting" workshop. I'll post here afterwards about the experience.
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#11 Paul Wizikowski

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Posted 28 August 2006 - 03:54 PM

FYI about whats going on at the Workshops...the owner is selling it. Recieved an email about it a week ago, here is an excerpt:

After 33 years, The Workshops? founder, director and owner, David Lyman, has announced that he is simplifying his life and is selling The Workshops and Rockport College, the campus and specific pieces of property in Rockport, Maine. David hopes to remain active at The Workshops in an advisory role, but wants more time for his own creative ventures: photography and writing, consulting and lecturing, producing a television series and raising his new family. David, who is 66, is justly proud of the two institutions he has built and all the people they have inspired, but at this stage of his life he thinks a sale of the schools will best ensure their continued growth and prosperity, as well as his own.

This transition is currently underway. David is considering a number of options, including selling the schools to a larger educational institution or a nonprofit organization, or to a benefactor who can acquire the schools, retire the bank debt and set the two schools on a new pathway to financial stability. His deadline for completing this transition is November 1.

Information on this sale and a summary of the elements of David?s holdings that are for sale are on The Workshops? web site, under the news section, lower left. Click on ?The Future.? Or, go directly to this link: http://www.theworksh...?NewsID=2215=23 <http://www.theworksh...15&SchoolID=23>

While this transition is in process, The College and The Workshops will remain much as they have been. The regular staff is on-board, as is David, as the schedule of 2007 workshops are made and announced later this coming fall.
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#12 Francesco Bonomo

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Posted 29 August 2006 - 02:41 PM

I receive the monthly newsletter and was shocked when I read the news at first, though I can understand why David is doing it. I feel very lucky to have been a student at the workshop while the founder was still there. I hope I can save enough money and go back next year, but I have to see how things could possibly change there. A smart new management would keep things as they are...
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#13 JoséRato

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Posted 05 September 2006 - 07:31 PM

I have spent the last five years on various sets, working as a PA then Video Assist and now Camera Op./ AC/ DP depending on the scope of the project and what company is calling. That said I've learned a ton. I feel I have a handle on the video world and am really wanting to add film to my repertoire. So I have decided rather than keep on the pace of learning that Tulsa work has to offer I need to take a leap and attend a film class or two. I read a lot, but there is something to getting your hands on the gear and hearing from people that know that gear. My question is this...

Has anyone attended/taught at the Maine Workshops that could validate my desire to spend the money and time to attend their class "Feature Film Lighting". If not, thoughts on similiar programs that offer short bursts of classes like Maine does.

Thanks for any insight.



I have done five Workshops in Maine,and my advice is check who is the teacher,and do a quick search on his curriculum.
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#14 Paul Wizikowski

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Posted 24 October 2006 - 09:51 AM

So, just got back from the Workshops. It was a very good experience although I had to change my expectations once there. In the end, the week was filled with great experiences, attempting different lighting setups, watching scenes from dozens of films, and discussing different approaches to lighting a scene. And I would say that now I have a better approach to lighting a scene but that there is no substitute for consistent and at-length time on set. The instructor was Michael Goi, ASC and he certainly knew his stuff.

My one complaint looking back is in the cost. As much as I tried to soak in stuff all week, I don't feel it revolutionized my abilities for the price it costs to attend.

This class was more theoretical than technical so there is less concrete info your going to take away from it, and I get that, but I felt I just wanted more... So "the more" is up to me getting myself on set and shooting more of my own stuff and just learning the way everyone has to.
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Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

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Visual Products

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Glidecam

rebotnix Technologies

Technodolly

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Tai Audio

Paralinx LLC

Metropolis Post

Wooden Camera

CineLab

Opal

Abel Cine

The Slider

Aerial Filmworks

Rig Wheels Passport

Ritter Battery