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Passing lights, house night interior


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#1 G McMahon

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Posted 26 July 2006 - 10:25 AM

Hello all,

Been searching through past forums, cannot seem to find anything giving any tips.

I am shooting a night interior and am trying to replicate the spilled lights from passing cars as the room lighting is motivated by the exterior lights. Janusz Kaminski ASC, had a similar scene in Munich.

Observing passing cars at home I notice the light fades up drifts and slowly attenuates. I was thinking a slightly diffused light on a pipe dolly on a dimmer. There are two windows along one side of the wall that the light will be coming from and I don?t want to slow things down by making it too complicated.

Has any one tried doing a similar effect/ shot?

Thanks,

Graeme
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 26 July 2006 - 10:40 AM

I've put two 1K's on a double-head mount on one stand and panned them through windows. You could put those on dimmers too, and you could swing them on a menace arm if you want a little tracking effect, otherwise you may have to dolly the lights.
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#3 Ofer Dori

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Posted 27 July 2006 - 06:22 AM

I've put two 1K's on a double-head mount on one stand and panned them through windows. You could put those on dimmers too, and you could swing them on a menace arm if you want a little tracking effect, otherwise you may have to dolly the lights.

hi , you can also pan the 1k to a miror reflector . it's give you two directions from one source.
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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 27 July 2006 - 11:23 AM

It all depends on if you want the light & shadows to actually move through the room (as if the car was driving by) or just sweep the windows, as if a car was turning a corner outside or coming in to park. If you need the light to actually creep across the surface of the room, it has to be physically moved outside of the windows. A good example of that is near the beginning of "Blood Simple" in a hotel room.
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#5 Matt Workman

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Posted 30 July 2006 - 06:54 PM

I'd be interested in seeing the results of these two techniques.

I remember in the scene from Munich where they are sitting in a car that the "car lights" looked a little fake. But still really pretty.

The 1ks sound like a good idea, Pars would be great for MS/CU shots.
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#6 G McMahon

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Posted 31 July 2006 - 01:46 AM

I remember in the scene from Munich where they are sitting in a car that the "car lights" looked a little fake. But still really pretty.


I was actually referring to a bedroom scene. Just in case you misinterpreted the scene I was referring to.

Graeme
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#7 David Sweetman

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Posted 31 July 2006 - 03:15 AM

I've developed a portable 1.2k 4-light fey (I think it's called a fey?) for just this type of application, it's got 4 300w bulbs in a solid wooden box with metal handles on the sides. It's very light, and can be easily carried and maneuvered by one person, but it's heavy enough to be moved smoothly. Takes zero set-up time because there's no track to lay. I'll be using it on a shoot I've got coming up in a few weeks to simulate passing streetlights in an automobile interior. It cost me about 45 bucks and my brother and I put it together in a day.
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#8 G McMahon

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Posted 31 July 2006 - 04:12 AM

I've developed a portable 1.2k 4-light fey (I think it's called a fey?) for just this type of application, it's got 4 300w bulbs in a solid wooden box with metal handles on the sides. It's very light, and can be easily carried and maneuvered by one person, but it's heavy enough to be moved smoothly. Takes zero set-up time because there's no track to lay. I'll be using it on a shoot I've got coming up in a few weeks to simulate passing streetlights in an automobile interior. It cost me about 45 bucks and my brother and I put it together in a day.



Do you have a photo? I'm lost as to how this system operates or is rigged.

Graeme
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#9 axela dardan

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Posted 16 March 2008 - 03:30 AM

I've developed a portable 1.2k 4-light fey (I think it's called a fey?) for just this type of application, it's got 4 300w bulbs in a solid wooden box with metal handles on the sides. It's very light, and can be easily carried and maneuvered by one person, but it's heavy enough to be moved smoothly. Takes zero set-up time because there's no track to lay. I'll be using it on a shoot I've got coming up in a few weeks to simulate passing streetlights in an automobile interior. It cost me about 45 bucks and my brother and I put it together in a day.



hello,
i am dealing with the same issue. i have a bw short coming up, on 35, set up in the school's studio, and i have to recreate the passing lights of the cars outside, through the "basement-windows" of the room. The studio is actually very tight, with not much room outside the walls to move around, so moving 1k, on a dolly track, would considerably demand a lot of time, which i cant afford....

so i considered this option, of a rigged-out light, but, could you be more specific on its shape and size... considering i have to move the lights to a very small distance from the windows, i think they should be quite distinct to leave rays on the wall, you could interpret as carlights


thanks,
diana
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